Questions about the word He/him

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keeg92
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Questions about the word He/him

Post by keeg92 » Sat Jan 29, 2011 2:25 am

I am a little confused about the differences between lui, si, gli. Could someone explain when I need to use each one?

Roby
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Re: Questions about the word He/him

Post by Roby » Sat Jan 29, 2011 2:42 am

keeg92 wrote:I am a little confused about the differences between lui, si, gli. Could someone explain when I need to use each one?

This link will be helpful LUI e GLI
http://www.impariamo.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=160

This link has a lot information....
http://www.impariamo.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=136

This link will be helpful SI
http://www.impariamo.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2508

I hope that this is helpful
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

maelström

Re: Questions about the word He/him

Post by maelström » Sat Jan 29, 2011 2:09 pm

keeg92 wrote:I am a little confused about the differences between lui, si, gli. Could someone explain when I need to use each one?
Please, provide us with some Italian sentences that are actually puzzling you... it is rather hard to explain such a general topic starting from such a generic question.

keeg92
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Post by keeg92 » Sat Jan 29, 2011 4:47 pm

sorry about that,

I said
"Lui chiama e Ryan", but i was told it should be "si chiama e Ryan"

"A lui piace giocare a calcio" or "Gli piace giocare a calcio"

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-Luca-
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Post by -Luca- » Sat Jan 29, 2011 5:04 pm

keeg92 wrote: "Lui chiama e Ryan", but i was told it should be "si chiama e Ryan"
"Lui si chiama Ryan", or simply "Si chiama Ryan"
keeg92 wrote:
"A lui piace giocare a calcio" or "Gli piace giocare a calcio"
Both are correct.
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

maelström

Post by maelström » Sat Jan 29, 2011 9:08 pm

keeg92 wrote: "Lui chiama e Ryan"
"Si chiama e Ryan"
Both incorrect. I guess the right sentence is "Lui si chiama Ryan" (His name is Ryan). It is equivalent to "Si chiama Ryan". Subject is often omitted in Italian. Note that "Lui chiama Ryan" means "He calls Ryan".
keeg92 wrote:"A lui piace giocare a calcio" or "Gli piace giocare a calcio"
They are interchangeable: "Gli" means just "a lui".

Geoff
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Re: Questions about the word He/him

Post by Geoff » Sat Jan 29, 2011 9:52 pm

keeg92 wrote:I am a little confused about the differences between lui, si, gli. Could someone explain when I need to use each one?
As Maelstrom said, it really is a broad topic and is too difficult to explain comprehensively here. However, in brief:

lui = he
si = himself/herself/themselves in reflexive verbs such as chiamarsi (there are other, non-reflexive uses too that I will not confuse you with here)
gli = to him (also "to them" in modern spoken Italian but loro is more correct)

Lui is a subject pronoun and these are normally omitted in Italian. You would use it for emphasis - to stress that he did it.

You use si with reflexive verbs, where the action reflects back onto the subject - Si chiama Ryan = He calls himself Ryan (ie His name is Ryan).

Gli is used to replace an indirect object of a verb - Da' da mangiare a Ryan (Give [to] Ryan something to eat) or Gli da' da mangiare (Give [to] him something to eat).

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-Luca-
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Re: Questions about the word He/him

Post by -Luca- » Sat Jan 29, 2011 10:12 pm

Geoff wrote:

Gli is used to replace an indirect object of a verb - Da' da mangiare a Ryan (Give [to] Ryan something to eat) or Gli da' da mangiare (Give [to] him something to eat).
Good Geoff :)

just a small correction :

Give [to] Ryan something to eat ! Da' (qualcosa) da mangiare a Ryan !

Gli dà da mangiare : He gives him something to eat.
Last edited by -Luca- on Sat Jan 29, 2011 10:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

maelström

Re: Questions about the word He/him

Post by maelström » Sat Jan 29, 2011 10:21 pm

Luca84 wrote:Dà (qualcosa) da mangiare a Ryan!
No, be careful with accents and apostrophes:

"Da' (qualcosa) da mangiare a Ryan!" (Give Ryan something to eat!)
"Dà (qualcosa) da mangiare a Ryan." (He gives Ryan something to eat.)

is the third person of the verb "dare".
Da' is second person imperative (truncation of "dai").

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-Luca-
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Post by -Luca- » Sat Jan 29, 2011 10:23 pm

Hai ragione, correggo subito il mio post :)
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!


Geoff
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Re: Questions about the word He/him

Post by Geoff » Sat Feb 10, 2018 4:55 am

Interesting but as I recall, I was trying to contrast modern spoken Italian with modern formal, elevated register Italian. I am not familiar with medieval Tuscan or anything much Italian language-wise between then and the last few decades.

Dylan Thomas
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Re: Questions about the word He/him

Post by Dylan Thomas » Sat Feb 10, 2018 8:36 pm

I would never say "gli domandò", always "domandò loro". I think the same is true for modern formal Italian. Geoff is correct though. "Gli domandò" can be used in informal language.


Ho incontrato Marco e Maria e gli ho detto di venire a trovarci qualche volta.
I met Marco and Maria and told them to come and see us some time.

DT

Tom S. Fox
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Re: Questions about the word He/him

Post by Tom S. Fox » Sun Feb 18, 2018 8:08 pm

Geoff wrote:
Sat Feb 10, 2018 4:55 am
Interesting but as I recall, I was trying to contrast modern spoken Italian with modern formal, elevated register Italian. I am not familiar with medieval Tuscan or anything much Italian language-wise between then and the last few decades.
Your claim remains incorrect. Here are some usage examples from the last few decades:
… ti mando queste bozze, perché tu gli dia un’occhiatina.

…I’m sending you these drafts so that you will take a look at them.
—Pietro Pancrazi, Letter to Manara Valgimigli, 1936
—Cesare Pavese, The Moon and the Bonfires, 1949
—Sandro Veronesi, Quiet Chaos, 2005
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Sat Feb 10, 2018 8:36 pm
I would never say "gli domandò", always "domandò loro".
Even when you are talking about only one person? Anyway, slavishly following this completely made-up rule makes your Italian sound stilted.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Sat Feb 10, 2018 8:36 pm
Geoff is correct though. "Gli domandò" can be used in informal language.
And formal language as well.

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