English etymological dictionary sought

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calum
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English etymological dictionary sought

Post by calum » Wed Apr 24, 2013 12:31 pm

I'll ask this question here since the same request within the English language forum of wordreference.com was deleted as being "outwith the scope of the forum" !

I'm looking for a decent etymological dictionary in the UK and my budget is around £30-£40, can anyone suggest one in that price bracket?

When I'm online I use http://www.etymonline.com but sometimes I prefer to just let myself wander through a reference book, with no particular goal in mind other than discovery.

thanks,
Calum

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Itikar
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Re: English etymological dictionary sought

Post by Itikar » Wed Apr 24, 2013 2:11 pm

In my opinion the best one is the Oxford English Dictionary (electronic edition). Personally I am quite satisfied with the fourth version.

However in the public domain and for free you can get the (very) old edition of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary. It quotes less cognates in Dutch and Swedish in comparison to the modern Oxford but I think it shouldn't be so decisive. :)
http://archive.org/details/con00ciseoxforddicfowlrich

I found also these old etymological dictionaries that seem cool:
http://archive.org/details/webstersetymolo00fegoog
http://archive.org/details/universaletymolo00bail
http://archive.org/details/chamberssetymol00chamgoog
http://archive.org/details/anetymologicald00keaggoog
http://archive.org/details/Etymological ... Dictionary
I would be very grateful, if you could please correct my English.

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calum
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Re: English etymological dictionary sought

Post by calum » Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:26 pm

Itikar wrote:In my opinion the best one is the Oxford English Dictionary (electronic edition). Personally I am quite satisfied with the fourth version.

However in the public domain and for free you can get the (very) old edition of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary. It quotes less cognates in Dutch and Swedish in comparison to the modern Oxford but I think it shouldn't be so decisive. :)
http://archive.org/details/con00ciseoxforddicfowlrich

I found also these old etymological dictionaries that seem cool:
http://archive.org/details/webstersetymolo00fegoog
http://archive.org/details/universaletymolo00bail
http://archive.org/details/chamberssetymol00chamgoog
http://archive.org/details/anetymologicald00keaggoog
http://archive.org/details/Etymological ... Dictionary

Thanks for those links, Alessandro, they look useful. However, I'm looking for a real book - one I can hold in my hands! (I'm old-fashioned that way.)

It quotes less fewer cognates in Dutch and Swedish in comparison to the modern Oxford ...
I've made a small correction to your post above. It's a minor point, and one which many native English speakers get wrong. With countable nouns you use fewer, with uncountable nouns you use less.

e.g.

countable:
fewer people
fewer bottles
fewer words

uncountable:
less water
less weight
less time



... but I think it shouldn't be so decisive.
I'm not sure what you're trying to convey here with the word 'decisive', could you elaborate?

regards,
Calum

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Itikar
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Re: English etymological dictionary sought

Post by Itikar » Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:45 pm

Calum, think global digital! You can bring one of those file to a printing shop and get your book on paper! :D
Well, ok I am not too much into big books, especially if they are hard to find around and I have free stuff available.

Thanks for the correction. Countable and uncontable nouns tend to be a trouble for me.
With "decisive" I meant "very important/relevant". :)
Thanks!
I would be very grateful, if you could please correct my English.

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