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Geoff
Posts: 251
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 7:55 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Post by Geoff » Wed Aug 20, 2008 12:13 am

umberto wrote:Many Australian schools offer Italian because we have so many Italian migrants here.
I used to know that in Australia lots of Italian migrants live, but I thought they didn’t feel the need to regain their language. Do they expect any legitimization? I mean, is this something that involves politics or is it just folklore? Do you know any bibliographical or electronical references to get information about it? Thanks![/quote]

No Umberto, there are no politics involved and I am sorry that I can't supply any references.

I can say that a lot of people of Italian background attend the night school Italian classes I go to. I guess they want to connect to the culture of their parents. A couple of people said that they wanted to be able to communicate with their grandparents, who speak little or no English. This is not uncommon amongst older Italians. I had Italian neighbours a few years ago who had no English at all.

We also have an exclusively Italian radio station here in Melbourne and another that is 50% Italian. Furthermore, Italians frequently speak Italo-Australian, a hotch-potch of Italian and English, with other Italians who do not speak the same dialect. Therefore, I do not think it is entirely correct to say that they do not feel the need to retain their language.

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umberto
Posts: 443
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:39 pm
Location: Italy

Post by umberto » Thu Aug 21, 2008 10:55 am

No Umberto, there are no politics involved and I am sorry that I can't supply any references.

I can say that a lot of people of Italian background attend the night school Italian classes I go to. I guess they want to connect to the culture of their parents. A couple of people said that they wanted to be able to communicate with their grandparents, who speak little or no English. This is not uncommon amongst older Italians. I had Italian neighbours a few years ago who had no English at all.

We also have an exclusively Italian radio station here in Melbourne and another that is 50% Italian. Furthermore, Italians frequently speak Italo-Australian, a hotch-potch of Italian and English, with other Italians who do not speak the same dialect. Therefore, I do not think it is entirely correct to say that they do not feel the need to retain their language.
Migration must be a complex social phonomenon. In Italy we have some linguistic minorities (like in any other country, I suppose), but only two of these enjoy a governmental acknowledgement: the German-speaking in Alto Adige and the French-speaking in Val d’Aosta (the matter of Val d’Aosta is, actually, quite different from the matter of an ordinary linguistic minority…). So I thought that Italian migrants in Australia intended to proclaim themselves linguistic minority or something like this.

Geoff
Posts: 251
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 7:55 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Post by Geoff » Sat Aug 23, 2008 3:23 am

umberto wrote:
No Umberto, there are no politics involved and I am sorry that I can't supply any references.

I can say that a lot of people of Italian background attend the night school Italian classes I go to. I guess they want to connect to the culture of their parents. A couple of people said that they wanted to be able to communicate with their grandparents, who speak little or no English. This is not uncommon amongst older Italians. I had Italian neighbours a few years ago who had no English at all.

We also have an exclusively Italian radio station here in Melbourne and another that is 50% Italian. Furthermore, Italians frequently speak Italo-Australian, a hotch-potch of Italian and English, with other Italians who do not speak the same dialect. Therefore, I do not think it is entirely correct to say that they do not feel the need to retain their language.
Migration must be a complex social phonomenon. In Italy we have some linguistic minorities (like in any other country, I suppose), but only two of these enjoy a governmental acknowledgement: the German-speaking in Alto Adige and the French-speaking in Val d’Aosta (the matter of Val d’Aosta is, actually, quite different from the matter of an ordinary linguistic minority…). So I thought that Italian migrants in Australia intended to proclaim themselves linguistic minority or something like this.
No, nothing like that Umberto. Like any migrants they naturally like to speak their native language amongst themselves.

Philip
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 6:25 am
Location: Perth, West Australia

Post by Philip » Mon Aug 25, 2008 9:21 am

Geoff, I find that the children of migrants do not like to speak their parent's language, at least in Perth this is so. These kids quickly pick up mainstream Aussie lingo in order to survive the schoolyard. I have noticed this within many migrant groups.

However as time passes the situarion changes. For instance I have noticed that many of those taking Italian as adults have an Italian connection in their family.

This is a complex situation and it would be facile for me to make sweeping statements all based on my obsevations. But I do like a challenge!!!

Migrant families arrive, the kids don't learn their parent's language, those that do refuse to use it. All except fot those speaking Mandarin which is the ONLY foreign language that I have ever heared spoken in the schoolyard.

Time passes, the families move up the social ladder, untill only the oldies speak the original toungue, the grandchildren learn a few words so they can chat with Nanna.

A bit more time passes, the grandchildren, or their childerm re-discover their heritage and begin taking the language at adult education.

Phil.

Geoff
Posts: 251
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 7:55 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Post by Geoff » Tue Aug 26, 2008 1:55 am

Philip wrote:Geoff, I find that the children of migrants do not like to speak their parent's language, at least in Perth this is so. These kids quickly pick up mainstream Aussie lingo in order to survive the schoolyard. I have noticed this within many migrant groups.

However as time passes the situarion changes. For instance I have noticed that many of those taking Italian as adults have an Italian connection in their family.

This is a complex situation and it would be facile for me to make sweeping statements all based on my obsevations. But I do like a challenge!!!

Migrant families arrive, the kids don't learn their parent's language, those that do refuse to use it. All except fot those speaking Mandarin which is the ONLY foreign language that I have ever heared spoken in the schoolyard.

Time passes, the families move up the social ladder, untill only the oldies speak the original toungue, the grandchildren learn a few words so they can chat with Nanna.

A bit more time passes, the grandchildren, or their childerm re-discover their heritage and begin taking the language at adult education.

Phil.
I would pretty much agree with that although I suspect that children of migrants, whether born here or not, do use their parents' language at home if not outside the home.

Philip
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 6:25 am
Location: Perth, West Australia

Post by Philip » Tue Aug 26, 2008 10:30 am

Yes 'tis so. Today, one of my students, this is true, said that she was Italian.

I asked where her parents were from.

"Well, me Dad's from Sicily, and me Mum's from Scotland."

I asked if she spoke Italian.

"No,..... I don't speak Scottish either."

Phil.

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