LEARNING ITALIAN:WORDS OF ENCOURAGEMENT

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Davide
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LEARNING ITALIAN:WORDS OF ENCOURAGEMENT

Postby Davide » Mon Jun 13, 2011 9:48 pm

Roby:

Hello friends!

Why is it that so many people who want to learn Italian
never get to speak well? Most people will tell you it's one of 3 reasons...

1) "I'm just not good at languages".

Actually, we're all wired for languages, after all most of
us had no trouble with the first one.

Did you know that somewhere between 60% and 75% of
the world's population speak 2 or more languages?

2) Others will blame their age...

Like Danny Glover in Lethal Weapon, I'm too old
for this %&^$...

Well, an eminent neurologist research suggests that brain aging is a myth.

Good news for us that aren't exactly spring chickens.

3) Some people think, if I just conjugate more verbs and
learn even more grammar rules, I'll finally get it.

Well, I think Albert Einstein said it best...

Insanity: Doing the same thing over and over again and
expecting different results.

You see, these are not the real reason so many people
fail at learning Italian.

Simply put, it's the approach that's all wrong. By making small
changes in how you go about learning, you suddenly discover
everything starts falling into place. You realize that you aren't
the problem after all, it's the way you were taught that is the
problem. You find out that you actually do have an ability for
language and everything you hoped to be able to do with
Italian is within your reach...and best of all, you're definitely
not too old.






I completely agree with you about wrong approaches as a major cause of failure. I also think it's a question of attitude. The biggest problem with adults learning languages is that they expect to be able to express themselves in a foreign language in a complex fashion within a few months - when this doesn't happen, they give up. I think people need to accept that when you start learning a new language you have to go back to thinking like a child and not expect to be able to talk about the theory of relativity after 2 weeks of study :)
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Monika
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Location: Florida

Postby Monika » Mon Jun 13, 2011 10:44 pm

Davide wrote:The biggest problem with adults learning languages is that they expect to be able to express themselves in a foreign language in a complex fashion within a few months - when this doesn't happen, they give up. I think people need to accept that when you start learning a new language you have to go back to thinking like a child and not expect to be able to talk about the theory of relativity after 2 weeks of study :)


This is such a good point. I see this in my adult music students all the time. Most children accept that small failures are natural and part of the learning process. They're used to stumbling around, finding their way, trying again and again, whether just practice or finding a new approach. Children don't take mistakes/imperfections to heart and then conclude that they themselves are failures. But adults tend to be very hard of themselves, and do exactly that. I totally agree with you that it helps to consider the mindset of a child's way of learning!

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Peter
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Postby Peter » Fri Jun 17, 2011 2:26 pm

Monika wrote:
Davide wrote:The biggest problem with adults learning languages is that they expect to be able to express themselves in a foreign language in a complex fashion within a few months - when this doesn't happen, they give up. I think people need to accept that when you start learning a new language you have to go back to thinking like a child and not expect to be able to talk about the theory of relativity after 2 weeks of study :)


This is such a good point. I see this in my adult music students all the time. Most children accept that small failures are natural and part of the learning process. They're used to stumbling around, finding their way, trying again and again, whether just practice or finding a new approach. Children don't take mistakes/imperfections to heart and then conclude that they themselves are failures. But adults tend to be very hard of themselves, and do exactly that. I totally agree with you that it helps to consider the mindset of a child's way of learning!


I agree with both Davide and Monika. I know that I am very hard on myself, yet I know I shouldn't be. I guess it's the way we're wired as we get older. I've been learning Italian for getting on for 17 years and I still make the most idiotic mistakes, as a result of which I chew myself to death. Then perspective kicks in and I move on.

Many of those whose first language is English and who give up think it is easy to learn another language, not appreciating how different languages are - and thereby how interesting they are. Saying that, though, I have come across many who simply could not get their heads round how different Italian is, with its genders, verb declensions, the use of the subjunctive (almost extinct in English), the use of pronouns and so on ad infinitum.

Notwithstanding the odd frustration (mmm... maybe a tad too frequent to be 'odd'! :) ), I still consider learning Italian one of the best things that I have done, not least because it has in turn helped me to greatly appreciate Italian culture, the way Italians live, etc. :D
A presto


Peter

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coffeecup
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Postby coffeecup » Sat Jun 18, 2011 5:30 am

I think another major aspect to consider is how much someone actually likes the language they're studying (or likes language at all).

Most if you know I adore language and dream of speaking a million different ones, but my brother is the TOTAL opposite. When I made a poster of the Russian alphabet and put it on my door (and some posters of the Italian subjunctive and conditional on the bathroom mirror) his only reply was a very exasperated, "Can't you just stick to English??"

He was learing Italian and Indonesian when he first started high school, and despite getting quite high marks, he absolutely hated it with a passion. Now, aside from English, the only language he speaks is the Language of the Nintendo Wii and All Associated Video Game Things.

Sigh. We're chalk and cheese. :roll:
без тебя я не я. нас никогда не догонят! я тебя люблю.


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