You and I vs You and me

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Roby
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You and I vs You and me

Postby Roby » Sat Nov 15, 2008 1:19 pm

Often many people are confused when trying to determine which is correct.. "You and I" or "You and me". Native English speakers included.

When to say "you and I" and when to say "you and me". Consider the following sentence: You and I should have lunch.

Is the correct form of this sentence "You and I ..." or "You and me ..."? This is a common source of confusion in English.

Fortunately, there's an easy way to decide whether to use "I" or "me" in such sentences. All you have to do is discard the word "you" then try the sentence with "I" and "me" one at a time. For example:

I should have lunch.
Me should have lunch.

Clearly the preferred form in this case is "I"; thus, the original sentence was correct as written. Here's another example: He'll blame you and I.

Discard the word "you" then try the sentence with "I" and "me" one at a time: so:

He'll blame I.

He'll blame me.

You can see that the second of these is correct. This means that the original sentence should have been: He'll blame you and me.

See how easy that was!

On a related note, when using phrases such as "you and me", "you and I" or "them and us", it is courteous to place the reference to yourself last. For example, we prefer:

He'll ask you and me later.


Which is correct "You vs. I" or "You and Me"?

I
"I" is used as the sentence's subject.
"I" must be used with a verb.
"I" is the subject of the verb.

Me
"Me" is used as the object of the sentence.
"Me" is usually not followed by a verb
"Me" is the object of the sentence.

You and I are always together on the weekends.
The award was given to you and me

I hope that this is helpful.
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

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giuseppe
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Postby giuseppe » Sat Nov 15, 2008 5:59 pm

thanks for sharing these interesting examples, Roby
My candle burns at both ends
It will not last the night
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends
It gives a lovely light.

jade
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Postby jade » Mon Nov 17, 2008 6:53 pm

Thank you, Roby, for bringing this up. Indeed I have heard several times even native English speakers misusing “I”and “me”. It is not uncommon to hear a native speaker to start a sentence with “My sister and me…..”

I would like to add one more: when after “to be”, “I” should be used:
e.g. 1. It is I.
2. Who told you about it? It was I.

It took me a long time to finally answer a telephone call correctly: “This is she”.

Another unrelated usage that had troubled me for a long time was:
“It is I who ___ leaving.”
Would anyone like to guess which one should be in the blank, am or is?

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Peter
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Postby Peter » Mon Nov 17, 2008 7:45 pm

Without a doubt it should read 'It is I who IS leaving'. AM would be completely wrong here; you simply cannot say 'It is I who AM leaving'! The structure of the sentence is that the wording 'It is I who' is actually a subject phrase, so requiring the 3rd person singular verb. :) :)
A presto


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giuseppe
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Postby giuseppe » Tue Nov 18, 2008 9:01 am

jade wrote:It took me a long time to finally answer a telephone call correctly: “This is she”.

very strange :shock:
My candle burns at both ends
It will not last the night
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends
It gives a lovely light.

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Peter
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Postby Peter » Tue Nov 18, 2008 12:32 pm

giuseppe wrote:
jade wrote:It took me a long time to finally answer a telephone call correctly: “This is she”.

very strange :shock:


Yes, Giuseppe, it does seem strange, clumsy, even incorrect. But it is absolutely correct grammatically. :) :) The question is: how many peopple actually respond in that way? Precious few, I would think. :)
A presto


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jade
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Postby jade » Tue Nov 18, 2008 6:49 pm

Peter wrote:Without a doubt it should read 'It is I who IS leaving'. AM would be completely wrong here; you simply cannot say 'It is I who AM leaving'! The structure of the sentence is that the wording 'It is I who' is actually a subject phrase, so requiring the 3rd person singular verb. :) :)

Oh Peter, you cannot do this to me! I became clear only two weeks ago, now you made me confused again!

Okay, what had convinced me was this:

"Samuel Johnson, the famous lexicographer, was once caught by his wife while cuddling the maid.

She exclaimed: "Samuel, I am surprised!"

"No, my dear," he responded, "it is I who am surprised. As for you, you are astonished.""

Now I give up, you two, who is correct? :)

jade
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Postby jade » Tue Nov 18, 2008 6:55 pm

giuseppe wrote:
jade wrote:It took me a long time to finally answer a telephone call correctly: “This is she”.

very strange :shock:


In the daily conversations, you can hear people saying “it’s me” or “it’s her” a lot. But once on the phone, if I am asked “may I speak to Jade?”, I have to answer “this is she”. From my observation, the native speakers hardly make any mistake on this one. :)

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Peter
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Postby Peter » Tue Nov 18, 2008 7:21 pm

Good grief :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops:

What the flippin' heck was I chuntering on about? :oops: :oops: :oops:


Well, we're all human, is my excuse!! :oops: :oops:
A presto


Peter

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jade
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Postby jade » Wed Nov 19, 2008 6:08 pm

Peter wrote:Good grief :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops:

What the flippin' heck was I chuntering on about? :oops: :oops: :oops:


Well, we're all human, is my excuse!! :oops: :oops:


Peter, sorry for giving you a hard time. Please don’t feel too bad about this.

I used to be so confused that sometimes I used “am” and sometimes I used “is”, either way, I was never corrected, which made me confused even more. So I think it is possible that both ways sound correct even to the native speakers – of course, this is just my wild guess.

The bottom line is: as a language, English is as difficult as Italian. :)
Last edited by jade on Thu Nov 20, 2008 5:46 am, edited 1 time in total.

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giuseppe
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Postby giuseppe » Wed Nov 19, 2008 6:50 pm

By the way, this is what I've found today: Nobody but he would do a thing like that.
My candle burns at both ends
It will not last the night
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends
It gives a lovely light.

iansaldanha
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Postby iansaldanha » Mon Mar 02, 2009 12:12 pm

[quote="jade"][quote="Peter"]As a language, English is as difficult as Italian=wrong setence
you can say English is difficult as Italian
English as difficult as Italian is.

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ladybird
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Postby ladybird » Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:55 pm

iansaldanha wrote:
jade wrote:
Peter wrote:As a language, English is as difficult as Italian=wrong setence
you can say English is difficult as Italian
English as difficult as Italian is.


Ciao Ian

I cannot see anything wrong with Jade's sentence.. :?
Life is for living and learning.

Roby
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Postby Roby » Mon Mar 02, 2009 3:46 pm

iansaldanha wrote:
jade wrote:
Peter wrote:As a language, English is as difficult as Italian=wrong setence
you can say English is difficult as Italian
English as difficult as Italian is.



You can say it either way.... as...as

http://www.learnenglish.org.uk/grammar/ ... es_as.html

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/as+%E2%80%A6+as
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Roby
Roby

"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."



"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."

- François de La Rochefoucauld


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