I Dolci

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Amela
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I Dolci

Post by Amela » Sat Dec 16, 2006 3:35 am

Ciao a tutti,

Forse potete aiutami. Quando la mia mamma era una ragazza, sua nonna ha avuto una macchina che sia usata a fare i dolci da mano. Ha metteta la pasta nella macchina e ha girato la manovella. La macchina fare solo un tipo di dolce, ma mia madre non li ricorda. Nessuno sa di questa macchina, o il tipo di dolce è fatto?

Mille grazie.

Amy

Gianna
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Re: I Dolci

Post by Gianna » Sat Dec 16, 2006 3:39 pm

Amela wrote:Ciao a tutti,

Forse potete aiutami. Quando la mia mamma era una ragazza, sua nonna aveva una macchina che usava per fare i dolci. Metteva la pasta nella macchina e girava la manovella. La macchina poteva fare solo un tipo di dolce, ma mia madre non ricorda quale. Nessuno sa di questa macchina o del tipo di dolce?

Mille grazie.

Amy

Amy, purtroppo, non conosco la macchina in questione, pertanto nemmeno il dolce.

Potrei fare delle ricerche in merito, ma avrei almeno bisogno di sapere da quale regione o zona d'Italia proveniva la nonna di tua mamma, cioè la tua bisnonna.

Se, poi, la tua mamma ricordasse anche le dimensioni e le fattezze della macchina, sarebbe ancora più facile la ricerca.

Ciao.

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Amela
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Post by Amela » Sun Dec 17, 2006 2:54 am

Gianna,

Grazie per la tua riposta (e la tua correzione). Mia bisnonna abitava a Palermo. La macchina attacca la controtop, forse come una macchina della pasta.

Amy

Gianna
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Post by Gianna » Mon Dec 18, 2006 6:28 pm

Allora, dopo lunga ricerca sono arrivata alla conclusione che il dolce che ricorda la tua mamma sono i "biscotti regina", di cui parla anche Camilleri nei suoi libri.

Ho trovato la ricetta in lingua inglese, la trovi qui http://www.lacucinaeoliana.com/biscotti_regina.html

Spero di aver azzeccato, comunque, questo sito contiene tante ricette siciliane.

Roby
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Post by Roby » Mon Dec 18, 2006 7:00 pm

Amy , Here is another recipe for the Biscotti Regina that Gianna has given you.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes ... 29,00.html

Biscotti Regina (Sesame Seed Cookies)
Recipe courtesy Dan Smith and Steve McDonagh

4 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 sticks butter, at room temperature
1 cup sugar
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup heavy cream
2 cups sesame seeds

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Combine the flour, baking powder and salt in a small bowl and set aside.

Put the butter and sugar into the bowl of a mixer and cream until fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time with the mixer running and beat until smooth. Add the vanilla and beat. Next, add the flour mixture and beat until well incorporated.

To form the cookies, divide the dough in half and roll into logs 1-inch in diameter. Cut the logs into 3-inch lengths. Dip each piece of dough into the cream and then roll in the sesame seeds. Place the cookies on a baking sheet and place in the oven until golden brown, about 15 to 20 minutes.

Let cool and serve. These will keep in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

Roby

Gianna
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Post by Gianna » Mon Dec 18, 2006 7:05 pm

Roby, I saw it, but my choiche went on the other one, because in Italy we usually don't use cream in our biscuits. :roll:


As soon as I can find an originally Italian recipe I'll post it. :wink:

Roby
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Post by Roby » Mon Dec 18, 2006 7:29 pm

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes ... src=search

Pignolatta
Recipe courtesy Gale Gand and Vita Seidita

3 1/2 cups sifted flour, plus more possibly
6 eggs
1 teaspoon salt
Canola oil, for frying
2 cups honey
6 tablespoons sugar
1 (3-ounce) jar confetti sprinkles or lightly toasted pine nuts

In a large ceramic bowl with a wooden spoon or in a mixer with a dough hook mix together the flour, eggs and salt to make a stiff dough that pulls away from the walls of the bowl. You may end up using your hands to finish the job if mixing with a wooden spoon. If the dough is still sticky to the touch add more flour. Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface until smooth and doesn't stick to your fingers. . Quarter the dough and roll the segments into ropes the thickness of 1/2-inch. Cut off knobs of dough 1/2-inch long (some people roll these into balls but I don't).
In a 3 quart saucepan heat oil for deep-frying to 365 degrees F. Fry the dough pieces until golden brown in batches, a handful at a time and drain on a paper towel. The dough will sink in the oil then come floating to the top. They do expand in the oil so leave them some room. Allow them to cool while you make the caramel.
In a large saucepan combine the honey and sugar and bring to a boil. Working quickly with a wooden spoon stir in the fried dough pieces to coat them with the honey caramel. Quickly spoon the sticky dough balls onto 2 plates and form into a tall mound resembling a pine cone, then quickly sprinkle pine nuts or confetti sprinkles over the surface so they stick to the honey caramel before it cools and is no longer sticky. If there's a second person around to help with this, get them. It's a bit of a group or family project. You can also place smaller amounts into foil cup cake cups for individual servings. Let cool and serve. Keeps up to 1 week. To eat just pick off dough pieces and enjoy.

Notes about the recipe: Some spell it Pinolata with one T. It sometimes has pine nuts or "pignolla" stirred into the caramel or is formed into the shape like a pine cone so the name may have come from that. In Sicily they're called Pignolata, in Naples (Italy, not Florida) the same thing is called Struffoli.
I first had this at the holidays at an Italian friends house and they make them every year. But because they're fried they fit for Hanukah too. They're something you serve after a meal and really need coffee to wash them down. It's a very tactile dessert that you pick apart tiny caramelized nugget by tiny caramelized nugget.

Roby

Roby
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Post by Roby » Mon Dec 18, 2006 7:32 pm

Gianna wrote:Roby, I saw it, but my choice went on the other one, because in Italy we usually don't use cream in our biscuits. :roll:


As soon as I can find an originally Italian recipe I'll post it. :wink:
Grazie Gianna,

I have located other Sicilian cookie recipes. Since she is not sure of the cookie, maybe after her mother reads the recipes, she can remember something that stands out in the recipe she remembers.
Roby

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Post by Roby » Mon Dec 18, 2006 7:34 pm

http://giamona.com/nucatuli.htm

Nucatuli Cookies (Nugget Cookies)
Submitted by Angela Costanza Warner

Ingredients:

2 lbs. ( boxes) powdered sugar
4 cups flour
5 eggs
1 1/2 tbsp. shortening
3 teaspoons baking powder

* variations for flavoring
1 (Anne Megna's version)
1/2 teaspoon cloves
2 teaspoon nutmeg
2 teaspoon vanilla

2 (Perina Cataldo's version)
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon anise extract
juice from1/2 orange

Directions:

1. Cream eggs, shortening and liquid flavorings. Add all remaining ingredients. On a floured board, roll out long, half inch thick rolls or 'sticks of dough. Cut this diagonally into one and a half inch long little 'logs'.

2. Let stand on the board overnight. The next day, bake at 300 degrees on an ungreased cookie sheet pan for about 20 minutes or until slightly bown and the inside of the cookie has poured out around the little 'log'.

Roby

Roby
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Post by Roby » Mon Dec 18, 2006 7:45 pm

Amy ,

You will find other Sicilian cookies here given by another member of the group.

http://impariamo.com/forum/viewtopic.ph ... sc&start=0

Roby
Last edited by Roby on Tue Dec 19, 2006 11:51 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Amela
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Post by Amela » Tue Dec 19, 2006 5:38 am

Gianna e Roby,

Grazie per il vostro aitua, ma sfortunamente, le ricette non sono giusto. Abbiamo una ricetta per il dolce con sesame (chiamiamo juju). E mia bisnonna usava la macchina solo. Mia zia ha la macchina, forse chiedero se fara una foto.

Roby
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Post by Roby » Tue Dec 19, 2006 11:53 am

http://www.recipelink.com/mf/31/5039

Sicilian Fig Cookies

Makes about 4 dozen

Dough:
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup granulated sugar
3/4 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 cup (8 tbsp.) chilled vegetable shortening
2 eggs
1/4 cup milk

Filling:
2 cups (about 12 oz.) Calimyrna figs, stems removed
1/2 cup raisins
1/3 cup slivered almonds
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
1 tsp. grated lemon zest
pinch freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup orange juice

Icing:
1 1/2 cups confectioners' sugar
2 to 3 tbsp. milk
1/4 tsp. vanilla extract
colored sprinkles

In food processor or by hand, mix together flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Distribute shortening over flour and pulse or cut in until mixture resembles fine crumbs. Whisk eggs with milk, then pour through feed tube with motor running or stir in by hand. Mix just until dough begins to clump together. Place dough on a large sheet of plastic wrap, flatten to about a 6-inch square, then wrap and refrigerate at least 30 minutes or up to 2 days, or freeze up to 2 weeks.

To make filling:
Place figs, raisins, almonds, sugar, cinnamon, zest, and pepper in work bowl of food processor. Process until fruits and nuts are very finely chopped. With motor running, add orange juice through feed tube and process only until blended. Filling will be moist and sticky. (Can be used immediately or refrigerated up to 2 days. Return to room temperature before using.) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease 2 large baking sheets. Divide dough in 4 parts and work with one at a time, keeping remainder refrigerated. Divide filling into 4 parts.

On a lightly floured surface, roll dough to a 4-x 14-inch rectangle. (Don't worry if edges are ragged.) Use your hands to distribute 1/4 of filling in a 1-inch strip down center of dough. Use a spatula to help roll long sides of dough over center to enclose filling. Moisten fingers to press down seam. Use a sharp knife to cut filled dough roll into 1-inch diagonal slices. Place slices inverted so side seam is down, about 1-inch apart on baking sheets. Repeat with remaining dough and filling. Bake 18 to 20 minutes until bottoms are pale golden, and dough is very lightly colored. Dough should not brown. Cool on racks.

To make icing:
Whisk confections' sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and vanilla to make a thick drizzling consistency. If necessary, add milk by 1/2 teaspoonful.

Drizzle tops of cookies liberally with icing, then quickly cover with colored sprinkles before icing sets. Let icing set at least 1 hour. Store tightly covered up to 5 days. Cookies can be frozen up to 2 weeks.

Roby

Roby
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Post by Roby » Tue Dec 19, 2006 12:34 pm

http://www.eat-online.net/english/habit ... _reali.htm

Neapolitan Christmas cookies

Paste Reali

For the frosting:
2 1/3 cups sugar

4/5 cup water

A pinch sodium bicarbonate


For the pastries:
3/4 pound shelled almonds

1 pinch powdered cinnamon

1 2/3 cups sugar

2 fingers (of a glass) water

Edible rice paper or wafers of the kind used for communion, about 3 inches in diameter. Silvered or colored candied almonds (you should be able to find these in a wedding supply store).


Bring some water to a boil, remove it from the fire, and soak the almonds for 5 minutes. Pat them dry and rub the skins away, then grind them by running them through a meat grinder three times, then a food mill once, sprinkling them with a little water to keep them from giving off their oil (you can also use a blender, using short bursts. You don't want to turn them into an oily paste or liquefy them).

Combine the 2 fingers of water and the sugar in a pot (if it's round-bottomed, so much the better) and heat, stirring gently, until a drop of syrup poured from the spoon onto a plate does not spread out, and when crushed between thumb and forefinger forms fine threads when you separate your fingers. Add the almonds and cinnamon, and cook over a very low flame, stirring constantly, for 10 minutes. Remove the mixture from the fire and let it cool, stirring frequently. When it is almost cold, spread the it in a half-inch thick layer over the wafers, smoothing the top and sides with the blade of a knife. Depending upon the shape of your wafers you will end up with either diamond or round shaped cookies; they should be about 2 inches across at the most.

Let the cookies set for 24 hours, then trim away the excess wafer.

Prepare the icing by boiling the syrup to the stage described above. Test frequently because if you cook too long the syrup will be too hard. Once it reaches the proper degree of doneness pour the syrup into a bowl and whip it until it is white and fluffy (this takes patience). Spread the frosting over the cookies, dot each with a candied almond, and let dry.

These will keep for several days, though you can expect them to vanish first.

Roby

Roby
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Post by Roby » Tue Dec 19, 2006 12:41 pm

Amy,

Here is a link to a Sicilian recipe site where you can find all types of Sicilian recipes.


http://www.lacucinaeoliana.com/

Roby

Roby
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Post by Roby » Tue Dec 19, 2006 12:48 pm

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes ... 21,00.html

Holiday Biscotti
Recipe courtesy Giada De Laurentiis

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 large eggs
3/4 cup pistachios, coarsely chopped
2/3 cup dried cranberries
12 ounces good-quality white chocolate, chopped
Red and green sugar crystals, for garnish

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
Line a heavy large baking sheet with parchment paper. Whisk the flour and baking powder in a medium bowl to blend. Using an electric mixer, beat the sugar, butter, lemon zest, and salt in a large bowl to blend. Beat in the eggs 1 at a time. Add the flour mixture and beat just until blended. Stir in the pistachios and cranberries.

Form the dough into a 13-inch long, 3-inch wide log on the prepared baking sheet. Bake until light golden, about 40 minutes. Cool for 30 minutes.

Place the log on the cutting board. Using a sharp serrated knife, cut the log on a diagonal into 1/2 to 3/4-inch-thick slices. Arrange the biscotti, cut side down, on the baking sheet. Bake the biscotti until they are pale golden, about 15 minutes. Transfer the biscotti to a rack and cool completely.

Stir the chocolate in a bowl set over a saucepan of simmering water until the chocolate melts. Dip half of the biscotti into the melted chocolate. Gently shake off the excess chocolate. Place the biscotti on the baking sheet for the chocolate to set. Sprinkle with the sugar crystals. Refrigerate until the chocolate is firm, about 35 minutes.

The biscotti can be made ahead. Store them in an airtight container up to 4 days, or wrap them in foil and freeze in resealable plastic bags up to 3 weeks

Roby

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