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Traduzione di una canzone country

Posted: Mon Aug 31, 2009 6:36 pm
by lucagalbu
Hi all! I have some problems trying to translate this song in italian. The song is "Play something country" by Brooks and Dunn.

The first verse is:
Yes, she blew through the door like TNT,
Put her hand on her hip, pointed a finger at me.
Said: "I'm a whiskey drinkin', cowboy chasin', helluva time.
"I like Kenny, Keith, Allan and Patsy Cline.
"I'm a full grown Queen Bee lookin' for honey.
"Ha-ooh-hoo, aw, play somethin' country."

What does "helluva time mean?"

The refrain is:
Crank up the band, play the steel guitar.
Hank it up a little, let's rock this bar.
Threw back a shot; yelled: "I'm a George Strait junkie.
"Ha-ooh-hoo, play somethin' country.
"Ha-ooh-hoo, aw, play somethin' country."

What does "Hank it up a little" mean?

Re: Traduzione di una canzone country

Posted: Mon Aug 31, 2009 8:25 pm
by Roby
lucagalbu wrote:Hi all! I have some problems trying to translate this song in italian. The song is "Play something country" by Brooks and Dunn.

The first verse is:
Yes, she blew through the door like TNT,
Put her hand on her hip, pointed a finger at me.
Said: "I'm a whiskey drinkin', cowboy chasin', helluva time.
"I like Kenny, Keith, Allan and Patsy Cline.
"I'm a full grown Queen Bee lookin' for honey.
"Ha-ooh-hoo, aw, play somethin' country."

What does "helluva time mean?"

IT MEANS TO HAVE A GOOD TIME...

The refrain is:
Crank up the band, play the steel guitar.
Hank it up a little, let's rock this bar.
Threw back a shot; yelled: "I'm a George Strait junkie.
"Ha-ooh-hoo, play somethin' country.
"Ha-ooh-hoo, aw, play somethin' country."

What does "Hank it up a little" mean?

HANK IT UP MEANS HE IS REFERRING TO HANK WILLIAMS JR. or EVEN HANK'S FATHER HANK WILLIAMS.... PLAY A LITTLE HANK FOR ME.


Posted: Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:42 pm
by Chris Corbyn
Helluva is very slang English but is used very often across all English speaking countries as far as I'm aware.

I believe it is a contraction of three words: "Hell of a", so "Hell of a time" meaning a crazy time.

The English seem to (in the use of slang) contract certain idiomatic phrases in strange ways like this.

Another similar example would be "Sunnuva bitch" = "Son of a bitch".
And a common one: "I'm Gonna / Gunna" = "I'm Going to <do something>".

I think they get written this way sometimes in order to place emphasis on the accent in which they're pronounced... Deliberately slurred in order to sound dumbed-down.

Posted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:44 pm
by lucagalbu
Chris Corbyn wrote:Helluva is very slang English but is used very often across all English speaking countries as far as I'm aware.

I believe it is a contraction of three words: "Hell of a", so "Hell of a time" meaning a crazy time.
In fact in some lyrics of this song there is written "Said: "I'm a whiskey drinkin', cowboy chasin', hell of the time"


Thanks for your answers!

Posted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 6:48 pm
by Peter
Chris Corbyn wrote:Helluva is very slang English but is used very often across all English speaking countries as far as I'm aware.

I believe it is a contraction of three words: "Hell of a", so "Hell of a time" meaning a crazy time.

The English seem to (in the use of slang) contract certain idiomatic phrases in strange ways like this.

Another similar example would be "Sunnuva bitch" = "Son of a bitch".
And a common one: "I'm Gonna / Gunna" = "I'm Going to <do something>".

I think they get written this way sometimes in order to place emphasis on the accent in which they're pronounced... Deliberately slurred in order to sound dumbed-down.
I agree, Chris. Things like this cannot make learning English any easier! But then there are many Italian idiomatic phrases that take some getting your head round!

Actually, I've not seen son of a bitch written as you have. I'm more used to seeing 'sonofabitch' - still one long string for 4 proper words! :)

Posted: Mon Sep 21, 2009 2:34 pm
by biagio
Is that song full of (sexual) double entendres or am I wrong?