Mi piace/mi piacerebbe

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ladybird
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Mi piace/mi piacerebbe

Post by ladybird » Wed Jan 17, 2007 10:21 am

Buongiorno a tutti

Qualcuno puo' dirmi se c'è una differenza tra "mi piace" e "mi piacerebbe"?

grazie
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Ember
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Post by Ember » Wed Jan 17, 2007 3:00 pm

Mi piace = I like
Mi piacerebbe = I'd like

:)
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ladybird
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Post by ladybird » Wed Jan 17, 2007 3:20 pm

Ember wrote:Mi piace = I like
Mi piacerebbe = I'd like

:)
"Vorrei" vuol dire "I'd like", vero?
"Vorrei" e "mi piacerebbe" sono intercambiabile? :?
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Twilight
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Post by Twilight » Wed Jan 17, 2007 5:36 pm

Si, perchè I'd want mi dicono che non si usa
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Rolly
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Post by Rolly » Thu Jan 18, 2007 9:15 am

Literally;
Mi piace = it pleases me/ I like (it)
Mi piacerebbe = it would please me / I would like (it)

Vorrei = I want to / I would like to / I wish to
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timLA
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Post by timLA » Thu Jan 18, 2007 11:55 am

Twilight wrote:Si, perchè I'd want mi dicono che non si usa
Ciao, l'uso di "I'd want" o "I would want" non è comune, ma è possibile costruire qualche frase con la forma.

Normally, I would want to go to the movies this afternoon, but I really don't feel well.
I would want to have a fast car, but I cannot afford it.

Puoi fare un Google con "I would want to have" per vedere tanti esempi.

Ma nel senso di chiedere qualcosa, di solito, non si usa.

I would want a beer with my dinner. (NO, o raramente)
I would like a beer with my dinner. (YES!)
Una mucca dice all'altra "Hai letto della "mucca pazza"? L'altra dice "Sì, ho sentito. Che fortuna che io sono un pinguino!

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ladybird
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Post by ladybird » Thu Jan 18, 2007 1:39 pm

Grazie guys

I guessed there was a difference between them but I wasn't quite sure what it was.

Although it's not as common, if I did want to use "piacerebbe" would the following sentence be ok?

"Ti piacerebbe andare in Italia quest'anno?"
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lockettpots
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Post by lockettpots » Thu Jan 18, 2007 2:31 pm

Hi lady bird

Whenever you use the conditional it implies a condition even if it is not explicit therefore:-

"Ti piacerebbe andare in Italia quest'anno?" is fine if the implication is 'would you like to go to Italy this year (if it can be arranged)(if I pay for you)?'

But if you are really saying 'Do you fancy going to Italy this year?' then it would be better to ask 'Hai voglia di andare in Italia quest'anno?'

Or if you are really asking "How do you feel about going to Italy this year"
"Ti va di andare in Italia quest'anno?" (notice the third person use of 'va'.)

As regards the conditional use of volere, I think the problem is that as beginners we are taught that 'vorrei' is a polite way of asking for something as opposed to 'voglio'.

This is true between friends since 'Vorrei un caffe' implies 'I would like a coffee (if it not too much trouble)(if you don't mind) but it certainly is not polite to un barrista or una comessa, where the implication might be 'I would like a coffee if you can be bothered to tear yourself away from the conversation you are having with your friend'.

In such a case the special use of the imperfect is better 'Volevo un caffe''

For the same reason un barrista is more likely to ask 'Cosa voleva?' than 'Cosa vorrebbe?' (What would you like if I decide to serve you?)
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Post by ladybird » Thu Jan 18, 2007 2:45 pm

lockettpots wrote:Hi lady bird

Whenever you use the conditional it implies a condition even if it is not explicit therefore:-

"Ti piacerebbe andare in Italia quest'anno?" is fine if the implication is 'would you like to go to Italy this year (if it can be arranged)(if I pay for you)?'

But if you are really saying 'Do you fancy going to Italy this year?' then it would be better to ask 'Hai voglia di andare in Italia quest'anno?'

As regards the conditional use of volere, I think the problem is that as beginners we are taught that 'vorrei' is a polite way of asking for something as opposed to 'voglio'.

This is true between friends since 'Vorrei un caffe' implies 'I would like a coffee (if it not too much trouble)(if you don't mind) but it certainly is not polite to un barrista or una comessa, where the implication might be 'I would like a coffee if you can be bothered to tear yourself away from the conversation you are having with your friend'.

In such a case the special use of the imperfect is better 'Volevo un caffe''

For the same reason un barrista is more likely to ask 'Cosa voleva?' than 'Cosa vorrebbe?' (What would you like if I decide to serve you?)
Hi John

Wow, that was interesting!

My teacher has taught us that we SHOULD use vorrei if we're ordering something in a restaurant. She said that "voglio" is to be avoided as it's impolite.

While you're here ( :) ) can you tell me a bit about "voglia" please? Ta!
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Post by lockettpots » Thu Jan 18, 2007 3:10 pm

Hi

Voglia is a noun (fem) meaning a wish.

Gli studenti avevano voglia di andare a casa.
The students wanted to go home - The students felt like going home- literally The students had a wish to go home.

It can also be used with another noun again using di

Ho voglia di un gelato - I feel like an icecream- literally I have a wish for an icecream.

I remember as a beginner my teacher too stressed the use of vorrei as opposed to voglio but as I said before, in practice only use vorrei to friends. In restaurants, shops, bars etc 'volevo' is more acceptable. I can only assume that our teachers didn't want to confuse us with the (seemingly) strange use of the imperfect :D
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Post by lockettpots » Thu Jan 18, 2007 3:19 pm

A follow-up to my previous post.

If you are in a shop and they obviously have something (or are expected to have something) use the Mi da' construction

Mi da' un pacchetto di Marlboro

Although this sounds impolite to English ears

Give me a packet of Marlboro

In Italy it is very acceptable, being seen as

Would you give me a packet of Marlboro please
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ladybird
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Post by ladybird » Thu Jan 18, 2007 5:13 pm

lockettpots wrote:Hi

Voglia is a noun (fem) meaning a wish.

Gli studenti avevano voglia di andare a casa.
The students wanted to go home - The students felt like going home- literally The students had a wish to go home.

It can also be used with another noun again using di

Ho voglia di un gelato - I feel like an icecream- literally I have a wish for an icecream.

I remember as a beginner my teacher too stressed the use of vorrei as opposed to voglio but as I said before, in practice only use vorrei to friends. In restaurants, shops, bars etc 'volevo' is more acceptable. I can only assume that our teachers didn't want to confuse us with the (seemingly) strange use of the imperfect :D
I'm learning a lot today!

As regards "voglia", would this sentence work?

"I don't feel like eating at the moment, I'm not hungry"
"Non ho voglia di mangiare in questo momento, non ho fame"

Any good? :|
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lockettpots
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Post by lockettpots » Thu Jan 18, 2007 7:48 pm

sounds good to me :D
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Rolly
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Post by Rolly » Fri Jan 19, 2007 2:33 am

Well done John, Beautifully explained.

It's wise to be aware of "localisms" which can cause confusion, as indeed they often do in everyday English. Viz. the almost brutal use of the language in the NorthEast of Italy (Milano, Bergamo, Brescia) with the quite 'flowery' old fashioned politeness in parts of Sicilia.
I know that doesn't help anyone just starting out with the language, but it is something to be considered by someone moving around the country.

Ciao 4 Nao
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Twilight
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Post by Twilight » Fri Jan 19, 2007 2:32 pm

ladybird wrote:
lockettpots wrote:Hi
As regards "voglia", would this sentence work?

"I don't feel like eating at the moment, I'm not hungry"
"Non ho voglia di mangiare in questo momento, non ho fame"

Any good? :|
Si.
Si può dire anche "non mi va di mangiare in questo momento"

Avere voglia = Andare + a + qualcuno +di + fare qualcosa"

I don't feel like dancing = non mi va di ballare
Ti va di fare due passi? Do you feel like having a walk?

Dubbio: Do you feel like having a walk è coprrecto? Shall we have a walk va bene? Ditemi voi
Claudietto

I am learning English every day, so could you help me by correcting (In private, if you want) anything I have written incorrectly.

ILNY - I Love "Not yet"
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