Being a good tourist!

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keithatengagedthinking
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Being a good tourist!

Post by keithatengagedthinking » Fri Nov 16, 2007 2:44 am

Ciao amici!

I'm writing an article about things that one should not do when traveling, particular when traveling to Italy. I am curious to hear what others feel are things that they've noticed of other tourists (or themselves :lol: ).

For example, on one trip to Rome I was at a cafe with an Italian friend. There was an American couple who were trying to order something at the bar. The barman understood English, but he had trouble understanding the couple. They proceeded to shout very slowly in English at the top of their lungs and getting very frustrated at not being understood!! Finally, I intervened because I felt sorry for them. After I ordered for them, I advised them that they don't have to shout at the top of their lungs but just try to enunciate more and speak slower.

Thanks! :)

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Post by dmj120 » Fri Nov 16, 2007 3:01 am

I think this article will be useful. I hate people who raise their voice in hopes the other person will understand better. I ask those people if I yell at you, will you understand better or just get irritated and unwilling to help?

I can't wait to read your finished article :mrgreen:
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giuseppe
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Post by giuseppe » Fri Nov 16, 2007 7:45 am

...or they could have chosen one of those bars run by American people!
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It will not last the night
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It gives a lovely light.

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timLA
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Post by timLA » Fri Nov 16, 2007 8:48 am

Oh my goodness, I could go on for hours!!!!!

1. learn to use "buongiorno" "buonasera" and "grazie"
2. Don't speak colloquial English, just simple sentences
3. When you approach our Italian friends in Italy say "English OK?"
4. Yes, the key stays at the front desk when you leave! :lol:
5. Use "English menu?"
6. Learn "caffè" means "espresso" and "caffè lungo" means "American coffe"
7. If you are not adventursome, don't order "coratella" or "pajata".
8. No, most taxi drivers won't screw you, you just don't know about getting correct change
9. Yes, it is expensive...but you're on vacation...enjoy
10. No, they don't usually do bacon and eggs for breakfast - try a cornetto!
11. Rome is not just the Sistine Chapel and the colosseum - look for the "little" things.
12. Walk slowly - vat's da rush?
13. Every church you pass must be entered - always something interesting to see!
14. Don't ask for "spaghetti with meat sauce". THIS IS REAL ITALIAN FOOD!!!!
15. Don't carry too much stuff
16. Do put wallet and money in a "safe" place (zippered jacket pocket, hidden belly/leg bag)
17. Don't complain about the price of gas when you return to the US ($3.00 vs $7.00)
18. Don't drive in large cities if you can avoid it - DO drive outside of them - much better than the US

I better stop, Mindy probably doesn't have enough storage on the server! :lol:
Una mucca dice all'altra "Hai letto della "mucca pazza"? L'altra dice "Sì, ho sentito. Che fortuna che io sono un pinguino!

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Ember
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Post by Ember » Fri Nov 16, 2007 10:18 am

Always smile when you ask for informations... I usually spend more time to help nice people :P

I think that beeing a tourist, you're allowed not to know how to eat spaghetti only with the fork :P but try ;) and also try not to cut them... they're cool because they're long :D ahah!

To control if a pizzeria is expensive, check pizza Margherita: if they sell it for more than 6 euro, then it starts to become expensive.

In my town you pay about 1,50 for the smallest cone... probably in Rome they wil cost more and they will be smaller... but think that almost all the ice cream, if home made is good... don't think that spending more money they'll give you a better quality!

Espresso coffee usually cost between 70 and 90 cents.

Movies at the cinema are dubbed, so just go to see italian movies ;) cinema cost from 5,50 to 7,50 euro.
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jade
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Re: Being a good tourist!

Post by jade » Fri Nov 16, 2007 6:49 pm

keithatengagedthinking wrote:Ciao amici!

I'm writing an article about things that one should not do when traveling, particular when traveling to Italy. I am curious to hear what others feel are things that they've noticed of other tourists (or themselves :lol: ).

For example, on one trip to Rome I was at a cafe with an Italian friend. There was an American couple who were trying to order something at the bar. The barman understood English, but he had trouble understanding the couple. They proceeded to shout very slowly in English at the top of their lungs and getting very frustrated at not being understood!! Finally, I intervened because I felt sorry for them. After I ordered for them, I advised them that they don't have to shout at the top of their lungs but just try to enunciate more and speak slower.

Thanks! :)
Please do write your article in English, since you do want to educate Americans, right? :D

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Post by jade » Fri Nov 16, 2007 6:52 pm

timLA wrote:Oh my goodness, I could go on for hours!!!!!

1. learn to use "buongiorno" "buonasera" and "grazie"
2. ....
I heard "ciao" is only used with friends or the people you have spoken with before, is it right?

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timLA
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Post by timLA » Fri Nov 16, 2007 8:04 pm

jade wrote:
timLA wrote:Oh my goodness, I could go on for hours!!!!!

1. learn to use "buongiorno" "buonasera" and "grazie"
2. ....
I heard "ciao" is only used with friends or the people you have spoken with before, is it right?
That's generally correct.
If I'm seeing someone I've never met before (store, hotel, restaurant) I'll most often say buongiorno or buonasera or sera or salve.
I reserve "ciao" for situations where you know the person, or perhaps when I'm talking to a little kid.

But the experts will give us a definitive answer very quickly! :)
Una mucca dice all'altra "Hai letto della "mucca pazza"? L'altra dice "Sì, ho sentito. Che fortuna che io sono un pinguino!

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polideuce
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Post by polideuce » Fri Nov 16, 2007 9:40 pm

Personalmente uso "ciao" quando saluto una persona che conosco, familiari o amici, oppure quando mi rivolgo a un coetaneo o una persona più giovane di me.
Uso invece "salve" quando mi rivolgo a estranei che hanno più anni di me, con queste persone uso anche il "lei" a meno che non mi venga detto di fare altrimenti.
"buongiorno" lo uso sempre con estranei, ma a volte anche con amici o parenti, perché non si tratta proprio di un saluto ma di un augurio...a fare i pignoli anche "salve" è un augurio, ma nell'uso comune se ne è perso il significato originario (ovvero: salute) ed è rimasto come saluto

Roby
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Re: Being a good tourist!

Post by Roby » Fri Nov 16, 2007 10:35 pm

keithatengagedthinking wrote:Ciao amici!

I'm writing an article about things that one should not do when traveling, particular when traveling to Italy. I am curious to hear what others feel are things that they've noticed of other tourists (or themselves :lol: ).

For example, on one trip to Rome I was at a cafe with an Italian friend. There was an American couple who were trying to order something at the bar. The barman understood English, but he had trouble understanding the couple. They proceeded to shout very slowly in English at the top of their lungs and getting very frustrated at not being understood!! Finally, I intervened because I felt sorry for them. After I ordered for them, I advised them that they don't have to shout at the top of their lungs but just try to enunciate more and speak slower.

Thanks! :)
I must say that I have seen many tourists in many different difficult situations, and I have intervened on their behalf.

I, myself, have dealt with Italians who say that they don't understand my Italian..Must say that often they just don't want to stop and Listen. I was with an Italian friend when this happened to me. After we finish the transaction or the dialog with the person, my friend turned to me and said that I had spoken perfectly and that often many Italians don't want to hear foreigners trying to speak the language.
On the hand, I have also been praised for my Italian. I have been told that they appreciate my attempt to speak their language.

If you don't speak the language, Don't shout as Keith has mentioned. Speak slowly and don't be afraid to ask them to repeat what they have said.

1. Write down what you would like on a piece of paper before ordering.
2. If you are looking at a menu while you are sitting down in a restaurant , point to what you would like.
3. Kindly ask the waiter or waitress if he/ she speaks English.
4. Speak slowly and clearly.
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

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keithatengagedthinking
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Post by keithatengagedthinking » Fri Nov 16, 2007 10:38 pm

Thanks, everyone for the suggestions! I got some really good ideas for my article :)


If anyone thinks of anything else, please post it to the forum :)

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Post by Roby » Fri Nov 16, 2007 10:41 pm

polideuce wrote:Personalmente uso "ciao" quando saluto una persona che conosco, familiari o amici, oppure quando mi rivolgo a un coetaneo o una persona più giovane di me.
Uso invece "salve" quando mi rivolgo a estranei che hanno più anni di me, con queste persone uso anche il "lei" a meno che non mi venga detto di fare altrimenti.
"buongiorno" lo uso sempre con estranei, ma a volte anche con amici o parenti, perché non si tratta proprio di un saluto ma di un augurio...a fare i pignoli anche "salve" è un augurio, ma nell'uso comune se ne è perso il significato originario (ovvero: salute) ed è rimasto come saluto
I agree with you here Gabriele.

However, don't be amazed if you greet someone on the street and they do not respond. In the USA , people tend to say hi, good morning, etc. in passing. It just an exchange of pleasantries. In Italy , it is not a common occurrence. Do not be offended if you say "Good morning" to someone on the street in passing and they don't return the pleasantry.
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

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timLA
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Post by timLA » Fri Nov 16, 2007 11:32 pm

polideuce wrote:Personalmente uso "ciao" quando saluto una persona che conosco, familiari o amici, oppure quando mi rivolgo a un coetaneo o una persona più giovane di me.
Uso invece "salve" quando mi rivolgo a estranei che hanno più anni di me, con queste persone uso anche il "lei" a meno che non mi venga detto di fare altrimenti.
"buongiorno" lo uso sempre con estranei, ma a volte anche con amici o parenti, perché non si tratta proprio di un saluto ma di un augurio...a fare i pignoli anche "salve" è un augurio, ma nell'uso comune se ne è perso il significato originario (ovvero: salute) ed è rimasto come saluto
Grazie Polideuce, bella risposta.

Ti do una situazione.
Fai un check-in in un hotel.
La prima volta che parli alla receptionist, dici "Salve/Buongiono, ho prenotato...".
La prossima mattina quando ti encontri la stessa receptionist,
solitamente, cosa dici?
Ciao, salve o buongiorno?

Grazie!
Una mucca dice all'altra "Hai letto della "mucca pazza"? L'altra dice "Sì, ho sentito. Che fortuna che io sono un pinguino!

Roby
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Post by Roby » Sat Nov 17, 2007 12:16 am

timLA wrote:
polideuce wrote:Personalmente uso "ciao" quando saluto una persona che conosco, familiari o amici, oppure quando mi rivolgo a un coetaneo o una persona più giovane di me.
Uso invece "salve" quando mi rivolgo a estranei che hanno più anni di me, con queste persone uso anche il "lei" a meno che non mi venga detto di fare altrimenti.
"buongiorno" lo uso sempre con estranei, ma a volte anche con amici o parenti, perché non si tratta proprio di un saluto ma di un augurio...a fare i pignoli anche "salve" è un augurio, ma nell'uso comune se ne è perso il significato originario (ovvero: salute) ed è rimasto come saluto
Grazie Polideuce, bella risposta.

Ti do una situazione.
Fai un check-in in un hotel.
La prima volta che parli alla receptionist, dici "Salve/Buongiono, ho prenotato...".
La prossima mattina quando ti encontri la stessa receptionist,
solitamente, cosa dici?
Ciao, salve o buongiorno?

Grazie!

I would keep the communication between you and the receptionist professional or respectful .
I would use the lei form... Buongiorno , Signor or Signora. The only time I would change the form is if he/she says it is ok. You are not friends and this a business.
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

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polideuce
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Post by polideuce » Sat Nov 17, 2007 12:50 pm

Roby ha ragione TimLa; è quello che farei anche io.
Con una receptionist, un cameriere, posteggiatore etcc...comunque con persone con le quali i rapporti sono di "affari", ovvero uno dei due sta lavorando, mantengo i rapporti formali.
Non necessariamente uso il "lei" specie se la persona in questione è coetanea, ma pur usando il "tu" cerco di mantenere formale la conversazione.
L'uso del "lei" o del "tu" dipende dall'età dell'interlocutore, mentre l'uso di "ciao" o "buongiorno/salve" dipende da quanto siete in confidenza; perciò, nella situazione che hai descritto, saluterei con "salve/buongiorno" e se la persona è mia coetanea le parlo usando il "tu" ma mantenendo formali i toni in modo da non dare l'impressione di una eccessiva confidenza.

Uno dei miei problemi con l'inglese, uno dei tanti, è che non so come formulare le frasi usando il "lei", dato che "tu" ed "egli" sono sempre "you", quindi mi sento intimidito a parlare perché mi sembra di mancare di rispetto...immagino che con la pratica possa riuscire a superare anche questo impedimento :)

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