Italian Resources

Have a question about Italian grammar? Need a quick translation from Italian to English or vice versa? Post it here!
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Mindy
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Post by Mindy » Wed Apr 27, 2005 3:03 pm

Elena wrote:Ciao tutti,
Ho visto il programma si chiama "Rosetta Stone" sul forum. Penso che sia molto caro. Qualcuno avete comprato questo programma o l'avete usato?
Ho chiesto questa domanda sul forum molto mesi fa ma nessuno hanno risposto. Sono curiosa. :|
Elena
Elena,

non ho mai usato il programma Rosetta Stone, ma puoi leggere commenti di altri che l'hanno usato su Amazon:

Rosetta Stone Italian Personal Edition Level 1

Rosetta Stone Italian Level 1 & 2 Personal Edition

Questi "reviews" sono molto completi, onesti, e spero che ti aiuteranno decidere se comprare o no....ma penso che se non ti piaccia, puoi sempre avere i soldi indietro!

Facci sapere se decidi di comprarlo!

--Mindy

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Post by Guest » Sat Apr 30, 2005 2:45 pm

Ciao Elena,
Non ho il programma di Rosetta Stone, ma ho datto una scorsa il manual di questo programma dal casa di un amico. Il programma è molto divertente perchè è interattivo, ma sembra che sia troppo facile per te. (Sai molto italiano e scrivi italiano molto bene.) C'e un modo che puoi dare un'occhiata a un manual?

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charlene
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Post by charlene » Sat Apr 30, 2005 2:55 pm

Anonymous wrote:Ciao Elena,
Non ho il programma di Rosetta Stone, ma ho datto una scorsa il manual di questo programma dal casa di un amico. Il programma è molto divertente perchè è interattivo, ma sembra che sia troppo facile per te. (Sai molto italiano e scrivi italiano molto bene.) C'e un modo che puoi dare un'occhiata a un manual?
Questo messaggio è da me. Non so perchè il computer pensa che sia io un ospite oggi :roll:
Charlene

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Elena
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Post by Elena » Mon May 02, 2005 2:33 am

Ciao Charlene,
Grazie per il tuo complimento :!: Qualche volta penso che impari più se ho molti libri e CDs aiutarmi con la lingua. Sempre sto cercando più libri italiani.
Grazie per il tuo consiglio.
Elena

Roby
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Post by Roby » Tue Sep 05, 2006 12:32 am

From Moodywop, Carlo:

CARLO'S LIST OF ITALIAN AND ENGLISH RESOURCES FOR LEARNING.

An Australian friend gave me permission to post here his list of the books he recommends, with his interesting comments:

"It occurred to me after reading your post that you may be interested - in my experience these are the two best English grammar texts out there at the moment -

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language


I can understand what you mean about the Maiden/Robustelli text. I suppose it is bit academic/pesante and could be a bit daunting or tedious for some. But it is the most comprehensive.

The short answer is....there isn't one. It would depend on the individual, what background/education they had, etcetera. That said:

Of all texts I'm familiar with, this would probably be most likely to assist native English students. Plus it is portable - slim volume.

English Grammar for Students of Italian

The text explains and juxtaposes English grammatical concepts with Italian grammar. Excellent.

This is the best of those with a focus is on simplicity and (pocket sized almost) portability -

Oxford Italian Grammar & Verbs

This is widely used and highly regarded - more complex classroom type text, still very portable -

Da Capo

This one is a more substantial, non 'classroom-type' text but not as 'pesante' as Maiden/Robustelli -

Modern Italian Grammar

If you read the reviews there, you'll see a comment I agree with. The accessibility of the text in terms of indexing, conceptual layout etc leaves a lot to be desired - è un pecccato.

Notwithstanding your disagreement (and others on the Forum) regarding one of the anche examples, and I'm not sure what to make of that at this point, this text really is brilliant generally -

Using Italian - A Guide to Contemporary Usage

The emphasis here is on areas which are most likely to be problematic for English speakers. At the same time, it indicates 'registers' throughout - informal, neutral, formal and so on. Also regional. It's a serious text.

The text may be in error to some degree or other there, I don't know. I may even email Professor Kinder about it, if and when I have time.
This is considered a must-have for serious students -

Using Italian Synonyms

Anything from Cambridge on language is likely to be very good. Although another of their texts - Using Italian Vocabulary - isn't all it could have been.

I know you didn't ask, but this is a very good vocabulary text -

Mastering Italian Vocabulary

DICTIONARIES
The recently issued new edition of the Oxford/Paravia dictionary (2006)(advertised underneath ) corrected the mistakes regarding "addirittura" and "qualsiasi". I've only browsed through it at Feltrinelli but it looks impressive. I recommend this dictionary. The Harper Collins is also very good but I'm told a new edition is about to be released.

As for monolingual dictionaries my recommendations are the "Sabatini/Coletti" dictionary (despite its misleading entry for "addirittura" it has excellent usage notes) and especially the new edition of "Devoto/Oli" - the best on the market, no doubt about it.

As for online momolingual dictionaries De Mauro/Paravia (http://www.demauroparavia.it/) is excellent and up-to-date. Garzanti (http://www.garzantilinguistica.it/interna_ita.html) is not as good but has etymologies (not provided in De Mauro).

As for online bilingual dictionaries I can only recommend the Garzanti/Hazon (same link as above - btw you need to register but it's free).

Roby
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Post by Roby » Fri Mar 23, 2007 4:57 pm


Roby
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Post by Roby » Mon Jun 25, 2007 4:19 pm

BUYING BOOKS ONLINE.

These are all the websites where you can buy online....

IBS: http://www.internetbookshop.it

BOL:
http://www.bol.it/

or this one....but I've never used it....or, to be more precise, I know that the two I've written before are used from the bookshops too here in Italy...and, I don't know anything about it.....however....this is its address

WEBSTER:
http://www.webster.it/libri-nuovo_dizion...

Roby

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keithatengagedthinking
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Post by keithatengagedthinking » Mon Jun 25, 2007 4:36 pm

You might want to consider some Italian grammar guides that are written in Italian for intermediate/advanced students learning Italian as a foreign language. There are some nice ones out there that give pretty good explanations? :)

Carlo
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Location: Salerno, Italy

Post by Carlo » Mon Jun 25, 2007 7:12 pm

keithatengagedthinking wrote:You might want to consider some Italian grammar guides that are written in Italian for intermediate/advanced students learning Italian as a foreign language. There are some nice ones out there that give pretty good explanations? :)
Hi Keith

The ones I've seen were not very good. Of course there may be new ones that are better.
Generally I find that grammar guides written by English speakers (with the help of a native speaker, like Maiden/Robustelli and Proudfoot/Cardo) give much better explanations and cover in much greater detail the areas that are most likely to cause problems for English-speaking learners.

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keithatengagedthinking
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Post by keithatengagedthinking » Mon Jun 25, 2007 7:47 pm

There are some newer ones that are better, at least in my opinion:

Federico Roncoroni wrote an excellent one called 'Grammatica essenziale della lingua italiana' (2005, Mondadori) that I read and found very helpful in explaining some nuances that sometimes get lost in the translation.

Everyone has different learning styles, but sometimes teaching grammar can 'box in' learners who try to make too many (or sometimes too little) comparisons to their native language. Books like these probably do not help beginners, but intermediate and advanced students would probably benefit more.

I have also heard good things about Susanna Nocchi's 'Grammatica avanzata della lingua italiana' (2006).

Roby
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Post by Roby » Sat Jun 30, 2007 2:51 pm

The four skills to learning a new language

Listening: Are you a music lover? If so, why not listen to
recordings you enjoy. It's a fabulous way to learn. There's
something about songs and memory isn't there?

Speaking: We are all different but many adult learners feel too
embarrassed to speak aloud in class. If you're unable or unwilling,
try mouthing the words or expressions.

Reading: For many people, reading is learning. For most people
learning is reading but in language learning, reading has to be
balanced with the other three language skills. Why not read aloud? A
great way to learn is listening to the language and reading at the
same time.

Writing: This is the fourth and last of the skills. A way of
learning a word or expression, of making it your own. It can remain
foreign to us until we write it in our notebooks.

A commitment toward learning a language will mean that you will make
the time to study which for many people involves sitting at a table
and covering the four skills in a systematic way.

Roby
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

Roby
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Post by Roby » Tue Dec 18, 2007 1:27 pm

Question about some direction help in learning Italian

http://impariamo.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=21714#21714
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

Larry Gomes
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Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 8:38 pm

L'eredita

Post by Larry Gomes » Fri Oct 08, 2010 11:11 pm

Ciao a tutti
Before you read the rest of this post, I must warn you that I do not actually practice what I preach, ie although I am recommending a TV show as a good resource for learning Italian, I do not actually watch it. This is mainly because I do not have a good enough internet connection to handle video. If anyone feels that such a post is inappropriate then I would encourage you to report it and I will gladly have it removed.
When I went to Italy recently I watched a quiz show called L'eredita on RAI uno and found that to be useful (as someone who has only been learning Italian for 12 months).
It is quite similar to Millionaire and the slow pace of these quiz shows means that the questions are asked in a slow, clear manner. Furthermore, the questions appear onscreen. Although those who are very good at Italian may consider this to be cheating, I find that it gives my some respite from the constant stream of words which I cannot understand. For those who would find this too simple, the mini-interviews with the contestants are a good opportunity to listen in on Italian conversations, the contestants tend not to get too animated and start talking too quickly. As an aside, I think that because the contestants are standing up, they tend to be more expressive than if they were sitting down as in Millionaire. I am sure that I am not alone in loving the gestures as much as the sounds of the Italian language. It is also great to hear the "essato"s, "si, si"s and "va bene"s which appear in Italian conversation, but which one could never learn from a book.
I did not watch Chi vuol essere milionario? (it is on Canale 5 at the same time), but seeing short clips on YouTube, I imagine that it would be equally useful, although I must admit a personal preference for L'eredita.
Best place to find out about these shows and try to watch them online are their respective websites:

L'eredita
http://www.raiuno.rai.it/dl/RaiUno/prog ... 48a17543a4

The rules of l'eredita in English
http://www.slowtrav.com/italy/general/sc_eredita.htm

Millionaire
http://www.tv.mediaset.it/canale5/il_milionario/


I would also be extremely grateful to hear what other people think of these quiz shows and how useful they are to learning Italian
Grazie
Larry

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cyn
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Location: Palermo - Italy

Link utile per coniugare i verbi... e altre risorse

Post by cyn » Thu Nov 25, 2010 9:13 pm

Penso che questo sito possa essere di aiuto per la coniugazione dei verbi:

http://coniuga.com/


Aggiungo questi link a risorse utili per chi sta imparando la lingua italiana:

http://it.thefreedictionary.com/
This is a free online dictionary. You can find words, their definition and their use in idioms. Moreover, you can listen to the pronunciation of each word by clicking on the speaker icon.

http://www.initalia.rai.it/docufiction.asp?contId=2
This is just an example to show you how you can listen to a story while you read it (the dialogue text is on the right).
You can choose any of the episodes listed there. I think that would be useful for learning everyday language.
My advice: try to skip the title sequence, because it's just a bit too long :roll:

Rafao
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Location: Polonia

Post by Rafao » Fri Jul 22, 2011 12:38 pm

Ciao a tutti !

Qualcuno sa dirmi se c'e' un buon libro di testo o un dizionario che si trattano delle collocazioni in vocabolario nella lingua italiana?

Grazie in anticipo :)
Raf

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