L09: ADVERBS OF MANNER – THE COMPARATIVE

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Peter
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L09: ADVERBS OF MANNER – THE COMPARATIVE

Postby Peter » Tue May 21, 2013 5:11 pm

L09: ADVERBS OF MANNER – THE COMPARATIVE
(Avverbi di maniera - Il comparativo)



Like adjectives, adverbs of manner (and some of time and of place) can take comparative and superlative forms. We use these forms in order to make comparisons. In this Lesson we look at the comparative form; in the next two Lessons we look at the two forms of the superlative.

Comparative

The comparative is rendered in English by adding –er to the adverb, or by using the word more before the adverb, for example:

far > further
slowly > more slowly
clearly > more clearly
often > more often
soon > sooner

In Italian the comparative is formed by the use of the word più before the adverb:

lontano > più lontano
lentamente > più lentamente
spesso > più spesso
presto > più presto
(or prima)

Examples:

Sei andato lontano, ma io sono andato ancora più lontano
You went far (a long way), but I went even further

Riccardo guida lentamente ma Adriano guida ancora più lentamente
Riccardo drives slowly but Adriano drives even more slowly

In the above Italian sentences the use of ancora allows more emphasis on the comparative adverbs. The same applies in the English versions, where even conveys an emphasis. If you did not use ancora or even, it would be better to write the sentences as follows:

Sei andato lontano, ma io sono andato più lontano di te
You went far (a long way), but I went even further than you

Riccardo guida lentamente ma Adriano guida più lentamente di lui
Riccardo drives slowly but Adriano drives more slowly than he

Note that it must be he in the above example, not him, since the sentence is assumed to end ‘than he does’.

Ci vedo molto meglio ora che non piove più
I can see more clearly now that the rain has gone

Facevamo spesso le vacanze al mare. Però, negli ultimi anni le abbiamo fatte più spesso in campagna
We often used to take our holidays by the seaside. However, in recent years we have taken them more often in the countryside

Sono arrivati prima di quanto mi aspettassi
They arrived sooner than I expected

It is also possible to use the adverb less, sometimes with a preposition plus an adjective, to form a comparative. In Italian you simply use meno instead of più, as follows:

often > less often
usual > less than usual
spesso > meno spesso
solito > meno del solito


Ora al mare ci andiamo meno spesso
We go to the seaside less often now

Ora ti vedo meno del solito? Perché?
I see you less often now. Why?

You can also use meno bene to mean less well in the sense of not doing something as well as before, for example:

Suono la tromba meno bene di prima
I do not play the trumpet as well as before
Last edited by calum on Wed Nov 23, 2016 1:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
A presto


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