Active or Passive Usage

Have a question about Italian grammar? Need a quick translation from Italian to English or vice versa? Post it here!
Post Reply
johnk
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:26 pm

Active or Passive Usage

Post by johnk » Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:37 pm

Hi There,
Is it better in Italian to say:
- Ero sposato con una donna francese
or
- Sono stato sposato con una donna francese
In English I would say "I was married to a French woman" but I can't determine which is correct Italian
Thanks

Geoff
Posts: 251
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 7:55 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Geoff » Sun Feb 11, 2018 1:25 am

It depends upon on what you are trying to say. If you mean that you were married to a french woman, in the sense that you used to be married to her, then Ero sposato con una donna francese is correct.

If, however, you mean that you got married to a french woman, it should be Mi sono sposato con una donna francese or Ho sposato una donna francese. You can also say Mi sono sposato una donna francese, but not in formal speech or writing.

johnk
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:26 pm

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by johnk » Sun Feb 11, 2018 1:44 am

Thanks very much.

Tom S. Fox
--BANNED--
Posts: 35
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 12:10 pm

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Tom S. Fox » Sun Feb 11, 2018 2:09 pm

Geoff wrote:
Sun Feb 11, 2018 1:25 am
It depends upon on what you are trying to say. If you mean that you were married to a french woman, in the sense that you used to be married to her, then Ero sposato con una donna francese is correct.
That is completely backwards. If you wanted to say that you used to be married to a Frenchwoman, i.e., you aren’t any longer, the correct choice would be, “Sono stato sposato con una donna francese.”

Ero sposato con una donna francese,” doesn’t tell us anything about whether or not you are still married to her, unless you add a phrase such as “una volta,” “un tempo,” “prima,” etc.

This can be easily proven by looking at usage examples:
Sono stato sposato con lei per sette anni …

I was married to her for seven years…
The fact it says “for seven years” doesn’t leave any doubt: They aren’t married anymore. Hence why it says, “sono stato sposato,” rather than, “ero sposato,” which would be ungrammatical.

One the other hand, we have sentences such as…
If we translate this under the assumption that “era sposato” means “used to be married,” the result is blatantly self-contradictory nonsense:
*The director also said that at the time of the supposed “infidelity,” he already used to be married to his current wife…
Incidentally, “ero sposato” and “sono stato sposato” are both active. The difference is that the former is in the imperfect tense, while the latter is in the present perfect tense.

Geoff
Posts: 251
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 7:55 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Geoff » Sun Feb 11, 2018 11:24 pm

Fair comment. Thanks.

Dylan Thomas
Posts: 105
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2012 11:08 pm

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Dylan Thomas » Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:44 pm

Tom:
That is completely backwards. If you wanted to say that you used to be married to a Frenchwoman, i.e., you aren’t any longer, the correct choice would be, “Sono stato sposato con una donna francese.”
“Ero sposato con una donna francese,” doesn’t tell us anything about whether or not you are still married to her, unless you add a phrase such as “una volta,” “un tempo,” “prima,” etc.

(1) I’m afraid you are not correct, Tom. In Italian “Sono stato sposato con una donna francese” and “Ero sposato con una donna francese” mean the same thing. I personally prefer the latter.
Moreover, “Ero sposato” does not need any of those phrases; the “imperfetto” (ero) by itself usually means that I’m not married anymore.

If I say, “Mi hanno detto che eri sposato con un’americana”
(“I was told you were married to an American woman”)
I don’t need to add anything else, the context being understood (two years ago / before you married a French woman).

It’s true, however, that we sometimes need context to clarify things:

Ero sposato con la mia ex moglie quando la nostra casa di campagna fu svaligiata.
I was married to my ex wife when our country house was burgled.
[I might be living alone now, but also married to another woman]

Ero sposato con la mia attuale moglie quando la nostra casa di campagna fu svaligiata.
I was married to my current wife when our country house was burgled.
[I’m clearly still married.]


Tom:
This can be easily proven by looking at usage examples:
Sono stato sposato con lei per sette anni …

I was married to her for seven years…
The fact it says “for seven years” doesn’t leave any doubt: They aren’t married anymore. Hence why it says, “sono stato sposato,” rather than, “ero sposato,” which would be ungrammatical.

(2) I’m sorry Tom but your line of reasoning is not correct. The time expression “per sette anni” always requires a “present perfect tense”. That is why “ero sposato” would be ungrammatical.

Sono stato sposato / Ero sposato con una donna francese quando abitavo a Roma.
I was married to a French woman when I lived in Rome.
(Honestly, I would always use “ero sposato”.)

DT

User avatar
Peter
Posts: 2899
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 12:41 pm
Location: Horsham, West Sussex, England

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Peter » Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:57 pm

Excellent post, Dylan. Very clear, very logical. Thank you.

Tom S. Fox
--BANNED--
Posts: 35
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 12:10 pm

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Tom S. Fox » Fri Feb 23, 2018 5:59 pm

Dylan Thomas wrote:
Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:44 pm
I’m afraid you are not correct, Tom. In Italian “Sono stato sposato con una donna francese” and “Ero sposato con una donna francese” mean the same thing.
I have shown proof to the contrary in my previous post, and your only retort is, “Nuh-uh!”
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:44 pm
Moreover, “Ero sposato” does not need any of those phrase; the “imperfetto” (ero) by itself usually means that I’m not married anymore.
Actually, the imperfect tense never means that something isn’t the case anymore. It may be obvious from context, or it may be explicitly stated, as I mentioned, but the imperfect tense doesn’t signal it. That’s the job of the preterit and the present perfect.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:44 pm
If I say, “Mi hanno detto che eri sposato con un’americana”
(“I was told you were married to an American woman”)
I don’t need to add anything else, the context being understood (two years ago / before you married a French woman).
That is just plain wrong. The response to, “Mi hanno detto che eri sposato con un’americana,” might very well be, “Lo sono.”

The same is true in English:

— “I was told you were married to an American woman.”
— “I am.”

In fact, here is an example of that very scenario:
“Sì. Mi hanno detto che eri occupato.”
“Lo sono.”


“Yes. I was told you were busy.”
“I am.”
Here is another example:
… mi hanno detto che eri qui e sono venuto.

…I was told you were here and came.
The addressee is obviously still “here,” otherwise she wouldn’t be able to hear this.
It’s true, however, that we sometimes need context to clarify things:

Ero sposato con la mia ex moglie quando la nostra casa di campagna fu svaligiata.
I was married to my ex wife when our country house was burgled.
[I might be living alone now, but also married to another woman]
I’m not talking about being married to another woman, I’m talking about still being married to the same woman, which could also be the case if you removed the “ex.”
Ero sposato con la mia attuale moglie quando la nostra casa di campagna fu svaligiata.
I was married to my current wife when our country house was burgled.
[I’m clearly still married.]
You just cited an example where, “ero sposato,” doesn’t mean that the speaker isn’t married anymore. That’s an admission I was right.
I’m sorry Tom but your line of reasoning is not correct. The time expression “per sette anni” always requires a “present perfect tense”. That is why “ero sposato” would be ungrammatical.
First of all, it’s not true that it always requires the present-perfect tense. You could also use the preterit: “Fui sposato con lei per sette anni.”

Secondly, it isn’t even true that stating the duration of an event necessarily excludes the imperfect tense. It is entirely possible to say, “Lavorava per otto ore al giorno” (“He worked eight hours a day”).

So your explanation for why it’s, “sono stato sposato,” is clearly incorrect. It’s for the reason I said it was: because “per sette anni” marks it as a completed event.
Sono stato sposato / Ero sposato con una donna francese quando abitavo a Roma.
I was married to a French woman when I lived in Rome.
(Honestly, I would always use “ero sposato”.)
I’m not sure what point you are trying to make here.

Dylan Thomas
Posts: 105
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2012 11:08 pm

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Dylan Thomas » Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm

Dato che la discussione avviene in un forum di lingua italiana, ho deciso di rispondere alle obiezioni di Tom usando la mia lingua.

(1) Ribadisco che “Sono stato sposato con una donna francese” ed “Ero sposato con una donna francese” veicolano la stessa informazione. Se sono io a pronunciare una delle due frasi, il significato implicito che voglio trasmettere, e che viene percepito da qualunque parlante italiano, è: “adesso non lo sono più”. Altrimenti, avrei usato un tempo presente.
.
(2) Confermo che “ero sposato” non ha bisogno di specificazioni ulteriori. Il parlante sono io (chi meglio di me può conoscere la situazione nella quale attualmente mi trovo?) e l’uso dell’imperfetto mi serve per trasmettere il messaggio di cui al punto 1.
Qui c’è forse un equivoco: stavamo discutendo di “sposato”, per cui alcuni degli esempi che fai a supporto della tua tesi non hanno nulla a che vedere con l’oggetto del contendere.
Tuttavia, li prenderò in considerazione più avanti.

(3) Le cose cambiano se chi parla si rivolge ad una seconda persona (singolare nel nostro caso).

“Mi hanno detto che [tu] eri sposato con un’americana”.

Qui l’implicazione è la seguente:
tono leggermente ascendete sulla frase secondaria (e qui si tratta di “sentire”, sia “feel” sia “hear”, la lingua viva e le sue sfumature).
Se la persona a cui mi rivolto risponde “Sì, e lo sono ancora”, significa che ha percepito dal tono la mia convinzione che non lo fosse più. Altrimenti mi sarei espresso usando il presente: “Mi hanno detto che sei sposato con un’americana”.
(Ci potrebbe anche essere un tono ascendente su “mi hanno detto”, ma non voglio complicare troppo le cose).

(4) Riporto testualmente le battute dei libri che citi perché qui si tratta di un altro caso ancora, diverso dai precedenti:

Andrea. Io non credo nelle coincidenze. Non eri alla stazione di polizia questa mattina?
Gianni. Sì. Mi hanno detto che eri [ma anche: “che sei”] occupato.
Andrea. Lo sono.
Gianni. Vedo.
Andrea. E’ la mia pausa pranzo.

Analogo è il caso della frase “mi hanno detto che eri [ma anche: “che sei”] qui e sono venuto”.

In entrambi i casi è invece vero che l’imperfetto non esprime un evento passato ma una situazione che perdura ancora al presente. Infatti l’imperfetto potrebbe essere sostituito dal presente. Si tratta delle cosiddette “frasi completive”.

(5) Le frasi contenenti “ex moglie” e “attuale moglie” non sostengono la tua tesi.
Le ho proposte semplicemente per (di)mostrare che, anche in presenza di una prima persona singolare, il contesto – qualora il parlante ne senta la necessità – può chiarire se la situazione (essere sposato) persiste o si è conclusa. In entrambi i casi è la secondaria che chiarisce la situazione attuale di chi pronuncia la frase. Quindi anche in presenza di prime persone singolari i casi vanno analizzati singolarmente.
Aggiungo che il significato implicito della frase contenente “attuale moglie” è che sono già stato sposato con un’altra donna, mentre la frase contenente “ex moglie” può voler dire due cose: (a) attualmente sono “libero / single”, oppure (b) mi sono risposato (ma tutto ciò non viene chiaramente esplicitato). Credo che solo un nativo sia in grado di percepire i significati contenenti nelle due frasi.

(6) Di nuovo l’equivoco di cui parlavo prima. Qui stiamo discutendo di “sono stato sposato” che richiede sempre la preposizione “per”.
Non ho mai detto che l’imperfetto rifiuti un’espressione di durata. Mi riferivo alla frase di cui sopra.
D’altra parte, “Lavorava per otto ore al giorno” significa verosimilmente che ora non lavora più così tanto. Io la interpreterei in questo modo, e dunque in questo caso l’imperfetto decreta la fine dell’azione.

(7) Prendiamo in esame questa affermazione: “the imperfect tense never means that something isn’t the case anymore. It may be obvious from context, or it may be explicitly stated, as I mentioned, but the imperfect tense doesn’t signal it. That’s the job of the preterit and the present perfect.”
Vediamo:

A. Sei ingrassato.
B. Mangiavo come un lupo.
(Usando un imperfetto, il mio interlocutore capisce che mi riferisco ad un momento particolare del passato oramai concluso – ad esempio, durante le vacanze – e che ora sono tornato a mangiare come prima.)

Mio figlio faceva sempre colazione con pane e burro.
(Anche in questo caso l’interpretazione è una sola: si tratta di un’abitudine risalente al passato ed interrotta, anche se il parlante non ha sentito la necessità di specificare il momento dell’interruzione.)

Sono stato sposato con una donna francese.
(Nessun dubbio, non lo sono più.)

Sono stato abituato a lavarmi le mani prima di mangiare.
(Abitudine che continua anche nel presente, che non si è mai interrotta.)

Quindi anche il passato prossimo può essere interpretato in due diversi modi:
(a) indicante azione / situazione conclusa;
(b) indicante azione / situazione che continua anche nel presente.

Ultimo esempio:
La giornata era bella, splendeva il sole, ma faceva freddo.
Questa frase può essere analizzata in due modi diversi:
(1) Il parlante è appena tornato dal mare, ora è a casa in una località che dista, supponiamo, 20 chilometri dal mare. L’implicazione è la seguente: quando ho lasciato il luogo di villeggiatura, la giornata era bella, splendeva il sole, ma faceva freddo. Le condizioni atmosferiche potrebbero essere le stesse o potrebbero anche essere cambiate. L’uso dell’imperfetto non lo chiarisce.
(2) Il parlante si riferisce ad una giornata qualunque del passato, con momenti conclusisi in quel passato presumibilmente lontano.)

DT

Tom S. Fox
--BANNED--
Posts: 35
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 12:10 pm

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Tom S. Fox » Sun May 20, 2018 3:27 am

Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Dato che la discussione avviene in un forum di lingua italiana, ho deciso di rispondere alle obiezioni di Tom usando la mia lingua.
Come deſiderate, meſſer Tommaſo. Fo la medeſima coſa pure io, ſe non vi ſcomoda.

Vi prego di perdonare la tardanza di queſta mia riſpoſta. Io non ſapea che haveſte ſcritto un’ulteriore miſſiva in queſto filo doppo tre meſi d’inattivitate. Però vi aſſicuro che mi accinſi a comporre una replica non appena che ne fui venuto a conoſcenza.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Ribadisco che “Sono stato sposato con una donna francese” ed “Ero sposato con una donna francese” veicolano la stessa informazione.
Ho già dimostrato che questo non è il caso. “Era già sposato con l’attuale moglie,” ed “È già stato sposato con l’attuale moglie,” non vogliono dire la stessa cosa.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Confermo che “ero sposato” non ha bisogno di specificazioni ulteriori.
Come ho già spiegato, se vuoi dire l’equivalente di “I used to be married” usando l’imperfetto, la traduzione deve essere qualcosa come: “una volta ero sposato.” “Ero sposato” da solo vuol semplicemente dire: “I was married.”

Basta dare un’occhiata su come “used to” viene di solito tradotto in italiano:
It will be a white stone house just like the one I used to live in… [1]

Sarà una casa di pietra bianca, come quella in cui abitavo una volta … [2]
‘You’re a fan of his, aren’t you?’
Used to be,’ said Benjamin.
[3]

“Sei un suo fan, no?”
“Lo ero, una volta,” disse Benjamin. [4]
I used to think that monsters lived under this bed and now I know monsters don’t always hide. [5]

Una volta pensavo che sotto il mio letto si nascondessero dei mostri, ma adesso so che non sempre i mostri si nascondono. [6]
Ho dovuto mettere i link in un Google Doc, perché da poco il numero di link che si possono usare in un post è limitato a cinque. (Alla gente qui non piacciono i fatti e le prove.)
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Qui c’è forse un equivoco: stavamo discutendo di “sposato”, per cui alcuni degli esempi che fai a supporto della tua tesi non hanno nulla a che vedere con l’oggetto del contendere.
Il verbo sposare non rappresenta un’eccezione per quanto riguarda l’uso dell’imperfetto.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Le cose cambiano se chi parla si rivolge ad una seconda persona …
Nient’affatto. Adesso ti stai inventando cose perché non vuoi ammettere di esserti sbagliato.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Se la persona a cui mi rivolto risponde “Sì, e lo sono ancora”…
Non ho scritto “Sì, e lo sono ancora,” ma “Lo sono.”
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
In entrambi i casi è invece vero che l’imperfetto non esprime un evento passato ma una situazione che perdura ancora al presente.
Sei di nuovo d’accordo con me sul fatto che l’imperfetto non vuol dire che un evento sia finito.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Si tratta delle cosiddette “frasi completive”.
E cosa c'entra, scusa?
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Le frasi contenenti “ex moglie” e “attuale moglie” non sostengono la tua tesi.
Hai proposto un esempio che usa l’imperfetto per un evento non finito. Questo conferma ciò che dico fin da l'inizio: che l’imperfetto non vuol dire che un evento sia finito.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Qui stiamo discutendo di “sono stato sposato” che richiede sempre la preposizione “per”.
Cosa? “Sono stato sposato,” non richiede sempre la preposizione per. Ad esempio:
Sì, sono stato sposato.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Non ho mai detto che l’imperfetto rifiuti un’espressione di durata.
Hai detto: “The time expression ‘per sette anni’ always requires a [sic] ‘present perfect tense.’” Questo non è vero, punto.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
D’altra parte, “Lavorava per otto ore al giorno” significa verosimilmente che ora non lavora più così tanto.
Con l’enfasi su “verosimilmente”.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Prendiamo in esame questa affermazione: “the imperfect tense never means that something isn’t the case anymore. It may be obvious from context, or it may be explicitly stated, as I mentioned, but the imperfect tense doesn’t signal it. That’s the job of the preterit and the present perfect.”
Vediamo:

A. Sei ingrassato.
B. Mangiavo come un lupo.
(Usando un imperfetto, il mio interlocutore capisce che mi riferisco ad un momento particolare del passato oramai concluso – ad esempio, durante le vacanze – e che ora sono tornato a mangiare come prima.)

Mio figlio faceva sempre colazione con pane e burro.
(Anche in questo caso l’interpretazione è una sola: si tratta di un’abitudine risalente al passato ed interrotta, anche se il parlante non ha sentito la necessità di specificare il momento dell’interruzione.)
“Mangiavo come un lupo ‒ e lo faccio ancora.”

“Mio figlio faceva sempre colazione con pane e burro ‒ e lo fa ancora.”

Quello che dici semplicemente non è vero.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Sono stato abituato a lavarmi le mani prima di mangiare.
(Abitudine che continua anche nel presente, che non si è mai interrotta.)
Se sei stato abituato a qualcosa, allora l’abituare è finito.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Le condizioni atmosferiche potrebbero essere le stesse o potrebbero anche essere cambiate. L’uso dell’imperfetto non lo chiarisce.
Ding! Ding! Ding! Ding! È esattamento quello che dico fin dall’inizio!

Tom S. Fox
--BANNED--
Posts: 35
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 12:10 pm

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Tom S. Fox » Sun May 20, 2018 4:45 am

Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Le ho proposte semplicemente per (di)mostrare che, anche in presenza di una prima persona singolare, il contesto – qualora il parlante ne senta la necessità – può chiarire se la situazione (essere sposato) persiste o si è conclusa.
Ho detto la stessa cosa in un tratto che tu hai citato: “It may be obvious from context…”
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Aggiungo che il significato implicito della frase contenente “attuale moglie” è che sono già stato sposato con un’altra donna, mentre la frase contenente “ex moglie” può voler dire due cose: (a) attualmente sono “libero / single”, oppure (b) mi sono risposato (ma tutto ciò non viene chiaramente esplicitato).
Grazie, Capitan Ovvio.
Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
Credo che solo un nativo sia in grado di percepire i significati contenenti nelle due frasi.
Uh, no. Non è così complicato. Eppoi, credi che le cose siano diverse in altre lingue?

Tom S. Fox
--BANNED--
Posts: 35
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 12:10 pm

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Tom S. Fox » Sun May 20, 2018 6:34 am

Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu May 03, 2018 9:21 pm
“Mi hanno detto che [tu] eri sposato con un’americana”.

Qui l’implicazione è la seguente:
tono leggermente ascendete sulla frase secondaria (e qui si tratta di “sentire”, sia “feel” sia “hear”, la lingua viva e le sue sfumature).
Se la persona a cui mi rivolto risponde “Sì, e lo sono ancora”, significa che ha percepito dal tono la mia convinzione che non lo fosse più. Altrimenti mi sarei espresso usando il presente: “Mi hanno detto che sei sposato con un’americana”.
Ecco un’altra citazione che confuta quello che dici qui completamente:
Secondo te avrebbe dovuto usare il presente.

Ed ecco il colpo di grazia per l’idea che “era sposato” vuol necessariamente dire che la persona in questione non è più sposata:
Lui e sua moglie non hanno mai divorziato.

Dylan Thomas
Posts: 105
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2012 11:08 pm

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by Dylan Thomas » Thu Jun 21, 2018 8:40 pm

TTTTTTTT

UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU



YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY

MonAro
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:12 pm

Re: Active or Passive Usage

Post by MonAro » Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 pm

Dylan Thomas wrote:
Thu Jun 21, 2018 8:40 pm
TTTTTTTT

UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU



YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY
¿Qué?

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 5 guests