Why do Italians use English vocabulary in their websites?

Join us here for some fun chit chat, or share your opinions on rumours and gossip in the news. Beginners and advanced Italian speakers are all welcome!
Post Reply
ironman9779
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 1:53 am
Location: USA

Why do Italians use English vocabulary in their websites?

Post by ironman9779 » Fri Nov 19, 2010 5:26 pm

I'm shopping around Italian websites and I keep coming across English words like "internet bookshop", "my account", "home", "help", "FAQ", and "politica della privacy"...

User avatar
Peter
Posts: 2902
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 12:41 pm
Location: Horsham, West Sussex, England

Re: Why do Italians use English vocabulary in their websites

Post by Peter » Fri Nov 19, 2010 5:57 pm

ironman9779 wrote:I'm shopping around Italian websites and I keep coming across English words like "internet bookshop", "my account", "home", "help", "FAQ", and "politica della privacy"...
It really should not be a surprise, for there has been a creeping influx of anglicisms over a number of years. Indeed there is a book, Inglese -Italiano 1:1 - tradurre o non tradurre le parole inglesi?, part of which I have read, which explores this phenomenon - unwelcome in some quarters to be sure.

User avatar
-Luca-
Posts: 546
Joined: Thu Oct 07, 2010 3:08 pm
Location: Italia, Abruzzo

Post by -Luca- » Fri Nov 19, 2010 8:43 pm

Aspetta che ti posto un nuovo thread al riguardo, scrivendoti dal mio nuovo notebook che ha un bel widescreen in dotazione full hd, con tanto di display led.

Vedi? l'inglese pian piano (sopratutto in alcuni ambiti) entra nella nostra lingua italiana...
Alcuni sono favorevoli, alcuni invece non lo sono.
Io sono uno di quelli poco favorevoli all'utilizzo di termini inglesi per l'Italiano..
Così facendo l'italiano piano piano si perde,e si perde l'identità del linguaggio.
Perchè i termini italiani non vengono utilizzati anche in Inghilterra? Perchè l'inglese è più conservatore, mentre l'italiano lo è meno.

L'essere poco conservatori da parte nostra porterà anno dopo anno all'estinzione di alcuni termini, e invece per altri termini non ci sarà nemmeno l'equivalente italiano.

Io sono un conservatore, e la mia lingua cerco di tenermela stretta, così come è giusto che un inglese si tenga stretta la sua.

Io voglio poter dire Schermo ad alta definizione anzichè display hd, senza che nessun tecnico di elettronica strabuzzi gli occhi.
Voglio che la mia lingua si mantenga.

Naturalmente mi piace molto l'inglese, ma non mi piace mischiare i termini.
L' "italish" (neologismo da me appena introdotto per esprimere Italiano + Inglese ) è di moda, è fashion, è cool, ma non mi piace :)
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

User avatar
Ember
Posts: 1115
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:32 pm
Location: Urbino

Post by Ember » Sat Nov 20, 2010 1:03 am

Neanche a me piace inglesizzare l'italiano... però penso anche che una lingua sia bella perchè è viva... bisogna essere creativi con le parole, ovviamente però senza sorvolare sugli errori!
*** homo sum: humani nihil a me alienum puto ***

User avatar
Davide
Posts: 627
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 8:38 pm
Location: UK

Post by Davide » Sat Nov 20, 2010 5:04 pm

What Italy needs is an academy to protect the language similar to that which exists in France - listening to Italian radio, I despair at the amount of English words that are rapidly creeping into the language - even when there is a perfectly good Italian equivalent......my pet hate? lo shopping - che vergogna! Grrrr :x
Skype: storebror2

Please identify yourself first before you add me.

Pacentro08
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:11 pm
Location: Cornwall, UK and Abruzzo, Italy

Post by Pacentro08 » Sat Nov 20, 2010 11:39 pm

There's an argument that says a language is strong and vibrant if it accepts change and neologisms from other languages, rather than creating (or at least trying to create) a fossilised language as the French try to do through their Academie Francaise (apologies any francophones, I don't know how to do a cedilla in an email).

Not sure I agree with this view entirely, but it's a thought.

I can understand, to some extent, the use of English words in the field of IT where allegedly English dominates, but it's less clear why it's necessary when there's a perfectly acceptable and used Italian word.

User avatar
BillyShears
Posts: 388
Joined: Thu Jun 14, 2007 5:49 pm
Contact:

Post by BillyShears » Sun Nov 21, 2010 3:55 am

Greetings friends,

I was considering writing a subject titled "Perché No" where I listed English words that are becoming part of the Italian language and ask why not consider an Italian word.

A sample:

In English "computer" may have derived from "to compute".
"to compute" = "computare" quindi perché no "il computo" (o il computante)
Davide wrote:What Italy needs is an academy to protect the language similar to that which exists in France ......my pet hate? lo shopping - che vergogna! Grrrr :x
I agree with Davide. The Italian "fare la spesa" sounds a lot better than "lo shopping". I understand the arguments for encouraging a living language but Italian is such a beautiful language I don't know why English has to be used in Italy to the extent that it is.

Italy has taken many measures to create one unified language at the expense of making extinct the many Latin/Italo/Greco derived languages/dialects (Neapolitan, Sicilian, etc.) spoken in Italy while allowing English words to become part of the language (at an alarming rate in my opinion) doesn't make sense to me.

BS
Impariamo.com has a Facebook page < https://www.facebook.com/impariamo.com >




Chi domanda non fa errori.

User avatar
coffeecup
Posts: 288
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 4:49 am
Location: Australia

Post by coffeecup » Sun Nov 21, 2010 6:06 am

I agree to a certain point.

I am Australian (and the only one in my family who studies language) and I do not like the English language.

Although it has a most fascinating history, and I adore English literature, I hate how English breaks so many of its rules. I also HATE seeing English-speaking people misuse English grammar and spelling. Fair enough for those with English as a second language (my heart goes out to them; English must be so hard to learn with all its broken rules and illogical words), but you would think that a person who has lived and breathed English all their life and knows no other language at all would be able to get their mother tongue correct.

As for "italish"..... hrmmm......

I study Italian and adore Italian because it gives me an avenue to escape English, strange as that sounds. However, these escapee English words that creep in when you are not looking really annoy me.

The only one that I tolerate is, in fact, "lo shopping"; the reason being that it is the only way I can distinguish between grocery shopping and retail therapy in Italian.

Despite this, I do not think that an Academy like the French one would solve the problem. To me that seems too regimented and totalitarian: "You can not use the following words under any circumstances......." Yeah, right. Besides, how would it be 'enforced'? If someone really wants to say "lo staff" instead of "il personale" who can stop them?

I also agree that a language needs to be able to grow, change and use new words. I can't imagine modern-day people running around saying "Wherefore art thou?", "Methinks thou shalt fail" and other such phrases from Old English.

But the question is.... how long until every second word in Italian is English?? Santo cielo!
без тебя я не я. нас никогда не догонят! я тебя люблю.

User avatar
Davide
Posts: 627
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 8:38 pm
Location: UK

Post by Davide » Sun Nov 21, 2010 9:17 am

I agree that it would be difficult to enforce rules - but from what I've read, it's not that the rules are enforced, it's more that the French language is 'protected' from many foreign imports because the French are (some would say, arrogantly) fiercely proud of their language and don't want to see it 'diluted'. Of course, languages change and evolve, but I don't think this need be at the expense of needlessly substituting native expressions for foreign ones. Unfortunately, it seems to be the price paid for English being such a dominant force. Of course, to a native Italian speaker, we must remember that such imports sound exotic, just as foreign words in the English language do - but to someone whose native language is English, hearing words such as 'lo shopping' and 'il fast food' really jar!
Skype: storebror2

Please identify yourself first before you add me.

User avatar
polideuce
Posts: 876
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2007 3:29 pm
Location: Salsomaggiore Terme
Contact:

Post by polideuce » Mon Nov 22, 2010 10:38 am

A mio avviso invece non è un male utilizzare parole estere qualora non via sia una parola, o un neologismo, analogo in italiano.
Specie per quanto riguarda l'informatica è inutile ricorrere a parole, per usare le analoghe francesi, come "ordinateur", "imprimante", "affiche", "sourir" etc... quando trattasi di apparecchi sviluppati e nati in ambito anglofono; altrimenti ogni volta bisogna ricorrere a traduzioni di settore per capire di cosa si sta parlando (l'uso di affiche per monitor, parola per altro latina, è ridicolo...)
Mi dà, invece, particolarmente fastidio il ricorso a termini inglesi quando esiste una parola italiana atta alla bisogna, come l'uso, per fare un esempio, di "device" al posto di "dispositivo"; mi fa pensare, più che a esterofilia conclamata, a un grave caso di ignoranza della lingua italiana

User avatar
-Luca-
Posts: 546
Joined: Thu Oct 07, 2010 3:08 pm
Location: Italia, Abruzzo

Post by -Luca- » Mon Nov 22, 2010 12:01 pm

Comunque poi dipende anche dalle situazioni.

Uno studente della vecchia scuola, intendo quella persona sulla cinquantina che non ha subito particolari influssi dalla lingua inglese, è solito utilizzare un italiano più solido, poco malleabile e diluibile da una lingua straniera (eccezion fatta per dei termini francesi, in quanto prima la lingua francese predominava l'inglese nell'insegnamento scolastico italiano..... ma comunque i termini adottati non sono tanti) , e molte volte , di fronte all'"italish" li troviamo molto impreparati . (giusto o sbagliato che sia)

Le persone che hanno una buona base di inglese,invece, tendono ad utilizzare con maggiore facilità dei termini inglesi piuttosto che i termini analoghi in lingua italiana.

Non sono d'accordo con alcuni che dicono che non esiste il termine analogo italiano, e che quindi ci si trova costretti a volte ad utilizzare il termine inglese.

shopping ? compere.

"Vado a fare compere oggi " E' una spesa generica, più indirizzata verso oggetti non alimentari...
"Vado a fare spesa oggi" E' una spesa meno generica, e nel gergo comune indica appunto l'0ambito alimentare. (provviste alimentari)

Il problema è che è facile utilkizzare shopping, perchè rende immediatamente l'idea.
Tutta colpa dei mass media. E' una sorta di emulazione la nostra, è una sorta di adeguamento alla massa che psicologicamente ci fa sentire "al passo" e non retrò, old fashion : non ci fa sentire FUORI MODA.
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

Pacentro08
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:11 pm
Location: Cornwall, UK and Abruzzo, Italy

Post by Pacentro08 » Mon Nov 22, 2010 12:24 pm

Parlando dei mass media (!), Luca mi ha fatto pensare a tutti quegli 'spot' pubblicitari alla tv che usano molte parole inglesi. Alcuni sono addirittura totalmente in inglese e questo mi sembra una strada molto rischiosa per la lingua italiana.

User avatar
umberto
Posts: 443
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:39 pm
Location: Italy

Post by umberto » Tue Nov 23, 2010 8:19 pm

polideuce wrote:A mio avviso invece non è un male utilizzare parole estere qualora non via sia una parola, o un neologismo, analogo in italiano.
Specie per quanto riguarda l'informatica è inutile ricorrere a parole, per usare le analoghe francesi, come "ordinateur", "imprimante", "affiche", "sourir" etc... quando trattasi di apparecchi sviluppati e nati in ambito anglofono; altrimenti ogni volta bisogna ricorrere a traduzioni di settore per capire di cosa si sta parlando (l'uso di affiche per monitor, parola per altro latina, è ridicolo...)
Mi dà, invece, particolarmente fastidio il ricorso a termini inglesi quando esiste una parola italiana atta alla bisogna, come l'uso, per fare un esempio, di "device" al posto di "dispositivo"; mi fa pensare, più che a esterofilia conclamata, a un grave caso di ignoranza della lingua italiana
Sono d'accordo. Sometimes we use an English word because there isn’t any equivalent one in Italian (for instance, how would you translate “feedback” into Italian, “impressione di ritorno”?!?). But sometimes the use of English is unjustified: so, if someone tells me “Buon week end”, I reply “Buon fine settimana anche a te!”.

User avatar
Davide
Posts: 627
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 8:38 pm
Location: UK

Post by Davide » Thu Nov 25, 2010 5:26 pm

Good for you Umberto - and if someone says 'ok?' to me, I respond 'va bene? :D
Skype: storebror2

Please identify yourself first before you add me.

User avatar
BillyShears
Posts: 388
Joined: Thu Jun 14, 2007 5:49 pm
Contact:

Post by BillyShears » Fri Nov 26, 2010 4:18 am

umberto wrote:Sometimes we use an English word because there isn’t any equivalent one in Italian (for instance, how would you translate “feedback” into Italian, “impressione di ritorno”?!?).
Amico mio,

Perché no, per esempio, "Dimmi la tua opinione." o "Dimmi della tua esperienza."?

BS
Impariamo.com has a Facebook page < https://www.facebook.com/impariamo.com >




Chi domanda non fa errori.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest