Italian Resources

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Roby
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Italian Resources

Post by Roby » Fri Nov 26, 2004 2:44 pm

Here is a list of 25 Italian resources for the those interested in learning Italian. It was compiled by other members and myself of another group.

1. Penguin Concise Italian Dictionary (The big hardcover one)
2. Complete Handbook of Italian Verbs by Angelo Guarnuccio
3. Oxford Duden Pictorial Italian Dictonary
4. Schaum's Outline of Italian Grammar
5. Italian Verb Drills by Paola Nanni-Tate
6. L'Espresso magazine or La Repubblica newspaper (articles often have some of the latest idioms and expressions that might not be in dictionaries).
7. Music: Opera is difficult, especially if it's not sung by native singers. On the other hand I am pretty addicted to Zucchero and can actually follow what he's singing.
8. Interactive CDs: I just got "Learn Italian Now!" from Transparent Language. It's better than tapes, since I can type in any word and find out how it's pronounced, plus it has word games, language drills and little videos with people speaking in real time.
9. Online radio broadcasts or videos. Both run in real time and force you to concentrate without a dictionary.
10. This group. This is probably the best resource for learning Italian anywhere. Even if you never ever interact with the group, you could spend months just going through the files and bookmarks, they are an incredibly wonderful accumulation of information. But interacting with everyone here is also a wonderful thing. No lesson book on earth would give you so many views on how a sentence might be interpreted and translated. Let alone the information that our native Italian speakers can gives us. I don't think anyone would learn those in a regular classroom!
11. 501 Italian Verbs by Colaneri and Luciani - Absolutely indispensable.
12. A BIG dictionary. I like Harper Collins Sansoni Italian Unabridged If you can't find the unabridged HC, you probably could find it's smaller sister, Harper Collins College Dictionary, which seems more widely available. Not as comprehensive but it includes a really wonderful big section in the middle with phrases for writing all kinds of letters, resumes, formal invitations and responses and all types of written communication.
13. A LITTLE dictionary. Harper Collins again. Their "Pocket Italian Dictionary" has more words in a more useful format than its four predecessors. :-)
14. "2001 Italian and English Idioms" by Gobetti et al. This is the place to look up all those quirky sayings in either language. When someone tells you you are "proprio in gamba" you can figure out whether to be insulted or pleased. It is a lot of fun to just read this book. Our idioms are like a window into our cultures.
15. "English Grammar for Students of Italian" by Adorni and Primorac. Another essential resource. I think there are a lot of people on this list that swear by this little purple book. It's not a traditional Italian grammar book. It approaches grammar through English. For me, it's nearly impossible to learn when to use the subjunctive conditional in the dependent clause if I have no idea what those things are. Most of us aging Boomers had English grammar a long, long time ago. This is a great reminder.
16. "Italian Fundamentals - Basic Grammar & Vocabulary - Essential Verbs - Common Idioms" by Robert V. Piluso. This is a tri-fold, three 8-1/2 X 11 plasticized two-sided pages with holes punched for a binder. It summarizes just the key points of everything you want to know. You know those little index cards that some people make themselves that capture the key points? These three pages do that. The students that I study with say that if we just knew the material on these three pages, we'd know Italian ha ha ha.
17. "A Reference Grammar of Modern Italian" by Maiden and Robustelli. An advanced grammar that is over my head in many ways. But the extent of their explanations is so far superior to anything else that I have seen. Not just a summary with a few examples but pages and pages with very quirky examples. If you read the examples, you'd wonder what the heck these two authors do in their day jobs! The examples are full of weird references. Like, "She'd heard that I had been bringing in the cocaine" and "So who will they shoot? Me. Or maybe you." ha ha ha Or how about this one: "The illegal immigrants got throw into the sea without regard for children or pregnant women." Yikes!
18. "Using Italian Synonyms" by Moss and Motta. A big thick wonderful thesaurus organized in groups of related concepts and indexed by key words. An advanced reference. Features a rating system that tells you which of the alternatives is appropriate in formal settings or in casual or intimate settings. The authors say that more alternatives are displayed for concepts that have more words (makes sense) and that these are areas in which the Italian culture is particularly interested. So if there are twelve different ways of saying "thin", for example, the authors suggest that "thinness" is a value or a focus of attention in the Italian mind or culture. This is a unique book. I have never seen anything else like it in the stores.
19. Any CD by Andrea Bocelli! Pop or opera, Bocelli's diction is so wonderfully clear that you can understand every word. And each CD come with a booklet with all the lyrics. Or find the lyrics on this nice website: http://abmusica.home.mindspring.com/song_index.htm What a great way to practice while you are driving! :-)
20. Master The Basics Italian, 2nd Ed. Marcel Danesi, Ph.D.
21. Learning Italian CD/Cassette and Book programs a) Living Language Series b) Let's Go Series
22. A Good Phrasebook : Rick Steves Italian Phrasebook; Italian At A Glance by Barrons
23. A Good Textbook: Prego, 5th Ed. Barnes and Noble carries the textbook www.bn.com
24. Essentials Italian:Quick Access to Important Aspects of the Language and it's use, Reasearch and Education Association.
25. A good attitude and the desire to learn is the best advice I can give you. You will become frustrated and overwhelmed when learning a new language, but remember Rome was not built in a day! Learning a new language takes years. You have to start at the very beginning (the basics) and work your way through. In bocca al lupo! Good Luck! Roby

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charlene
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Post by charlene » Mon Nov 29, 2004 2:32 pm

Rob,
Grazie per questa lista preziosa delle risorse. Conosci un dizionario italiano sul internet? Usavo questo sito:

http://it.wordreference.com/it/translation.asp?enit=

ma recentement, l'hanno aggiornato ed ora non mi piace a fatto. Le definizioni sono molto semplici, e non ci sono più esempi di uso. Non riesco cercare un altro italiano dizionario on-line.:(
Charlene

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Mindy
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Post by Mindy » Mon Nov 29, 2004 5:04 pm

I took the liberty of providing links to places on the internet where you can purchase the wonderful resources Roby has recommended!

1. Concise Oxford-Paravia Italian Dictionary (I couldn't find the Penguin Concise Italian Dictionary for sale in the U.S.)

2. Complete Handbook of Italian Verbs by Angelo Guarnuccio.

3. Oxford Duden Pictorial Italian Dictonary

4. Schaum's Outline of Italian Grammar

5. Italian Verb Drills by Paola Nanni-Tate

6. L'Espresso magazine or La Repubblica newspaper (articles often have some of the latest idioms and expressions that might not be in dictionaries).

7. Music: Opera is difficult, especially if it's not sung by native singers. On the other hand I am pretty addicted to Zucchero and can actually follow what he's singing. Check out the main page of Impariamo.com for links to Zucchero, Eros, and Giorgia music CDs!

8. Interactive CDs: I just got "Learn Italian Now!" from Transparent Language. It's better than tapes, since I can type in any word and find out how it's pronounced, plus it has word games, language drills and little videos with people speaking in real time.

9. Online radio broadcasts. They run in real time and force you to concentrate without a dictionary.

10. This group! This is probably the best resource for learning Italian anywhere. Even if you never ever interact with the group, you could spend months just going through the files and bookmarks, they are an incredibly wonderful accumulation of information. But interacting with everyone here is also a wonderful thing. No lesson book on earth would give you so many views on how a sentence might be interpreted and translated. Let alone the information that our native Italian speakers can gives us. I don't think anyone would learn those in a regular classroom!

11. 501 Italian Verbs by Colaneri and Luciani - Absolutely indispensable.

12. A BIG dictionary. I like Harper Collins Sansoni Italian Unabridged.

13. A LITTLE dictionary. Harper Collins again. Their "Pocket Italian Dictionary" has more words in a more useful format than its four predecessors. :-)

14. "2001 Italian and English Idioms" by Gobetti et al. This is the place to look up all those quirky sayings in either language. When someone tells you you are "proprio in gamba" you can figure out whether to be insulted or pleased. It is a lot of fun to just read this book. Our idioms are like a window into our cultures.

15. "English Grammar for Students of Italian" by Adorni and Primorac. Another essential resource. I think there are a lot of people on this list that swear by this little purple book. It's not a traditional Italian grammar book. It approaches grammar through English. For me, it's nearly impossible to learn when to use the subjunctive conditional in the dependent clause if I have no idea what those things are. Most of us aging Boomers had English grammar a long, long time ago. This is a great reminder.

16. "Italian Fundamentals - Basic Grammar & Vocabulary - Essential Verbs - Common Idioms" by Robert V. Piluso. This is a tri-fold, three 8-1/2 X 11 plasticized two-sided pages with holes punched for a binder. It summarizes just the key points of everything you want to know. You know those little index cards that some people make themselves that capture the key points? These three pages do that. The students that I study with say that if we just knew the material on these three pages, we'd know Italian ha ha ha.

17. "A Reference Grammar of Modern Italian" by Maiden and Robustelli. An advanced grammar that is over my head in many ways. But the extent of their explanations is so far superior to anything else that I have seen. Not just a summary with a few examples but pages and pages with very quirky examples. If you read the examples, you'd wonder what the heck these two authors do in their day jobs! The examples are full of weird references. Like, "She'd heard that I had been bringing in the cocaine" and "So who will they shoot? Me. Or maybe you." ha ha ha Or how about this one: "The illegal immigrants got throw into the sea without regard for children or pregnant women." Yikes!

18. "Using Italian Synonyms" by Moss and Motta. A big thick wonderful thesaurus organized in groups of related concepts and indexed by key words. An advanced reference. Features a rating system that tells you which of the alternatives is appropriate in formal settings or in casual or intimate settings. The authors say that more alternatives are displayed for concepts that have more words (makes sense) and that these are areas in which the Italian culture is particularly interested. So if there are twelve different ways of saying "thin", for example, the authors suggest that "thinness" is a value or a focus of attention in the Italian mind or culture. This is a unique book. I have never seen anything else like it in the stores.

19. Any CD by Andrea Bocelli! Pop or opera, Bocelli's diction is so wonderfully clear that you can understand every word. And each CD come with a booklet with all the lyrics. Or find the lyrics on this nice website: http://abmusica.home.mindspring.com/song_index.htm What a great way to practice while you are driving! :-)

20. Master The Basics: Italian, 2nd Ed. Marcel Danesi, Ph.D.

21. Learning Italian CD/Cassette and Book programs: Living Language Series.

22. A Good Phrasebook: Rick Steves Italian Phrasebook; orItalian At A Glance by Barrons

23. A Good Textbook: Prego, 5th Ed.

24. Essentials Italian: Quick Access to Important Aspects of the Language and it's use, Reasearch and Education Association. (Sorry, I couldn’t find this one!)

25. A good attitude and the desire to learn is the best advice I can give you. You will become frustrated and overwhelmed when learning a new language, but remember Rome was not built in a day! Learning a new language takes years. You have to start at the very beginning (the basics) and work your way through. In bocca al lupo! Good Luck! Roby

Annamaria
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Post by Annamaria » Mon Nov 29, 2004 5:07 pm

io uso due dizionari nel internet:

http://www.garzantilinguistica.it questo e' un buon dizionario ma dovete sapere la forma lessica della parola.

L'altro e' wordreference.com . Non vedo il tempo quando finiscono a rifare il sito.

Mi piace anche http://parole.virgilio.it/parole/verbi_ ... /index.asp. Non e' semplicemente un dizionario inglese-italiano ma un sito italiano dove posso trovare la cognugazione dei verbi, la definizione di una parola e anche dov'e' l'accento.

Annamaria

Annamaria
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Post by Annamaria » Mon Nov 29, 2004 5:34 pm

if you are a total beginner, or just need a structured way of reviewing grammar, http://cyberitalian.com is a good place. you pay $25 for a yearly membership(waived for now) and $30 for each level, you want to study - 30 lessons in total- with exercises and much italian history and culture. They have a forum but it's rarely used. They also have a free trial for every level. The lessons are audio-visual, so you get to hear what you read.

Annamaria

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Angel
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Post by Angel » Mon Nov 29, 2004 5:51 pm

Ciao,

Non ho visto questo link qui:

http://www.demauroparavia.it

e' un dizionario Italiano-Italiano.


Inoltre, sto usando questo sito per ricerca in italiano:

http://www.italyseek.it/

Ciao,

Angel

Roby
Posts: 3850
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:06 pm

Post by Roby » Mon Nov 29, 2004 6:10 pm

charlene wrote:Rob,
Grazie per questa lista preziosa delle risorse. Conosci un dizionario italiano sul internet? Usavo questo sito:

http://it.wordreference.com/it/translation.asp?enit=

ma recentement, l'hanno aggiornato ed ora non mi piace a fatto. Le definizioni sono molto semplici, e non ci sono più esempi di uso. Non riesco cercare un altro italiano dizionario on-line.:(
Charlene,
A friend sent these to me Try these.
http://www.demauroparavia.it

http://www.crs4.it

http://www.crs4.it/HTML/Literature.html

there choice bits of Italian literature here in big chunks and
fragments....plus lots of other interesting tid-bits...

By the way, I enjoyed reading your story with the first vocabulary list. I look forward to reading your next story with the new vocabulary list.
If you have any other questions, feel free to post them and they will be answered by someone.

Roby

caterina
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2004 11:43 pm
Location: DFW - Texas

La musica italiana

Post by caterina » Tue Nov 30, 2004 1:27 pm

7. Music: Opera is difficult, especially if it's not sung by native singers. On the other hand I am pretty addicted to Zucchero and can actually follow what he's singing. Check out the main page of Impariamo.com for links to Zucchero, Eros, and Giorgia music CDs!
Oltre a quelle artiste c'è Ligabue, se vi piace la voce di Bruce Springsteen, poi forse vi piacerebbe. Mi piace molto la musica di Ligabue, le canzoni hanno significato e sono facile capire.

Per quelle di voi che non piace la musica pop, ci sono le artiste più vecchio, Vasco Rossi, I Pooh, Lucio Battisti, Umberto Tozzi, Franco Battiato (qualche canzoni canta nel dialetto, ma loro sono pochi), Fabrizio De Andrè (è canzoni dicano le storie reale e finte (anche qualche canzoni nel dialetto))

Qualche altre artiste sono: Gianluca Grignani, Massimo DiCataldo, Marco Masini, Mario Venuti, 883.

I Dik Dik: hanno canzoni americana che sono in italiano, essere conscio(be aware?) delle parole, non ci sono la stessa. (California Dreaming, Whiter shade of pale, Happy Together, Knights in White Satin, ecc.. la musica dal '60/'70)

la muscia traditionale: Renzo Arbore (Napolitano, molto difficile capire, (se siete a NJ, qualche volte Renzo Arbore suona ad Atlantic City.))

Se siete a NY, in Brooklyn a 18th ave c'è un shoppe italiana, loro sono musica italiana e tante altre cose, si chiama S.A.S. Italian Records su 18th Ave (è locale dove hanno la festa di Santa Rosalia) oppure http://www.sasitalian.com/

a presto,
-cate

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Mindy
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Post by Mindy » Tue Nov 30, 2004 8:57 pm

Ciao Cate! Come va?

Grazie per i suggerimenti per la musica italiana!

Non ho mai sentito del negozio S.A.S. Italian Records, ma la prossima volta andiamo a NY lo cerco di sicuro.

--Mindy

caterina
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2004 11:43 pm
Location: DFW - Texas

Post by caterina » Wed Dec 01, 2004 12:00 am

Ciao Mindy e prego! :)

Tutt'è bene, ho stata molto impegnato con la festa e Natale è in arrivo!

E tu, come va? Vedo che hai stata impegnato qua nel forum!

Ho un'amore per la musica (ascoltare e suonare). Mi piace quasi ogni genere di musica eccetto rap (mi dispiace, ma avevo dirlo!).
Questa settimana la mia canzone favorito è Almeno Credo di Ligabue.

S.A.S ha stato lì per tanti anni, almeno purchè posso ricordare. Il negozio non è molto grande, però ha tutto italiano! È l'unico negozio dove posso trovare le mie carte da gioco (almeno negli Stati Uniti). Non avevo conosciuto che hanno un sito sul web fino ad oggi! :oops:
(accanto a S.A.S, c'è una gelateria :D :D)

a presto,
-cate

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charlene
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Post by charlene » Wed Dec 01, 2004 7:56 pm

Ciao a tutti,
Grazie per aiutarmi cercare un dizionario on-line. Annamaria, Garzanti Linguistic è essatament quello che voglio. Roby, Mi piace anche il sito di De Mauro -- è una sfida per leggere le definizioni in italiano! Grazie ancora.
Charlene

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Twilight
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Post by Twilight » Sun Jan 23, 2005 12:23 pm

Questo link potrebbe essere utile:

http://parole.virgilio.it/parole/

ciao!
Claudietto

I am learning English every day, so could you help me by correcting (In private, if you want) anything I have written incorrectly.

ILNY - I Love "Not yet"
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teebay
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Audio-files with transcripts

Post by teebay » Thu Feb 17, 2005 6:33 pm

Dear all
If you are interested in audio-files with transcrips, please check the audio webpage of The Italian College out. You can reach it clicking on "audio" in the homepage (www.theitaliancollege.com).
Hope this information can be of help.

tiberio
________________________________________________
The Italian College
www.theitaliancollege.com

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Elena
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Location: Chicago

Post by Elena » Mon Apr 25, 2005 1:32 am

Ciao tutti,
Ho visto il programma si chiama "Rosetta Stone" sul forum. Penso che sia molto caro. Qualcuno avete comprato questo programma o l'avete usato?
Ho chiesto questa domanda sul forum molto mesi fa ma nessuno hanno risposto. Sono curiosa. :|
Elena

Luca

Post by Luca » Tue Apr 26, 2005 12:00 pm

charlene wrote:Rob,
Grazie per questa lista preziosa delle risorse. Conosci un dizionario italiano sul internet?
Questi sono molto interessanti

http://www.sapere.it/gr/DictionarySearc ... ction=Init
http://www.logos.it/lang/transl_it.html

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