No Native Accent

Join us here for some fun chit chat, or share your opinions on rumours and gossip in the news. Beginners and advanced Italian speakers are all welcome!
Post Reply
User avatar
Davide
Posts: 627
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 8:38 pm
Location: UK

No Native Accent

Post by Davide » Fri Sep 24, 2010 9:48 pm

Ok, this is something I'm VERY interested in. My question is 'why is it almost impossible to achieve a native accent in a foreign language? By this, what I mean is what is it about one's speaking and intonation that betrays one's own nationality?
Yesterday I sent a recording of myself reading an Italian passage to a native Italian friend of mine and asked for his honest comments. His response was that my pronunciation was perfect and that he couldn't find anything to correct. Nevertheless, you can STILL tell that I'm a native English speaker (at least I think you can. What fascinates me, is, as I said, what exactly it is that betrays this. Does anyone have any insights/opinions on this? I'm going to continue listening to myself to see if I can discover the characteristics that give my nationality away!

User avatar
Peter
Posts: 2902
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 12:41 pm
Location: Horsham, West Sussex, England

Post by Peter » Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:34 pm

I hear what you say, Davide. I know that I speak Italian with an English accent; I simply cannot speak otherwise. Very frustrating, as is the fact that I know that my conversation skills have gone through the floor simply because there is no opportunity in my area to practice - no group as such exists. :cry:

User avatar
Davide
Posts: 627
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 8:38 pm
Location: UK

Post by Davide » Sat Sep 25, 2010 7:00 am

Thanks for the reply Peter. It's something that really interests me and I'm trying to define what these nationality betraying characteristics are.
As for conversation opportunities I know exactly what you mean. Have you tried an exchange with a native using Skype? I do this three times a week with a native Italian friend of mine and I've found that it really helps. If you're interested, you can try finding some one on the Mixxer language exchange site.

http://www.language-exchanges.org/

Unlike most sites of its ilk, you won't find yourself bombarded with 'Hello dear, I saw your profile and it interested me' type messages! :evil:

User avatar
coffeecup
Posts: 288
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 4:49 am
Location: Australia

Post by coffeecup » Sat Sep 25, 2010 9:09 am

You know, I completely understand what you are saying... I can always tell a foreign accent on the italian language when other people are speaking and i assumed I was the same, speaking Italian with an australian accent, but I have been told more than once that I speak Italian like a native (only in pronunciation, though, as my conversational skills are not flash for the same reason as Peter). I don't really believe it, but I can't tell myself. :?

I suppose one of the things that really helped me is that I used to listen to heaps of Italian songs and sing (somewhat badly, I'll admit!!) to all the lyrics. Now nearly all of the songs on my ipod are Spanish (albeit some are portugese and English). I've been told also that my pronunciation of Spanish song lyrics is pretty good considering that i don't know or speak much Spanish at all, but when I tried to say (rather than sing) the words, I could instantly hear my aussie accent.

Maybe I'm just weird... :wink:

User avatar
umberto
Posts: 443
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:39 pm
Location: Italy

Post by umberto » Sat Sep 25, 2010 1:59 pm

Davide, I wouldn’t really know why. I think it’s because our brain works in a selective way: when you’re born and start learning your own language, then you won’t accept any other language but yours. I also think that this process is very subjective and involves you, the person from whom you learn to speak (children mostly learn to speak from their mother, don’t they?) and all that surrounds you.

I have noticed that Spaniards are the only ones who can “imitate” the Italian accent so well that you wouldn’t make out the difference. Well, Spaniards have trouble in pronouncing the double consonants and in distinguishing the ò from the ó and the è from the é, but many Italians have the same troubles… They can’t even pronounce the syntactic gemination (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syntactic_gemination), but in Italy not everyone pronounces it, so, when I hear Spaniards speaking Italian – of course someone who’s lived here for a long time, one year at least, not someone who’s just arrived –, if I don’t think they come from Florence, I wouldn’t think they’re foreigners either.

Davide, since your written Italian is perfect, have you got Italian origins? I’m asking you this because I have met Italian native speakers living abroad (in Canada, above all): I’ve always had the impression they felt ashamed of their language, as if they considered it a folkloristic fake, just because it doesn’t sound like the Italian spoken in Italy.

User avatar
Davide
Posts: 627
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 8:38 pm
Location: UK

Post by Davide » Sat Sep 25, 2010 3:00 pm

Hi Umberto - yes my mum and dad were both Italian, but I was born in England and grew up with English as my native language. I can't imagine why Italians living abroad would be ashamed of their mother language. For me, it's the exact opposite - wanting to get to my Italian roots was my major reason for learning Italian in the first place - and part of my obsession with wanting to speak it as well as I possibly can.
However, this interest in having/not having a native accent is not borne from that desire alone; it's also from an academic fascination with what it is that makes a native sound 'native'. Sometimes, it can be very obvious. For example, I have heard English speakers with a good command of Italian speaking, bit listening to them I can say to myself 'ah, their vowels are not quite 'Italian' enough (for example they carry over English 'lazy' vowels into their speech. It's a pity there's no way to post the file I recorded on here, because I'd love to get comments from native Italians on this forum.

Benjameno
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 4:15 pm

Post by Benjameno » Sun Sep 26, 2010 6:14 pm

Il motivo è molto semplice. I bambini appena nati sono in grado di distinguere tra tutti i fonemi pronunciabili in tutte le lingue del mondo - però, man mano che maturano, imparano ad imitare l'accento della loro lingua materna ignorando i fonemi che non fanno parte della sua fonologia. Si abituano a muovere la bocca e la lingua in un determinato modo, alcuni dei loro muscoli si adattano a pronunciare senza fatica i suoni della lingua materna, e perdono completamente l'abilità di individuare le differenze tra i fonemi non presenti nel suo sistema fonologico.

Sin dalla nascita, ti sei familiarizzato con il sistema fonologico dell'inglese, che include alcuni fonemi comuni con l'italiano, ma esclude molti altri. I fonemi dell'inglese sono i tuoi punti di riferimento, la stregua alla quale valuterai per sempre i suoni dell'italiano e delle altre lingue straniere, e anche quando te ne accorgi di una differenza tra due fonemi, non puoi fare altro che un tentativo approssimativo di riprodurla, basato sulla tua conoscenza dell'inglese.

Poi, c'è la cadenza, che è tutta un'altra storia! :wink:
Last edited by Benjameno on Mon Sep 27, 2010 3:07 pm, edited 3 times in total.

User avatar
polideuce
Posts: 876
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2007 3:29 pm
Location: Salsomaggiore Terme
Contact:

Post by polideuce » Sun Sep 26, 2010 6:30 pm

Pensa che io, forte della mia "erre" moscia, pensavo di non avere un accento terribile; in Scozia mi hanno scoperto subito :D

Ti posso dire che i miei amici "anglofoni" residenti in Italia da molto tempo, mantengono un certo accento; è un modo di pronunciare alcuni suoni, o a volte mantengono la pronuncia di alcune lettere. Ho notato, per esempio, che molti anglofoni mantengono il suono della "g" sempre dura.
Per i francofoni, quando parlano in italiano, ho avuto per anni una vicina francese, in Italia da almeno vent'anni, che parlava un franco-italiano mescolando a molto francese poco italiano, mantengono molti suoni morbidi, o troncano alcune parole...

Alla fine della fola credo che Benjameno abbia ragione; è una questione di fonemi che assimili e che devi mandare a memoria per imparare a pronunciare in una lingua che non è tua, e a volte ci si dimentica, durante la conversazione, di pronunciarli come si è imparato a memoria :)

User avatar
Dottore No
Posts: 146
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2008 8:42 pm
Location: Boston, Massachustetts, USA

Post by Dottore No » Mon Sep 27, 2010 11:31 am

Anch'io sono stato affascinato sull'evoluzione delle lingue, i dialetti, e gli accenti regionali. Mi sono chiesto spesso se esistono nell'Australia (per esempio) le variazione significanti con la pronunci dell'inglese, come negli Stati Uniti. Il suono dell'inglese che e' parlato in Texas e molto diverso da quello che e' parlato in Massachusetts.
Slainte e cent'anni a tutti!

User avatar
-Luca-
Posts: 546
Joined: Thu Oct 07, 2010 3:08 pm
Location: Italia, Abruzzo

Post by -Luca- » Mon Nov 01, 2010 4:13 pm

Trovare una persona che pronunci alla perfezione una lingua straniera, è molto ma molto difficile.

Ho preso parte tempo fa ad un piccolo corso di inglese , tenuto da un'Insegnante che parla perfettamente Spagnolo, Inglese, Italiano e Francese.

Ma lei, essendo nata e vissuta in un paese Spagnolo, mantiene ancora alcune caratteristiche fonetiche della lingua latina.

Non ci si può fare nulla. Attenzione però : solo un orecchio attento e nativo può riconoscere quelle sfumature che ci rivelano la vera origine della persona che parla.

Io da Italiano ,per esempio, riconobbi le sue origini latine. Un inglese invece, che parla Italiano, difficilmente avrebbe colto questa sfumatura nella professoressa.

Il mio inglese parlato, per esempio, nonostante mi venga detto che è dotato di una buona pronuncia che si rifà discretamente a quella inglese, è facilmente riconoscibile da un english mothertongue.

La scorsa estate mentre passavo del tempo con i miei parenti australiani con cui parlo inglese, un tizio che non conoscevo, ci ha chiesto chi di noi fosse italiano. Questo perchè lui , essendo est-europeo, non comprendeva facilmente la tonalità della lingua e scambiava tutti e 3 noi come inglesi nativi.
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

User avatar
Ember
Posts: 1115
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:32 pm
Location: Urbino

Post by Ember » Mon Nov 08, 2010 2:39 pm

Conosco persone che vivono in Italia da 40 anni e oltre, e ancora hanno un accento straniero molto forte. Comunque non preoccupatevi, non è fastidioso, anzi! :)

Penso che un accento "nativo" italiano non esista neanche, noi abbiamo così tanti accenti...! :D
*** homo sum: humani nihil a me alienum puto ***

User avatar
Davide
Posts: 627
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 8:38 pm
Location: UK

Post by Davide » Mon Nov 08, 2010 3:36 pm

Ciao Ember - certo che esistono molti accenti diversi in Italia - ma scometto che nessuno direbbe, per esempio, parlando di te, 'Ah ecco, un inglese!!' :D
Skype: storebror2

Please identify yourself first before you add me.

User avatar
Ember
Posts: 1115
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:32 pm
Location: Urbino

Post by Ember » Mon Nov 08, 2010 6:10 pm

Eheh no, ma purtroppo allo stesso modo anche in Inghilterra capirebbero che sono Italiana :D solo che in Italia capiscono anche da dove provengo :wink:
*** homo sum: humani nihil a me alienum puto ***

Cresasso
Posts: 38
Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 3:45 pm

Post by Cresasso » Wed Nov 10, 2010 1:50 am

Io ho il problema opposto. Ho la stessa pronuncia ed intonazione di mia madre Aretina (ho passato <1 settimana ad Arezzo in tutta la mia vita) ma quando parlo, tendo a parlare Inglese ma tradotto parola per parola in Italiano.

Mi rimedio dopo qualche settimana in Italia, ma la lingua e` cosi`. Il cervello e` un'organismo plastico e vivente: bisogna nutrire ed esercitare le proprie abilita, senno si arrugginiscono....

Gli Spagnoli riescono ad intonare l'Italiano abbastanza bene, ma secondo me ancora meglio ci riescono i Catalani.

Mia moglie e` Americana, ma non ha per niente la pronuncia Americana. Si spaccia per Spagnola, cui e` stata la sua laurea!

Pacentro08
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:11 pm
Location: Cornwall, UK and Abruzzo, Italy

Post by Pacentro08 » Wed Nov 17, 2010 12:05 pm

Molto interessante questa discussione! Da quello che ho capito, è molto difficile acquisire un accento nativo se si inizia ad imparare una lingua straniera dopo i 14 anni. Guardate questo clip breve. Io da inglese, noto che a volte questi bambini pronunciano bene l'italiano e a volte no, ma hanno quelle vocali lunghe o addirittura i dittonghi di quelli della media/alta borghesia da superare, poverini!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips ... /9554.html

Sono d'accordo con Benjameno quando parla di fonemi ma non sono d'accordo con Luca quando dice
Non ci si può fare nulla. Attenzione però : solo un orecchio attento e nativo può riconoscere quelle sfumature che ci rivelano la vera origine della persona che parla.
Sono inglese ma ho capito subito dalla pronuncia che il nostro prete a Pacentro era spagnolo (a dir la verità era colombiano) e riconosco anche diversi accenti italiani regionali. Ma stranamente anche se sono nata e cresciuta in Scozia non azzecco mai la regione da dove proviene uno scozzese!

Ma vorrei incoraggiare tutti a continuare ad impegnarsi perchè si può avere una buona pronuncia - magari non al cento per cento - ma una buona parte del tempo. Bisogna fare esercizi di pronuncia davanti allo specchio per cambiare i movimenti e ascoltare moltissimo la lingua parlata. I suoni che identificano subito gli anglofoni e quelli più difficili da sradicare sono [o], [e], [t], [d] e [r] (specialmente le combinazioni [tr] [rt] [dr] e [rd]). Chiaramente ci sono altri suoni che alcuni trovano difficili ma sto parlando di quelli che parlano già bene l'italiano. Una volta acquisiti i suoni, rimane il problema dell'intonazione e credo che sia difficile se non si è in Italia.

Scusate, ho parlato troppo a lungo, ma è un argomento che mi affascina.




[/quote]

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests