I'm enjoying..

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ladybird
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I'm enjoying..

Post by ladybird » Thu Apr 05, 2007 3:07 pm

Ciao a tutti

Come si dice "I'm enjoying..qualcosa"?

Per esempio, I'm enjoying a nice cup of tea, I'm enjoying this meal..etc.

Divertirsi? Divertire? Godere?

Dovrei saperlo, ma ho un problema con questi verbi!

Grazie
Life is for living and learning.

Roby
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Post by Roby » Thu Apr 05, 2007 3:56 pm

ladybird wrote:Ciao a tutti

Come si dice "I'm enjoying..qualcosa"?

Per esempio, I'm enjoying a nice cup of tea, I'm enjoying this meal..etc.

Divertirsi? Divertire? Godere?

Dovrei saperlo, ma ho un problema con questi verbi!

Grazie

I'm enjoying this book...

Mi piace questo libro


I'm enjoying myself in Italy

Mi sto divertendo in Italia


I have always enjoyed good health

Ho sempre godato di buona salute



gustare or assaporare enjoy (taste)--relating to food/drink.

I am enjoying a nice cup of tea.

Mi gusto una buona tazza di te'


GODERE-- Be careful when using this verb. Read the link.
http://www.impariamo.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1209

Any additional explanations are welcomed as always.
Roby

Carlo
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Post by Carlo » Thu Apr 05, 2007 4:12 pm

Roby

Your translation is perfect (as usual :D ): mi gusto una buona tazza di tè. You could also use the present continuous here: mi sto gustando...

As for "godere" I think it would be a shame to avoid using this verb because it can have a sexual meaning. What's more, when used as a reflexive verb (godersi), it cannot have any sexual meaning so it's perfectly safe to use. How else could one say "he knows how to enjoy life" in Italian otherwise?

Lui sì che sa godersi la vita

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ladybird
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Post by ladybird » Thu Apr 05, 2007 5:05 pm

Thank you both for the useful info.

It's good to know about gustare, the other verbs didn't seem to be what I was looking for.
Life is for living and learning.

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ladybird
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Post by ladybird » Thu Apr 05, 2007 5:15 pm

moodywop wrote:Roby

Your translation is perfect (as usual :D ): mi gusto una buona tazza di tè. You could also use the present continuous here: mi sto gustando...

As for "godere" I think it would be a shame to avoid using this verb because it can have a sexual meaning. What's more, when used as a reflexive verb (godersi), it cannot have any sexual meaning so it's perfectly safe to use. How else could one say "he knows how to enjoy life" in Italian otherwise?

Lui sì che sa godersi la vita
Carlo, could you explain to me what "Lui si che"means in the context of this sentence?

Sorry for the dumb question, it's just so it makes sense in my head!
Life is for living and learning.

Carlo
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Post by Carlo » Thu Apr 05, 2007 5:21 pm

Hi Angela

"Sì che" is used to emphasize what follows, so I guess my example would be something like "now here's someone who really knows how to enjoy life!".

In many cases you can use an emphatic "do" in English:

- Mario Rossi? Non mi sembra di conoscerlo
- Ma sì che lo conosci! Era alla tua festa di compleanno

I suppose you could say "you do know him!" in this context, couldn't you?

[/i]

Roby
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Post by Roby » Thu Apr 05, 2007 6:04 pm

moodywop wrote:Roby

Your translation is perfect (as usual :D ): mi gusto una buona tazza di tè. You could also use the present continuous here: mi sto gustando...

As for "godere" I think it would be a shame to avoid using this verb because it can have a sexual meaning. What's more, when used as a reflexive verb (godersi), it cannot have any sexual meaning so it's perfectly safe to use. How else could one say "he knows how to enjoy life" in Italian otherwise?

Lui sì che sa godersi la vita
Grazie per i complimenti Carlo.

Grazie per le informazioni di godersi. Including si che

Godere means :enjoy , love savor.

In the reference to love is where it has the sexual meaning.

Godere di to get pleasure from: enjoy, like

Godo di buon salute. Comunque, Stefania non gode di buon salute . Lei ha tanti problemi.

If you use it to mean savor, could it have sexual context?

Godersi--- means to enjoy something. (cannot have a sexual reference)

Your example:
Lui sì che sa godersi la vita

Could you say:

Marco ed Ernesto si che sanno godersi fare un viaggio/ godersi il viaggio.
They know how to enjoy travelling.


To help someone know how to use godersi are there certain "somethings" that you can use with this verb? Could you list some examples?

Grazie in anticipo
Roby

Carlo
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Post by Carlo » Thu Apr 05, 2007 6:40 pm

Hi Roby

The point is that "godere" can only mean "experience sexual pleasure" when it is used on its own, without any obiect. So if a learner wants to be safe all he/she has to do is avoid using it on its own.

Apart from "godere" followed by "di" (di buona salute, della fiducia di tutti, di buona fama) I think its most frequent use is as a reflexive, "godersi".

Ha deciso di andarsene in pensione e godersi la vita/i suoi risparmi

Siediti e goditi lo spettacolo

As for:

"Marco ed Ernesto si che sanno godersi fare un viaggio/ godersi il viaggio.
They know how to enjoy travelling"

You can only use a noun, not a verb, after "godersi" so you need to omit "fare".
Since you're speaking about travelling in general I'd opt for "un viaggio". If you say "il viaggio" it sounds as if you are talking about a specific trip. Maybe you could say it while pointing at a couple who are clearly enjoying the trip which is taking place.

Edit: it should be "sì che", not "si che"

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ladybird
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Post by ladybird » Thu Apr 05, 2007 8:41 pm

moodywop wrote:Hi Angela

"Sì che" is used to emphasize what follows, so I guess my example would be something like "now here's someone who really knows how to enjoy life!".

In many cases you can use an emphatic "do" in English:

- Mario Rossi? Non mi sembra di conoscerlo
- Ma sì che lo conosci! Era alla tua festa di compleanno

I suppose you could say "you do know him!" in this context, couldn't you?

[/i]
In this context you definitely could say it.
Another way that springs to mind is :"but of course you know him"

This thread has been very enlightening, I think I need to go away and revise i verbi reflessivi..ancora una volta :roll:
Life is for living and learning.

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Ember
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Post by Ember » Fri Apr 06, 2007 11:06 am

Anche "mi sto godendo..:" (es. questo libro)
*** homo sum: humani nihil a me alienum puto ***

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