Tutto quanto

Have a question about Italian grammar? Need a quick translation from Italian to English or vice versa? Post it here!
Post Reply
User avatar
Devery
Posts: 422
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:38 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Tutto quanto

Post by Devery » Fri Jan 11, 2008 9:46 pm

What does this mean?

User avatar
Devery
Posts: 422
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:38 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Post by Devery » Fri Jan 11, 2008 9:56 pm

I know I'm thinking in English. . .tutto (everything) and quanto (how much). . .and I believe tutto quanto simply means everything. But is there something I am missing?

User avatar
keithatengagedthinking
Posts: 1243
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 11:04 pm
Location: Rome, Italy
Contact:

Post by keithatengagedthinking » Sat Jan 12, 2008 3:51 am

Tutto quanto means everything like you said but it is a more emphatic way of saying it - as a way of providing emphasis.

I guess you could say:

She bought everything in the store.
Ha comprato tutto quanto in negozio.

That's my take on it, but maybe someone has a better interpretation.

Roby
Posts: 3850
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:06 pm

Post by Roby » Sat Jan 12, 2008 4:40 pm

Devery,

Tutto quanto means and all that, and all

I hope this is helpful.
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

User avatar
Devery
Posts: 422
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:38 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Post by Devery » Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:34 am

Roby wrote:Devery,

Tutto quanto means and all that, and all

I hope this is helpful.
Then how would you explain "tutto quanto giorno?"

I would translate that as "every day." (but being MORE emphatic than saying tutto il giorno) Are you saying it could be more along the lines of "all day long?"

This still confuses me. It's just one of those simple things I can't grasp! :?

User avatar
keithatengagedthinking
Posts: 1243
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 11:04 pm
Location: Rome, Italy
Contact:

Post by keithatengagedthinking » Wed Jan 16, 2008 4:13 am

Can you post an example of where you saw this or how you want to use it since the translation would depend on how it is used in the sense?

I found this in an old grammar book, so I'm not sure HOW relative it is in the 21st century, but it seems logical still:

p.271 - Italian Conversation-Grammar by Charles Marquard Sauer

"Tutto quanto, tutta quanta, pl. tutti quanti, tutte quante, means "all" or "altogether"' this pronoun is commonly absolute, though some examples may be found where it appears conjunctive; in gender and number it agrees with the substantive to which it belongs. Examples:

Ho visto tutti quanti.
I have seen them all. (I saw every single last one of them, no exceptions)

Le signore sono state derubate tutte quante.
All the ladies have been robbed. (all of the ladies with no exceptions)

Ha venduto tutte quante le valigie.
He sold all of the luggage. (and left nothing unsold)

Tutto quanto is more emphatic than tutto.


Please excuse the examples - they are old so I tried to modernize them so if I made an error in them, please correct them. Garzanti lists 'tutto quanto' as meaning 'everthing' or 'all' so it would depend on the context.

Could you also post where you saw 'tutto quanto giorno'? I couldn't find any examples online.

User avatar
Devery
Posts: 422
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:38 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Post by Devery » Wed Jan 16, 2008 4:34 am

These are nice examples, Keith. I can see it will take me a while to grasp this concept (I think too much :) ). I definitely would have constructed these sentences differently. As far as my example: "tutto quanto (il) giorno" is concerned, it is from Zucchero (of course!)
Ho bisogno d'amore per Dio, perche' se no sto male

ho bisogno d'amore per Dio, tutto quanto il giorno
Maybe he is saying "I'm in need of love for God's sake, each and every day!"

I don't know--something like that???

User avatar
polideuce
Posts: 876
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2007 3:29 pm
Location: Salsomaggiore Terme
Contact:

Post by polideuce » Wed Jan 16, 2008 7:24 am

"per tutto quanto il giorno" sta a significare "per l'intera durata del giorno".
Potrebbe essere appropriato tradurre "tutto quanto il giorno" con "whole day"...però non so se ha la medesima enfasi

User avatar
keithatengagedthinking
Posts: 1243
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 11:04 pm
Location: Rome, Italy
Contact:

Post by keithatengagedthinking » Wed Jan 16, 2008 12:41 pm

Devery wrote:These are nice examples, Keith. I can see it will take me a while to grasp this concept (I think too much :) ). I definitely would have constructed these sentences differently. As far as my example: "tutto quanto (il) giorno" is concerned, it is from Zucchero (of course!)
Ho bisogno d'amore per Dio, perche' se no sto male

ho bisogno d'amore per Dio, tutto quanto il giorno
Maybe he is saying "I'm in need of love for God's sake, each and every day!"

I don't know--something like that???
Each and every day sounds right because it is absolute and all inclusive.

Good to know where your example came from -- now it makes sense :)

User avatar
Devery
Posts: 422
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:38 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Post by Devery » Wed Jan 16, 2008 1:42 pm

Well, polideuce said that it is like saying "for the whole duration of the day." ("per l'intera durata del giorno")

I said "each and every day" for "tutto quanto il giorno."

Keith agrees, in a sense polideuce does not. Sto confondo!

Allora, I thought that "all day long/the whole day" was simply tutto il giorno. So if this is the case, does tutto quanto il giorno mean the same thing? Maybe with just a little more emphasis?

I hate to do this over a little expression, but this has bugged me for some time now!


Also, could I say "Mio figlio ha vomitato tutto quanto il giorno." (he did yesterday!) and, what is the difference (if any) between that and "Mio figlio ha vomitato tutto il giorno?"

User avatar
keithatengagedthinking
Posts: 1243
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 11:04 pm
Location: Rome, Italy
Contact:

Post by keithatengagedthinking » Wed Jan 16, 2008 2:27 pm

Hahaha...now you have confused me :? :? :?

User avatar
polideuce
Posts: 876
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2007 3:29 pm
Location: Salsomaggiore Terme
Contact:

Post by polideuce » Wed Jan 16, 2008 2:50 pm

la tua confusione potrebbe nascere dalla mia ignoranza...
"each day" non vuol dire "ogni giorno"? ed "every day" non è similare come espressione?
"ogni giorno" ha un significato diverso rispetto a "tutto quanto il giorno".
Ad esempio: se sto male lunedì, martedì, mercoledì, giovedì e via di seguito sino alla fine della settimana vuol dire che sono stato male "ogni giorno della settimana";
se sono stato male lunedì, e solo lunedì, da quando mi sono alzato a quando sono andato a dormire allora "sono stato male tutto il giorno" e se la cosa mi ha dato molti problemi allora dirò "sono stato male tutto quanto il giorno" per dire che durante la giornata non ho avuto un singolo momento di pausa.
Tornando a quello che dice Zucchero:
"tutto quanto il giorno" ovvero ogni singolo istante della giornata senza pause
Leggendo "each and every day" mi è parso che il significato diventasse "per ogni giorno"...

User avatar
keithatengagedthinking
Posts: 1243
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 11:04 pm
Location: Rome, Italy
Contact:

Post by keithatengagedthinking » Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:14 pm

Grazie, polideuce :)

Adesso capisco l'espressione. Grazie per la tua pazienza e spiegazione!!!

User avatar
Devery
Posts: 422
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:38 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Post by Devery » Wed Jan 16, 2008 5:20 pm

polideuce wrote:la tua confusione potrebbe nascere dalla mia ignoranza...
"each day" non vuol dire "ogni giorno"? ed "every day" non è similare come espressione?
"ogni giorno" ha un significato diverso rispetto a "tutto quanto il giorno".
Ad esempio: se sto male lunedì, martedì, mercoledì, giovedì e via di seguito sino alla fine della settimana vuol dire che sono stato male "ogni giorno della settimana";
se sono stato male lunedì, e solo lunedì, da quando mi sono alzato a quando sono andato a dormire allora "sono stato male tutto il giorno" e se la cosa mi ha dato molti problemi allora dirò "sono stato male tutto quanto il giorno" per dire che durante la giornata non ho avuto un singolo momento di pausa.
Tornando a quello che dice Zucchero:
"tutto quanto il giorno" ovvero ogni singolo istante della giornata senza pause
Leggendo "each and every day" mi è parso che il significato diventasse "per ogni giorno"...
Adesso ha senso, grazie per gli esempi.




Sorry Keith! :wink:

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests