At school

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ciccio
Posts: 73
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 3:39 pm

At school

Post by ciccio » Tue Sep 23, 2008 9:28 am

Hello everybody

1.
- Scusi professore, non ho capito. Può ripetere?
- Sorry ______, I didn't understand. Could you repeat?
Do you use 'professor' here? (high school or university)

2.
- Quando ero al liceo, ...
- When I was at high school, ...
Is 'high school' correct in both American and British English?

3.
How do you say 'registro' (the book where the professor writes the result of the exam)? register?

4.
Which is more natural?
- the results of the exam
- the exam results

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Davide
Posts: 627
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 8:38 pm
Location: UK

Re: At school

Post by Davide » Tue Sep 23, 2008 12:11 pm

ciccio wrote:Hello everybody

1.
- Scusi professore, non ho capito. Può ripetere?
- Sorry ______, I didn't understand. Could you repeat?
Do you use 'professor' here? (high school or university)

2.
- Quando ero al liceo, ...
- When I was at high school, ...
Is 'high school' correct in both American and British English?

3.
How do you say 'registro' (the book where the professor writes the result of the exam)? register?

4.
Which is more natural?
- the results of the exam
- the exam results

1) In a school in England we wouldn't use professor, a pupil would normally address a teacher as either 'sir' or miss' At University a student would be more likely to use the professor's actual name (things aren't quite as formal in the UK)

2) England doesn't have 'high schools' as such - they're normally called 'secondary schools' (for pupils aged 11 to 18)

3) the 'registro' is probably what we would call a mark book (the register is where pupils' daily attendance is recorded.

4) 'the exam results' is the more natural expression.

Hope this helps.

Andrew
Posts: 33
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2008 1:04 pm
Location: Bomaderry, NSW, Australia

Post by Andrew » Tue Sep 23, 2008 12:49 pm

In Australian English:

1. We would either address our teachers as 'sir' or 'miss' (this is fairly formal) or use their title in front of their surname (eg. Mr or Dr for men, and Dr, Mrs, Miss or Ms for women). Keep in mind that 'Doctor' in English is reserved for those with a PhD (the highest level of postgraduate study). I address my university tutors by their first names.


2. We would say 'high school', although if you've finished your secondary schooling and you say 'school' it's inferred that you're talking about high school.

3. I'm not sure that we have a word for that. Our marks are usually entered electronically into the school/uni system, and our exams/assignments are handed back to us with corrections and the final mark written in.

4. 'Exam results' is more natural, but I often say 'I got my results back for my (Italian, philosophy, history etc) exam'.

farfa11a
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu May 07, 2009 9:26 am
Location: Philadelphia/Gorizia

Post by farfa11a » Thu May 14, 2009 10:56 am

Ecco in American English:

1) We use Mr. (for a man) Mrs. (for a married woman) Miss. (for an unmarried woman) or Ms. (ambiguous, for a woman who doesn't want to declare her martial status) plus the teacher's last name (such as Mr. Segal or Mrs. Hobbes, who may decide to use Ms. Hobbes after a divore) In university (also known as college da noi) a teacher is adressed "professor"

2) high school is correct in American english

3) what Andrew said, but the teachers do keep their own personal records and it may be called a "grade log"

4) It doesn't really matter, we would probably just say "grade" instead

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