How do Italians treat death?

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umberto
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Post by umberto » Sat Apr 09, 2011 1:27 pm

Wow, what a merry topic! Seriously, I don’t think Italian funarals are so different from all the other funerals. You can be cremated or buried. Funerals are often arranged the day after the death, but not if the corpse has to undergo autopsy. In Florence funerals are never arranged on Sundays, so, please, do not die on Saturdays!!!

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-Luca-
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Post by -Luca- » Sat Apr 09, 2011 1:35 pm

We cry ...
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

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Peter
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Post by Peter » Sat Apr 09, 2011 1:49 pm

-Luca- wrote:We cry ...
What are you like, Luca!!!!!!!!!

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Chris Corbyn
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Post by Chris Corbyn » Sat Apr 09, 2011 1:57 pm

If what I've seen in Italian films is anything to go by, the process isn't vastly different from the rest of the western world. If you feel like testing your Italian:

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rito_funebre#In_Italia

Somebody has written a blog post making comparisons from their own experiences: http://www.beginningwithi.com/comments/ ... -of-death/

I've only attended funerals in England and Australia so I'm not sure what happens in the States, but basically the funeral will typically happen within a week or so of the death, during which time an autopsy may take place, preparations will be made, messages of condolence and flowers etc will arrive. There may be an open-casket viewing a day or two before the funeral itself, though increasingly this is not done, then the funeral procession takes place with eulogies given by people close to the deceased, finally followed by a party to celebrate the life of the deceased.

It sounds like in Italy the same happens, though in the case of the person who wrote that blog post there was no party after the funeral, so there may be a difference here.
Last edited by Chris Corbyn on Sat Apr 09, 2011 4:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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umberto
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Post by umberto » Sat Apr 09, 2011 4:10 pm

You have probably seen people clap their hands as soon as the coffin goes out of the Chrch. I know: this horrifies every foreigner! People clap their hands only if the person was very famous or died in an unexpected, unnatural and unfair way. On the contrary, we don’t give any party.

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-Luca-
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Post by -Luca- » Sat Apr 09, 2011 7:08 pm

Peter wrote:
-Luca- wrote:We cry ...
What are you like, Luca!!!!!!!!!
8) 8) :lol:
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

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Peter
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Post by Peter » Sat Apr 09, 2011 7:43 pm

umberto wrote:You have probably seen people clap their hands as soon as the coffin goes out of the Chrch. I know: this horrifies every foreigner! People clap their hands only if the person was very famous or died in an unexpected, unnatural and unfair way. On the contrary, we don’t give any party.
I honestly have never understood why people should feel horrified/ offended, whatever. To me it is a huge sign of respect for the deceased.

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-Luca-
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Post by -Luca- » Sat Apr 09, 2011 8:02 pm

Applaudire la salma è un grande segno di rispetto ; lo si può fare con tutti ovviamente, ma di solito l'applauso può partire quando il defunto è un giovane o un persona che nel corso della vita ha ricevuto il consenso di molti oppure in caso di morte improvvisa, o ancora in casi di meriti , e molti altri casi.

Naturalmente l'applauso può partire per qualunque defunto. E' una forma di rispetto.
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

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umberto
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Post by umberto » Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:40 am

This topic reminds me that we have another oddity: the so called “prefiche”, women not related to the dead person paid to cry at funerals.

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Peter
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Post by Peter » Sun Apr 10, 2011 5:28 pm

umberto wrote:This topic reminds me that we have another oddity: the so called “prefiche”, women not related to the dead person paid to cry at funerals.
I'm sorry but that is pretty sick. :shock: :shock:

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-Luca-
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Post by -Luca- » Sun Apr 10, 2011 6:03 pm

Peter wrote:
umberto wrote:This topic reminds me that we have another oddity: the so called “prefiche”, women not related to the dead person paid to cry at funerals.
I'm sorry but that is pretty sick. :shock: :shock:
Si, in effetti è strano, ma devo ammettere che questa era un'usanza di almeno 50 anni fa.
Non credo che ora si utilizzino ancora donne che piangono per i funerali :shock:
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

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Peter
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Post by Peter » Sun Apr 10, 2011 6:24 pm

-Luca- wrote:
Peter wrote:
umberto wrote:This topic reminds me that we have another oddity: the so called “prefiche”, women not related to the dead person paid to cry at funerals.
I'm sorry but that is pretty sick. :shock: :shock:
Si, in effetti è strano, ma devo ammettere che questa era un'usanza di almeno 50 anni fa.
Non credo che ora si utilizzino ancora donne che piangono per i funerali :shock:
Credo sinceramente di no, Luca!

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Ember
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Post by Ember » Thu Apr 14, 2011 10:28 am

Non dimentichiamo gli avvoltoi, che aspettano solo di vedere qualche faccia triste in ospedale per avvicinarsi, chiedere come va e quando subodorano un lutto imminente fare pubblicità alla propria agenzia di pompe funebri. E'successo a un mio amico e penso non sia il primo né l'ultimo a cui capita.

Comunque, di solito i defunti italiani vengono tumulati ma alcuni possono chiedere di essere cremati.
*** homo sum: humani nihil a me alienum puto ***

Pietru
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Post by Pietru » Thu Apr 14, 2011 11:36 am

Peter wrote:
umberto wrote:This topic reminds me that we have another oddity: the so called “prefiche”, women not related to the dead person paid to cry at funerals.
I'm sorry but that is pretty sick. :shock: :shock:
That used to be a fairly common practice in the UK. Professional mourners.

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