ulster

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biagio
Posts: 117
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 9:29 am

ulster

Post by biagio » Mon Aug 31, 2009 3:35 pm

In a Patricia Cornwell's book I've found the word "ulster" obviously referred to a piece of clothing women used to wear in the Nineteenth century.
Since I couldn't find it in any of my dictionaries, here I am asking for its precise meaning. In other words, what was an "ulster"?
Can anybody help me?

Scoob94P
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 8:27 pm
Location: England

Post by Scoob94P » Mon Aug 31, 2009 4:05 pm

I did a quick search for you and i got the results 'a long, loose overcoat made of rough material'

:?

i hope that helps :)

Edit: I found a picture too: http://www.agelesspatterns.com/images/1251.GIF

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Chris Corbyn
Posts: 335
Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 5:32 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Post by Chris Corbyn » Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:31 pm

I'm English and I had never heard of this word in reference to clothing :) It's certainly not a word used in modern English (unless talking about the place... Northern Ireland also = Ulster).

Roby
Posts: 3850
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:06 pm

Re: ulster

Post by Roby » Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:20 am

biagio wrote:In a Patricia Cornwell's book I've found the word "ulster" obviously referred to a piece of clothing women used to wear in the Nineteenth century.
Since I couldn't find it in any of my dictionaries, here I am asking for its precise meaning. In other words, what was an "ulster"?
Can anybody help me?
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ulster

: a long loose overcoat of Irish origin made of heavy material (as frieze)
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

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