Cimitile

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ladybird
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Cimitile

Post by ladybird » Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:13 pm

Buonasera a tutti

My ancestors came from this town not far from Nola. I have been having a general look at it online to see what I can find out and I came upon this link on youtube. It translates as the undressed lily! :shock:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... 0p-rjQZguA
Does anybody have any idea of what it is all about - the curiosity is driving me nuts! (not to mention the noise from the video! :lol: )
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polideuce
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Re: Cimitile

Post by polideuce » Tue Oct 09, 2012 10:10 am

In studio non ho l'audio; prometto di guardarmelo a casa e di risponderti :)

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Re: Cimitile

Post by ladybird » Fri Oct 12, 2012 1:54 pm

polideuce wrote:In studio non ho l'audio; prometto di guardarmelo a casa e di risponderti :)
Non c'é fretta, sono solo curiosa! :)
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Quintus
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Re: Cimitile

Post by Quintus » Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:37 am

ladybird wrote:Buonasera a tutti

My ancestors came from this town not far from Nola. I have been having a general look at it online to see what I can find out and I came upon this link on youtube. It translates as the undressed lily! :shock:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... 0p-rjQZguA
Does anybody have any idea of what it is all about - the curiosity is driving me nuts! (not to mention the noise from the video! :lol: )
Ciao ladybird,

As I expected, I was not able to understand the words of the song in the video you posted, not even by means of my headphones. It's a very difficult dialect, i.e a very different local language. We improperly use the word dialect to indicate a language that differs from Italian for most of its features, while we use the term "vernacular" to mean a slightly modified version (which, in turn you properly call dialect) of the official language. A native from those lands would be needed to do the job. It's a pity we don't have one. However, I found a lot of informations on the Festa dei Gigli. There's an astonishing amount of documents all over the internet about this feast, of which I wasn't aware, myself. I collected some informations and summarized them here. It has been a good occasion to learn something for me too.

I divided this message in two parts because the traditional Festa dei Gigli was originally celebrated in the city of Nola on 22 June. I will call this original version "Feast of the Lilies" to keep it distinguished from the "Feast of the Undressed Lily", which is the title of the video you posted. They are basically the same thing but the latter is a bit different in nature.

"Lily" is the name given to one of those towering objects similar to lattice structures, or obelisks, that you saw in the video. A lily is made with wood and other relatively lightweight materials. It is typically 80 feet high. You find more
technical informations in the note [1] at the bottom of this post.


(A) La festa dei gigli tradizionale - The traditional Feast of the Lilies

I found almost all the following informations in this article:

http://www.nuvla.it/index.php?option=co ... &Itemid=68

The traditional Feast of the Lilies always takes place on June 22 in Nola. That day has to be Sunday, otherwise the feast is postponed to the next Sunday. The preparation of those structures of wood takes several weeks and sees a lot of people involved in it. The period of time that is needed to get all the necessary operations accomplished can be divided into three stages. At the beginning of the last stage, one week before the day 22, the construction of the lilies is terminated. At this stage, each lily still looks like a nude, bare lattice of wood (i.e, undressed). The lilies are transported in this, let's say, undressed state, from their manufacturing locations to some posts in the proximity of the square from where they will start being carried through the streets of the city. This transportation takes place traditionally one week before June 22. There are videos and articles on the web where you may read "la prima alzata del giglio spogliato". If the date of these articles and videos is one or some weeks before June 22, they probably refer to the time of the above said transportation, to which people attend as if it were the day of the feast. The keyword is "prima alzata", that is "first raising". In the facts, the term "alzata" is idiomatically used to indicate not only the physical act of lifting the lily off the ground, but also its being carried around the city. Instead, "la festa del giglio spogliato" has another meaning, as I said above. I will try to talk about it in the part (B).

The lilies will be be dressed with flowers, flags and papier-maché bas reliefs some days before the feast. A dressed lily can be seen here:

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gigli4.jpg

The celebrations of June 22 start early in the morning and are religious in nature. Who builds these lilies? The lilies
are built by Nola's "corporazioni". In this case, a "corporazione" is to be understood as a guild (or craft-guild), i.e an
association of craftsmen. The Nola guilds traditionally engaged in this feast are those of Greengrocers (Ortolani), Cold Meat Grocers (Droghieri), Publicans (Tavernieri), Bakers (Panettieri), Carpenters (Falegnami), Gravediggers (Becchini), Cobblers (Calzolai), Blacksmiths (Fabbri) and Tailors (Sarti). Each guild appoints one of its members as Maestro di festa (Feast Master). He accepts to be charged with the construction expenses (all Nola people offer their contribution though), takes part in the design of its lily, discusses the project with the builders, sets up a Feast Committee for the collection of funds, chooses colors and flags for its Committee and selects a group of men which are going to be charged with the lily transportation task.

This group of men is called "paranza". In other words, each lily is carried by one team of men which, instead of being denominated by the usual term "gruppo" (group) or "squadra" (team), is called "paranza". A "paranza", in Italian, was a particular type of sailing ship used only for fishing, a very beatiful one (these beatiful ships are long gone). So, I reckon these men would claim "we are a paranza" in the sense "we are like the crew of a paranza".

Each paranza, just as any ship, does also have a name. The name of the paranza shown in the video of your link is "(L')Indistruttibile" [(The) Indestructible]. The number of men used to carry a lily is high enough to allow them to have their lily swaying or, as they say, "ballare", that is dancing. For this ability of theirs, these men are called "cullatori". "Cullare" means "to cradle", so this term could be translated into "cradlers" (which seems not to exist in English though, as well as cullatore is not a regular Italian word), or "the men who cradle the lily".

In Nola, there are four "botteghe" that specialize in building these structures of wood. A "bottega" is an Italian word that means shop/store, but it is used also for laboratory/workshop. As an example of this, we have the botteghe degli orafi on the Ponte Vecchio, here in Florence - our sole botteghe left by now. The botteghe of Nola are tenaciously carrying on with the lily tradition since 1700.

The festa dei Gigli is religious in nature. The first historical note on it, along with a decription of the lilies, is found in the "De Nola Patria" book (a Latin title for "About Nola Country Home"), written by Ambrogio Leone and published in Venice in 1514.

In his book the Author says that the feast was [and still is] dedicated to San Paolino, a saint who is not to be confused with Saint Paul. Paolino (that would be Little Paul, sort of) was born in Nola in 354 AD. He was a Latin poet and writer. His original name was Pontius Meropius Anicius Paulinus (what a beautiful name!), as you can read in the following article in English:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paulinus_of_Nola

Leone's book reads:

«Il giorno prima della festa di S. Paolino, si fa un altro giro per la città: prima vanno i contadini con falci,
[The day before Saint Paolino's feast one goes once more around the city: the Farmers, with sickles in their hands, go
first]

seguendo, come fosse il loro vessillo, una grandissima torcia a guisa di colonna, accesa e adorna di spighe di grano.
[following, as if it were their banner, a very tall torch shaped as a pillar, lit and adorned with ears of wheat.]

Questa torcia è tanto grande che un sol uomo non può portarla, onde è portata da parecchi ritta su una specie di cataletto.
[This torch is so big that one man can't bring it, thus it is vertically mounted on a sort of trestle (or pedestal) which is
brought by several men.]

Viene fatta col denaro raccolto fra i contadini, e ogni anno si accresce, non solo viene rifatto ciò che brucia percorrendo
[It is built thanks to the money collected among the farmers, and every year it becomes bigger, as they don't limit to
restore the part of it that burnt while going]

la città. La chiamano cereo. Similmente si fa altra torcia da altri, e in questa processione ciascuno segue la sua, [through the city. They call it "cereo" (that would be "cero", candle/taper). Similarly, others build more of them (ie, each guild has its own torch built), and in this procession everyone follows his/hers own,]

mandandola avanti a sé. Viene poi il cero degli ortolani, adorno di cipolle e di agli, dietro cui vanno gli ortolani,
[having it moving along before him/her. Then the Greengrocers' candle comes, adorned with onions and garlics, behind which the Greengrocers walk,]

e di poi gli altri ceri degli artigiani. Dopo di questi vengono le file dei monaci e le file dei sacerdoti chierici,
[and after this one, the candles of the other craftsmen. After these, there are the lines of Monks and Clergyman's suit,]

l'ultimo dei quali è il Vescovo, che porta in mano le reliquie degli Apostoli, del legno della croce, di alcuni martiri
[the last of whom is the Bishop, who holds in his hand relics of Apostles, wood from the Cross, some Martyrs]

e di S. Paolino, chiuse in una mano d'argento. Accompagnano il Vescovo il Conte e il Maestro del mercato, di poi i
[and S. Paolino, all of them enclosed into a silver hand. The Count and the Market Master come along with the Bishop, then the]

primari cittadini e il rimanente popolo, tutti a piedi.»
[notables and finally the rest of the people, all of them walking.]

Nowadays, the religious stage of the feast is followed by a competition among the lilies. It's not a race, that would be impossible, of course. A panel awards honors to the lily that performed better taking into account everything, i.e its look, songs, the paranza's skills, and so forth.

Everything I've been talking about so far is explained in much more detail by the nuvla.it article of which I posted a link at the top of this message. The language used by Nola people to describe their feast and everything happening there is dense with idioms and special meanings, in addition to the fact that they speak in a very difficult dialect, even though they use to do that only when speaking among themselves, otherwise they are able to speak Italian as any other.

Although the city of Nola created the tradition of The Feast of Lilies, this feast is celebrated even in other adjoining municipalities, for example Crispano, Brusciano, Cimitile (and others), and in Neaples itself, in a district of it named
Barra.

The following video shows three lilies in the Duomo square in Naples. Two of them are stationary near the front of a
palace, while the third one performs an exhibition 30 minutes long. This video will make it clear what I was meaning with "dancing" and "cradling". This lily is supposed to be built by the corporazione of Calzolaio (i.e, the Guild of Cobblers). From the movie time 13:27 on, the scene looks pretty surreal due to the sunset light. It might worth having a look to it if you like folklore:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCb0mroo ... creen&NR=1

This movie was taken in Nola in 2012. It relates to the "prima alzata" of an undressed lily:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2t_5_brV ... re=related

These one shows a dressed lily while turning around a difficult corner in the ancient center of Nola. Paranza FT means
paranza "Fantastic Team".
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmFMAzNU ... re=related

These ones, always from Nola, show dressed lilies. These movies were probably taken just the day of the S. Paolino feast:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3nVJcso ... creen&NR=1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_xquEqh ... r_embedded


(B) La festa del giglio spogliato - The Feast of the Undressed Lily

As I said, the religious tradition originally initiated by Nola inhabitants expanded, and people from several other municipalities were celebrating this feast for almost all the past century. It recently happened that people from several towns started building lilies and making a parade of them even in days other than 22 June. The date shown in the original video at the beginning of this thread is September 2011, 15th. That lily was never dressed. It alone was carried around the city of Cimitile that day.
This means that the religious side of the feast was missing, as well as any competition with other paranze. The reason why people started with this habit is imo because, as you see, they actually have a lot of fun with the numerous activities surrounding the construction and exhibition of these structures. Staying all together, writing music and lyrics, singing songs, taking pictures and movies, posting articles and messages to the web, cutting DVDs, to say nothing of the impact of social networks on all of this, is what those people seem loving over the original meaning carried by those structures.

By the way, this proliferation of the exhibitions pushed some majors to withhold feast committees the permission to use the public ground for carrying around their lilies. This fact aroused an amazingly large amount of polemics on the web. On their hand, majors maintain that such proliferation would belittle the tradition, which is going to be considered a cultural value even by UNESCO. On their hand, people love having fun and don't give a damn about the cultural aspect of the feast. The situation is complicated by the fact that Nola people's opinions about the problem look like this "It's time for everybody to stop with such a mess. The Festa del Giglio has to come back home. It started from here and shall return here. We're the ones legitimately entitled to take care of our tradition". I'd prefer to skip reporting what the others replied to them on a multitude of forums and blogs.

-

A Conclusive Note.

In alcuni testi di canzoni scritte per la Festa dei Gigli gli autori usano espressioni di grandissimo amore per i propri gigli, espressioni che talvolta suonano a dir poco sorprendenti. But after reading many of them one starts understanding that these words of love are only apparently directed to those structures of wood. Those words are for Nola. It's Nola the woman they fell in love with, Nola, who welcomes her sons with "her warm embrace". Lilies are Nola, Nola is their lily. I started understanding this simple truth when, while navigating through a sea of surprising and odd things, I read that title "De Nola Patria". Patria, it's unusual for a writer in Latin of 1500 to use this word for a city. One would use it for a country. If he uses it for a city, there must be something underneath.

Spero di avere soddisfatto almeno in parte la tua curiosità, ma la quantità di scritti sulla Festa dei Gigli è impressionante, e questo potrebbe essere solo il punto di partenza.

Ciao,
Quintus

-----------------------------------------------------------

[1]
This article

(a)
http://old.cini.it/it/pubblication/page/81

informs us that one undressed structure weighs about 2,000 kilograms (4,400 pounds [1Kg = 2.2 lbs]). When dressed with decorations and ornaments its weigh rises to 4,000 kilograms (8,800 pounds). The following article

(b)
http://www.igigli.org/festa/ballata/

shows a drawing with the layout of the base, how the bearers are arranged along its perimeter and the number of them. We can count 112 bearers (the article in (a) says 120, but the diagram in (b) is imo more accurate). So, each bearer is loaded with 4,000/120 = 33 kilograms (about 73 lbs). It's not a very big weigh, although one must be sturdy and well trained to bring it around for hours. I couldn't find reports about accidents happened handling these structures. It would seem that none of them came ever down. This could be explained by the distribution of masses along the vertical axis of the lily. If you watch it on the videos, you may note that the lower part of the structure is much heavier than the rest, thanks to its width and probably to the type of wood used for it. Also, the people standing on the base could be there not only for playing and singing. Indeed, some of them seem doing nothing: their only task could be to shift the barycentre of the structure as close to ground as possible.

The above article (a), written in a excellent Italian, is entitled "Sui limiti del concetto di folklore musicale: la musica
per i Gigli di Nola". It is a very exhaustive source of informations either about the music for the Nola lilies and many
other features of them.

It reads (translated excerpt):

«La canzone per l’alzata - The song for the raising
The most important song is the one called "of the raising", which is carried out when the bearers have to lift the lily off the ground and move it into the procession holding that very heavy machine on their shoulders. Because of its big weigh, the operation of "raising" occurs very frequently, since the bearers couldn't stand it for a long time. So, they must lay it down often. Moreover, the unique way to correct an imprecise movement of the lily is laying it down and starting again with small, subsequent corrections. To coordinate this big collective effort which involves more than one hundred men, a music able to favour the synchronism of their movements is needed. This music must contain an effective "rhythmic signal", one able to be decoded and understood by all bearers. An additional purpose of this musical signal is to encourage and galvanize them during their considerable and repeated efforts. Hence this music must be composed according to criterions based on the Nola traditions which are more easy for them to interiorize. Indeed, it was reported that music written by non-Nola composers, although authoritative and expert in the Campania region traditional songs, did not lead to the expected results. As an example, here's the song for the Raising of the Greengrocers' Lily - Festa 2005, live recording. The paranza name is "Fantastic Team", lyrics and music are by Fantastic Team too. You can hear that the song starts right after the paranza chief commands: "Vai con la seconda" (Go with the second one). After an instrumental introduction performed by a sax and other instruments, one singer sings two stanzas and another singer two refrains. Upon the end of the second refrain, an acoustic signal is released, indicating to the bearers that the time to raise the lily all together has come»

Good chances are that my translation (into Italian) of the following lyrics is correct, thanks to the fact that I found a written text. You can hear this song by scrolling the page of the article (a) until you see the title "ESEMPIO DI CANTO PER L’ALZATA" and a "Play" button beneath it. Click it first and then the little round "Play" green button that gets shown.


ESEMPIO DI CANTO PER L’ALZATA (presentazione del Giglio Ortolano 2005)

1º Singer - 1º Stanza

Si fossi nu scienziato ne facesso
{Se fossi uno scienziato io farei}
[If I were a scientist I would turn]

e sta passione nosta mmericina
{di questa nostra passione una medicina}
[this passion of ours into a medicine,]

a goccia a goccia nu poco a sera o desso
{a goccia a goccia un poco per sera la darei}
[(and) drop by drop, a little every night, I'd give it]

a chi vo bbene ancora a S. Paulino
{a chi vuol bene ancora a S. Paolino}
[to those who still love Saint Paolino,}

a chi vulesso pace pe durmì
{a chi volesse dormire in pace}
[(and) to those who may want to sleep in peace]


2º Singer - 1º Refrain

Vulesso di,
{Lo vorrei dire,}
[I'd want to say it,]

vulesso dicere accussì
{lo vorrei dire così}
[I'd want to say it like this:]

che bello nn’anz’o ggiglio a te penzà
{che bello pensare a te di fronte al giglio}
[how beautiful it's to think of you before the lily,]

crerenno ca staje cca’
{crederebbero che sei qui}
[one could think you're here]
->(It's not clear who's this "you". Seemingly, it's S. Paolino)


1º Singer - 2º Stanza

Si foss’o core m’pietto e sta paranza
{Se io fossi il cuore nel petto di questa paranza}
[If I were the heart into the chest of this paranza]

sbattesso sempe forte tutto l’anno
{batterei sempre forte per tutto l'anno}
[I'd always beat strong all year long]

dieci anni e vita è overo nun so’ tanti
{dieci anni di vita, è vero, non sono tanti}
[ten years of life, that's true, aren't so much]

ma è tempo ca tirassimo dduje cunti
{ma è tempo che facciamo due conti}
[but its time for us to do our sums:]

nuje mmiezz’ a festa 'nce sapimmo sta’
{noi, in mezzo alla festa, ci sappiamo stare}
[we are absolutely capable of taking part in this feast]
->('nce does not mean "non ci" as it might seem. It means "ne ce" = of it here, and can be simply translated to "ci")
->(the sense is: although our paranza formed only ten years ago, we should be aware that we are at all capable of playing this game)


2º Singer - 2º Refrain

Vulesso di,
{Lo vorrei dire,}
[I'd want to say it,]

vulesso dicere accussì
{Lo vorrei dire così}
[I'd want to say it like this:]

sott’i lignammo fremm na realtà
{sotto il legname costruiremo una realtà}
[under the lumber we'll build a reality]

fantastica |the acoustic signal happens here| sarà
{(che) sarà fantastica}
[which is going to be a fantastic one]

---

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ladybird
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Re: Cimitile

Post by ladybird » Tue Oct 23, 2012 5:50 pm

An amazing and comprehensive reply Quintus, thank you so much! I am going to print this off and read it at my leisure.

Sorry I haven't been around, I haven't been too well otherwise I would have popped in to say grazie before now. :D
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Quintus
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Re: Cimitile

Post by Quintus » Wed Oct 24, 2012 4:35 pm

Non preoccuparti per quello. Spero invece che la mia lunga tirata sia almeno comprensibile. E molti auguri per la tua salute.

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ladybird
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Re: Cimitile

Post by ladybird » Fri Apr 12, 2013 10:55 pm

Una domanda semplice ragazzi :D

Il titolo di questo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZAU_Rn4-9Ko, che cosa significa "vico mos Cece 1"?

La stessa cosa ma un inserto diverso! C'é una buona ragione per la mia domanda :wink:
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Quintus
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Re: Cimitile

Post by Quintus » Sat Apr 13, 2013 12:00 am

Please look at the video's first frames. It should be:

Girate vico Mons. Cece (1)

Girate
IMO "girate" is a noun and means "turns". Alternatively it could be an imperative (to many), "turn!", but I think is a noun here. In fact, as you saw in the past, a "turn" is always a complex maneuver for a "Lily".

vico
vico is the ancient form of "vicolo", alley

Mons.
Mons. is the short form of Monsignor or Monsignore, the religious title for a bishop (e.g. the equivalent of "Sir" for an officer)

Cece
A cece is a chickpea, but surely is the bishop's second name here, which in turn is the denomination of the alley.

(1)
This could be the video's numerical ID

So, the title should mean:

"[The show of our lily's] Turns (to) Monsignor Cece's Alley"
La stessa cosa ma un inserto diverso! C'é una buona ragione per la mia domanda :wink:
Oh, sure, I bet there's a good reason for that. I hope you will remember your friends when you find the treasure you're looking for under Cimitile's Mons. Cece's alley's ancient stones :wink: :D

-
http://www.scuolastataletasso.it/ALLEGA ... escovo.pdf


Quintus

-

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ladybird
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Re: Cimitile

Post by ladybird » Sat Apr 13, 2013 2:01 pm

Quintus wrote:Please look at the video's first frames. It should be:

Girate vico Mons. Cece (1)

Girate
IMO "girate" is a noun and means "turns". Alternatively it could be an imperative (to many), "turn!", but I think is a noun here. In fact, as you saw in the past, a "turn" is always a complex maneuver for a "Lily".

vico
vico is the ancient form of "vicolo", alley

Mons.
Mons. is the short form of Monsignor or Monsignore, the religious title for a bishop (e.g. the equivalent of "Sir" for an officer)

Cece
A cece is a chickpea, but surely is the bishop's second name here, which in turn is the denomination of the alley.

(1)
This could be the video's numerical ID

So, the title should mean:

"[The show of our lily's] Turns (to) Monsignor Cece's Alley"
La stessa cosa ma un inserto diverso! C'é una buona ragione per la mia domanda :wink:
Oh, sure, I bet there's a good reason for that. I hope you will remember your friends when you find the treasure you're looking for under Cimitile's Mons. Cece's alley's ancient stones :wink: :D

-
http://www.scuolastataletasso.it/ALLEGA ... escovo.pdf


Quintus

-
Come sempre, grazie della spiegazione Franco. Allora, la ragione per la domanda..pensi che sia tesoro sepolto? :shock:

Magari.. :wink: . Il cognome della mia famiglia é Cece, forse ci ho dei parenti! Dei anni fa avevo intenzione di venire a sapere ma non era possibile, non c'era abbastanza tempo. Forse nel future..
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