Help on conjugation of Stare and Essere

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Secundino11
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Help on conjugation of Stare and Essere

Post by Secundino11 » Mon Apr 30, 2007 12:37 am

I would like to understand these two verbs, and their differences well before I go further in learning Italian, or might this be too advance for me? Sorry if I've been asking for too much help :oops:

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Devery
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Re: Help on conjugation of Stare and Essere

Post by Devery » Mon Apr 30, 2007 12:55 am

Secundino11 wrote:I would like to understand these two verbs, and their differences well before I go further in learning Italian, or might this be too advance for me? Sorry if I've been asking for too much help :oops:
See my posts in your Thread "translation help."

And don't be afraid to ask. We all started somewhere, right?

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Secundino11
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Post by Secundino11 » Mon Apr 30, 2007 1:21 am

heh, thank you. It's just that I have nothing to offer, and all I do is ask ask ask :(

on topic :
I found a good site that explains the two verbs in depth -
http://www.geocities.com/f_pollett/i-21-1.htm

from what I understand, when stare is used as an auxilary verb it's translation will be

he is
they are
etc...

otherwise I'll be using essere instead.

So if what I stated above is true : Il cavallo sta saltando would translate to The horse is jumping.

I also found this:
Essere is used in several differen't ways:

* To describe nationalities, origins, and inherent unchanging qualities:
* To identify the subject or describe the subject's character traits:
* To talk about the time:
* To talk about the date:
* To indicate a possesion:
* For uncertain impersonal expressions:

Stare is used:

* To describe a temporary state or condition of the subject:
* To express a location:
* In many idiomatic expressions:
* To form the progressive tenses:
So in my case, I would be using stare to describe a temporary state or condtion the horse - correct?

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Devery
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Post by Devery » Mon Apr 30, 2007 1:42 am

Secundino11 wrote:heh, thank you. It's just that I have nothing to offer, and all I do is ask ask ask :(

on topic :
I found a good site that explains the two verbs in depth -
http://www.geocities.com/f_pollett/i-21-1.htm

from what I understand, when stare is used as an auxilary verb it's translation will be

he is
they are
etc...

otherwise I'll be using essere instead.

So if what I stated above is true : Il cavallo sta saltando would translate to The horse is jumping.
I think that site is a little intermediate for you. Again, you should look at ESSERE as the verb that describes being.
I am, you are, we are, etc.

I sono
I am

Tu sei
You are

Lui/lei e'
He/she is

noi siamo
we are

loro sono
they are

voi siete
you guys are

STARE means (mostly) to stay, but is used to describe health related things.

Io sto
I stay

tu stai
you stay

lui/lei sta
he/she stays

noi stiamo
we stay

loro stanno
they stay

voi state
you guys stay

examples of ESSERE

sono contento
I am happy

tu sei simpatico
You are nice

Loro sono strani
They are strange

these are self explanatory, I am, you are, etc.

Examples of STARE, this is a little more difficult, but mot impossible.

Come stai?
How are you (actually, how do you stay?)?

Sto bene, grazie
I'm fine, thanks (I stay good, thanks).

Quanto tempo state in italia?
how long are you guys staying in Italy?

Come sta tuo fratello
how's your brother

Do you see how Stare can interchange between "being" and "staying?"
Just practice!

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Post by Devery » Mon Apr 30, 2007 1:45 am

As far as your beloved horse is concerned I ask you not to think too much.

Look at it this way.

Instead of the horse is jumping (this VERY MOMENT), it stays jumping

Instead of me reading, I stay reading.
Instead of me wanting, in Italian I stay wanting (again, AT THIS VERY MOMENT--not in the past, not in the future--any verb in English that ends with an ing!!!!)
Last edited by Devery on Mon Apr 30, 2007 1:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Secundino11
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Post by Secundino11 » Mon Apr 30, 2007 1:51 am

Secundino11 wrote: I also found this:
Essere is used in several differen't ways:

* To describe nationalities, origins, and inherent unchanging qualities:
* To identify the subject or describe the subject's character traits:
* To talk about the time:
* To talk about the date:
* To indicate a possesion:
* For uncertain impersonal expressions:

Stare is used:

* To describe a temporary state or condition of the subject:
* To express a location:
* In many idiomatic expressions:
* To form the progressive tenses:
So in my case, I would be using stare to describe a temporary state or condtion the horse - correct?
so my interpretation of the uses of stare is incorrecct?

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Post by Devery » Mon Apr 30, 2007 1:53 am

No, sono giuste.

No, they are correct.

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Secundino11
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Post by Secundino11 » Mon Apr 30, 2007 1:59 am

So wouldn't jumping be the state that my subject (the horse) is in?

Thus me using stare ??

Also I found some more stuff :P
Here wrote: stare is used to indicate precise locations, in idioms and as auxiliary, such as -

1. Idiomatic sentences - Sto bene.("I am well.")
2. Idiomatic sentences - Sto male.("I feel bad.")
3. Location - La sedia sta in cucina. ("The chair is in the kitchen.")
4. Continuous tense - Sto correndo.("I am running.")
So when used in continuous tense - The horse is jumping (lol, sorry) would be Il cavallo sta saltando

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Devery
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Post by Devery » Mon Apr 30, 2007 2:02 am

Practice the heck out of these two verbs and learn them. Find as many examples of them as you can (simple ones) and go from there.

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Secundino11
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Post by Secundino11 » Mon Apr 30, 2007 2:04 am

I'm trying my best.

thanks :wink:

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Post by keithatengagedthinking » Mon Apr 30, 2007 2:56 am

Change of state usually means a change in the emotional state of something, like when asking someone how they are doing. The verb stare is used when you asking someone how they are because, like most people, it's not a permanent state.

Come stai? = How are you? (informal)
Come sta? = How are you? (formal)

A typical reply would be: Sto bene or simply Bene. (There are other replies, too).

Stare can also be used for location, but I read in an Italian grammar book that essere can also be used also to express location.

Stare + per = to be about to

Sto per andare a letto. = I am about to go to bed.

Stare
is also used with the present and past progressive.

I am reading... = Sto leggendo
I was reading...= Stavo leggendo

And last but not least, stare can also mean 'to stay' or 'to remain'. There are also many idiomatic expressions too. I wouldn't worry too much about the differences - you will know them when you see them.

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Secundino11
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Post by Secundino11 » Mon Apr 30, 2007 3:16 am

So in the sentence: Il cavallo sta saltando

the verb stare is being used in the present progressive, therefore this is one of the few times it means to be, right??

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Post by keithatengagedthinking » Mon Apr 30, 2007 4:32 am

Yes, you are right.

In that context (The horse is jumping) is when stare means 'to be'. Stare means 'to be' when it is used with the present participle.

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Secundino11
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Post by Secundino11 » Mon Apr 30, 2007 5:18 am

Gotcha. once again, you guys are all really helpful and I'm feeling great about joining this forum. :)
Essere is used in several differen't ways:

* To describe nationalities, origins, and inherent unchanging qualities:
* To identify the subject or describe the subject's character traits:
* To talk about the time:
* To talk about the date:
* To indicate a possesion:
* For uncertain impersonal expressions:

Stare is used:

* To describe a temporary state or condition of the subject:
* To express a location:
* In many idiomatic expressions:
* To form the progressive tenses:
so that's the one I was thinking of.

Is it too much trouble to ask if someone could write an example for the others?? I'll try doing it myself when I'm a little more advance.

Roby
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Post by Roby » Mon Apr 30, 2007 7:55 am

Stare and Essere mean to be.

Essere

Present Tense of Essere (TO BE verb)

Io sono I am
Tu sei you are (informal)
Lui/lei e' he , she, it is
Lei e' you are (formal)
Noi siamo we are
Voi siete you are (informal)
Loro sono they are, you are (formal)

Stare

(io) sto I am
(tu) stai you are (singular)
(lui/lei, è Lei) sta he/she/it is
(noi) stiamo we are
(voi) state you are (plural)
(loro) stanno

A disussion about Essere and Stare
http://impariamo.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=15858#15858
Roby

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