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Weather Terms and Phrases

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2006 3:28 pm
by Roby
Weather
Weather terms and phrases

Fare, 'to do' or 'to make', is also used in a number of expressions, eg to talk about the weather:

Che tempo fa oggi? What's the weather today?,
What is the weather like?
Com'e il tempo? How is the weather?
Fa bel tempo. It's (nice) beautiful weather.
Fa brutto tempo It's awful (ugly) weather.
Fa freddo It's cold
Fa fresco It's cool
Fa caldo It's hot
Piove It's raining
Nevica It's snowing
C'e il sole It's sunny
E' nuvoloso It's cloudy
Tira vento It's windy
C'e la nebbia It's foggy
E' afoso, C'e afa It's muggy
E' sereno It's clear

air .....l'aria
barometer.... il barometro
blizzard.... la tormenta
climate .....il clima
cloud... la nuvola
cloudburst... il temporale
cloudy... nuvoloso
dew... la rugiada
dusk.... il crepuscolo
fog ....la nebbia
frost... il gelo
hail... la grandine
ice ...il ghiaccio
lightning... il lampo
mist l...a foschia
moon... la luna
northeast wind ....la tramontana
precipitation ...la precipitazione
rain (noun) ....la pioggia
rain (verb).... piovere
snow.... la neve
southwest wind.... il vento australe
storm ...la tempesta
sun ...il sole
weather report.... il bollettino meteorologico

Roby

Posted: Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:45 pm
by Roby
The weather is expressed with the verb FARE.

Fa bel tempo. --It's beautiful
Fa fresco.--It's cool.

You can express the weather in the past or in the future

Ieri pioveva--Yesterday it was raining
Domani nevichera' ---Tomorrow it will snow.
Quest'anno ha fatto bel tempo. ---This year the weather has been beautiful.

When referring to climate in general use ESSERE.

Il caldo e' insopportabile. ---The heat is unbearable.
In Italia il tempo e' sempre bello. The weather is always beautiful in Italy.

Roby

Posted: Mon Oct 15, 2007 1:58 pm
by squeaka
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Glad i stumbled upon it

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Re: Weather Terms and Phrases

Posted: Mon Dec 17, 2007 8:06 pm
by jade
Hi Roby,

Reading your posts here reminds me a question, but not sure if it is the right place to ask, I apologize if it is not.

You are talking about the weather fa freddo or fa caldo, now if with verb avere, do freddo and caldo have to change to their musculine and feminine forms?

For example:

Lei ha freddo.
Lui ha paura.

Are they correct?

Thanks.

Re: Weather Terms and Phrases

Posted: Mon Dec 17, 2007 11:51 pm
by Roby
jade wrote:Hi Roby,

Reading your posts here reminds me a question, but not sure if it is the right place to ask, I apologize if it is not.

You are talking about the weather fa freddo or fa caldo, now if with verb avere, do freddo and caldo have to change to their musculine and feminine forms?

For example:

Lei ha freddo.
Lui ha paura.

Are they correct?

Thanks.
Jade,

They are correct. With the verb avere, things do not have to agree. With the verb essere, things must agree. Example.:

Sono stanca quindi vado a nanna. Female speaker.
Sono stanco quindi vado a nanna . Male speaker.

Re: Weather Terms and Phrases

Posted: Tue Dec 18, 2007 1:26 am
by jade
Roby wrote:
jade wrote:Hi Roby,

Reading your posts here reminds me a question, but not sure if it is the right place to ask, I apologize if it is not.

You are talking about the weather fa freddo or fa caldo, now if with verb avere, do freddo and caldo have to change to their musculine and feminine forms?

For example:

Lei ha freddo.
Lui ha paura.

Are they correct?

Thanks.
Jade,

They are correct. With the verb avere, things do not have to agree. With the verb essere, things must agree. Example.:

Sono stanca quindi vado a nanna. Female speaker.
Sono stanco quindi vado a nanna . Male speaker.
Thanks Roby, Is essere the only verb to have subject and object to agree to each other?

In English, we say "I am cold" - I need to wear a jacket and "I have cold" - I am sick, are both sentences translated to "Ho freddo" in Italian?

Posted: Tue Dec 18, 2007 7:15 am
by polideuce
il primo caso:
"I am cold" - I need to wear a jacket
si traduce come "ho freddo"

il secondo caso
"I have cold" - I am sick
"sick" si traduce come "malato", in questo caso "cold" si traduce con "raffreddore" ovvero: "ho il raffreddore" :)

Posted: Tue Dec 18, 2007 10:35 pm
by jade
polideuce wrote:il primo caso:
"I am cold" - I need to wear a jacket
si traduce come "ho freddo"

il secondo caso
"I have cold" - I am sick
"sick" si traduce come "malato", in questo caso "cold" si traduce con "raffreddore" ovvero: "ho il raffreddore" :)
Ah yes, thank you, polideuce. Silly me, I was thinking in English again. raffreddore is the word.

Posted: Thu Oct 02, 2008 12:15 pm
by wiseness
Thanks Roby :)

Very very helpful.... I learn Italian through self teaching methods and through posts such as yours... it makes this process much, much easier.....

Keep up the good work....!!