Viaggio studio?

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Ember
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Viaggio studio?

Post by Ember » Mon Jul 26, 2010 4:31 pm

In february I'll probably have my music diploma and as a gift from my whole family I'd like to ask for a month (I think august 2011) abroad (maybe Scotland or Ireland) to improve my English. I know it is not much and I won't learn a lot but... better than nothing! I also have to take my masters degree so I can't stay away for a longer period.

Do you know which is the better way to learn? Courses? Finding a job (for a month is a little difficult I think)? Staying in a family? What else?
*** homo sum: humani nihil a me alienum puto ***

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Peter
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Post by Peter » Mon Jul 26, 2010 5:55 pm

Hi Ella, although I cannot think of anything off the top of my head right now, I do think it is an excellent idea. Having to speak just English for most of the time will serve you well and I think you will pick up more than you will realise. You have the benefit of being quite comfortable with English anyway.

I am not sure there would be any courses at that time - it's during the school summer holidays. Staying with a family would be interesting, but there may be (and there may not!) problems organising that. As to jobs, well it depends what you will be happy doing for such a short period of time. It would be easy to suggest working in a restaurant or cafe, but would that be what you really have in mind.

If I can think of something I will contact you. :D

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Ember
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Post by Ember » Mon Jul 26, 2010 7:53 pm

Thank you Peter ;)

In Italy we have courses during the summer holidays made for students who want to learn Italian, so I thought maybe it will be the same there... the problem is that if I have a course I will probably meet foreign people like me, and for my experience, it's not like talking with a mother tongue. About the job, I'm not fussy, I can do anything but I don't have any experience in restaurants etc... so probably they'll have problems in employing me :)
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Chris Corbyn
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Post by Chris Corbyn » Tue Jul 27, 2010 7:06 pm

Brilliant idea! :)

In my experience, getting a job in a bar in the UK is not very difficult, even without any experience. I did this when I was a student and after the first job I worked in a couple of different bars, both easy to obtain work.

It seems like with bars, if you go in and ask if they have any positions available and they do have something, they'll basically just tell you to show up at a particular time and they'll decide after the first night if they're keeping you or not. This was my experience in Durham, where I went to university. I can't speak for all of the UK.

As for language schools, I'm almost certain there will be schools running right through the year. There are in Australia so I'd be amazed if there aren't in the UK. I do agree with you however. Being in a language school if you already have a good grip on English might not be the best way to spend your time. I have an Australian friend who I studied with in Australia, who has now come to Italy to spend 4 months in a language school. I personally don't think her Italian has improved that significantly because she's basically spent a lot of time covering topics she's already familiar with. She did have the benefit of being placed in a share-house with some Italian girls, but they ended up moving out and she's now living with American girls.

I think a bar job would be a perfect way to exercise your English. People love to chat to bar staff in the UK!

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coffeecup
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Post by coffeecup » Wed Jul 28, 2010 1:14 am

if I can give you any advice, it would be to stay with a local family!!

When we went to italy last year the only time we spoke italian all day was with our host families. We would go sight-seeing or go to their kids' schools and come home and talk about it with the families. I found this a great way to build my italian!

It can be a bit scary going outside of your comfort zone and forcing yourself to speak the language, but trust me it is well worth it.

Also, try to get in contact with the family before you go... you want to avoid personality clashes!

hope I've helped!

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mosta
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Post by mosta » Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:52 am

condividere la casa con altri ragazzi è sicuramente la situazione più divertente ma rischi anche di trovare pochissimi anglofoni.
Se decidi di stare in famiglia segui il consiglio di coffeecup ed informati bene sulla famiglia. Il primo mese che ho passato a Londra sono stato in una famiglia composta solo da un'anziana signora che vedevo raramente.
Last edited by mosta on Tue Nov 23, 2010 6:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
www.maiciat.com: il mio sito dove trovare amici per chattare ed imparare una lingua straniera!
mosta.webfactional.com: il mio blog

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Ember
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Post by Ember » Sun Nov 21, 2010 2:05 pm

Grazie per i consigli! Un ulteriore problema è che recentemente ho adottato un cane, e ho scoperto che è molto difficile farlo entrare in UK... per cui forse dovrò ripensare tutta la cosa :( vi farò sapere!!
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leenico
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Post by leenico » Mon Nov 22, 2010 5:21 am

Wow! A whole month abroad as a gift. I want to move in with your family. Do you think that they may want to adopt me? :D All kidding aside however, I think that your english is excellent. You probably talk the talk better than I do. I don't think though, that Scotland or Ireland are good choices to improve your english. Their use of idioms, and the difference in dialect might prove to be counterproductive to your learning experience. A better choice in my opinion would be England, or if your family is really generous a trip to the U.S. could be very beneficial. I think what Chris suggested would really be a great way to practice the language. If you were to take his suggestion to heart, I would propose seeking employment in an upscale bar. The clientele usually have a better command of the language. Although I'm not sure how accessible these types of jobs are. Here in the states we have McDonalds, and BurgerKing as another choice. These jobs are pretty accessible, and you really do not need much experience to fill them. The clientele here however are composed of the more common people, and your english is probably as good if not better than most of them. I wish you luck on whatever you decide, and please don't take the dog. :shock: He would be all alone while you are working , and roundabout. It would not be fair to him.
Il cuore dello stupido è nella sua bocca, ma la bocca del saggio è nel suo cuore.

Pacentro08
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Post by Pacentro08 » Mon Nov 22, 2010 12:14 pm

Just had to reply to Leenico, but needed a cup of tea to calm down first!

First of all, we do not have dialects in the UK any more, though we do have regional lexical items that are remnants of dialect. And of course we have regional accents.

Secondly, for some years, Dublin and Edinburgh have been the most popular places for Italians to visit for English language holidays.

Thirdly, while some accents are more difficult to follow than others, for native speakers as well as non-native speakers, to advise against visiting Scotland and Ireland on linguistic grounds is as ridiculous and offensive as advising English speakers not to visit Sicily or Alto-Adige - or any region. There are just as many parts of England that have marked regional accents.

Fourthly, it strikes me that Ember is a sufficiently keen anglophile to benefit from the cultural, social and linguistic aspects of a visit to Scotland or Ireland. It's just a pity Ember's not going now!

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Ember
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Post by Ember » Mon Nov 22, 2010 12:53 pm

Pacentro08 wrote:Fourthly, it strikes me that Ember is a sufficiently keen anglophile to benefit from the cultural, social and linguistic aspects of a visit to Scotland or Ireland. It's just a pity Ember's not going now!
Thank you :) well it's not that I'm not going at all... I have to re-organize the whole thing though! :wink:

Leenico, my parents always taught me that travelling and getting to know what's different, is the best way of learning... but they don't have to pay me the whole trip of course :D that's why I'm also looking for a job.

The fact is that I really like Scottish accent... plus, I find those places fascinating. That's why I prefer to go in Scotland (or Ireland). Of course, I also like England and Wales, I don't want to discriminate :lol:
U.S. would be ok too, of course. But I really hate to fly, and I don't want to fly alone for many hours because I'd go crazy. Sure I'll visit the USA one day, but with somebody else, not alone, and for a pure holiday :) a coast-to-coast would be cool!

P.S. my dog stays alone when I have my lessons (the whole afternoon usually) and it's not sad at all, she waits for me and then when I come back we spend a lot of good time together... she'd probably be really sad instead being for an entire month with others than me! That's why I prefer to have her with me when i travel for more than 10 days.
*** homo sum: humani nihil a me alienum puto ***

Pacentro08
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Post by Pacentro08 » Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:26 pm

Ember,

I think the UK now accepts an 'animal passport' which shows the animal has had necessary injections, but I don't know where to go for information - British Consulate website maybe? Sorry, I should have looked before I started writing this :wink: . Anyway, I'm pretty sure animals don't have to go into quarantine per forza.

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Ember
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Post by Ember » Mon Nov 22, 2010 2:09 pm

That's good... I've also heard that I can solve everything through my veterinarian (well... my dog's!! :D ) but it will take a few months.
Also, I have to find a place to stay where animals are allowed. It's not impossible, but it will be a little more laborious.
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leenico
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Post by leenico » Mon Nov 22, 2010 4:36 pm

Pacentro! I'm sorry if I have offended you to the point where is was necessary to have a cup of tea to calm yourself. You shouldn't allow these message boards to affect you to that extent. I have never been to Dublin, but I have had the pleasure of visiting Edinburgh. Although it was a lovely town I must admit that I had to keep a keen ear to understand everything that was said to me. We also do at times get some of the later Irish movies here in the states, and there again, you have to really listen well to understand everything. I am not attacking either one of these countries, but if I were to repeat their idioms & dialect as I hear them, I too would have a hard time being understood. At least here in the states. I was under the impression Ember wanted to bring her already remarkable command of the english language to a higher level.
Ember! Your parents are right. Traveling is one of the best, if not the only way of learning, as Pacentro puts it "the cultural, social and linguistic aspects" of the country your visiting.
Who pays for your trip is really none of my business. :D I was just making a joke, and I hope I haven't offended you also. The Scottish accent is quaint, as is the Irish accent. As a matter of fact, all languages have their own unique qualities that make them different.
I happen to love dogs, and it would sadden me to know that one was being neglected. My thoughts were that you would be working during the day, and at night you would be seeing the sights. Perhaps visiting bars, restaurants, places where you cannot always take a dog. I'm sure you know what is best. Enjoy yourself. I envy you. :D
Il cuore dello stupido è nella sua bocca, ma la bocca del saggio è nel suo cuore.

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Ember
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Post by Ember » Mon Nov 22, 2010 8:12 pm

leenico wrote:I happen to love dogs, and it would sadden me to know that one was being neglected. My thoughts were that you would be working during the day, and at night you would be seeing the sights. Perhaps visiting bars, restaurants, places where you cannot always take a dog. I'm sure you know what is best. Enjoy yourself. I envy you. :D
Don't worry! I'm Italian, we don't like to work :D just kidding, but of course I'd work part time or it would be impossible to see things :wink: I'm a dog lover and a animal-expert so my pets will never be mistreated :)
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-Luca-
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Post by -Luca- » Mon Nov 22, 2010 8:29 pm

Ember wrote:
Don't worry! I'm Italian, we don't like to work :D just kidding
haahahah

Don't say it , otherwise people could really believe it! :P
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

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