cch

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VTBrandon
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cch

Post by VTBrandon » Wed Mar 05, 2008 11:49 pm

how is "cch" and "cc" pronounced in Italian?

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Netminder30
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Post by Netminder30 » Thu Mar 06, 2008 12:18 am

Brandon,

In Italian, C before a, o, u and before consonants has a sound similar to the English k. My understanding is that ch or cch always has this k sound regardless of the letter that follows it.

C (or cc) before e and i sound similar to the English ch as in chair.

dmj120
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Post by dmj120 » Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:19 am

Good explanation Steve 8) . That is my understanding as well.
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Roby
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Re: cch

Post by Roby » Thu Mar 06, 2008 2:31 am

VTBrandon wrote:how is "cch" and "cc" pronounced in Italian?
Brandon ... I have listed three words for each one with their meaning and pronunciations

cc words

jacket - giacca- jee-AH- kah
here is- ecco-EHk-koh
ice-ghiaccio- ghee-AH-chee-oh


Double consonants (i consonanti doppie) are pronounced much more forcefully than single consonants.with double b, c, d, g, p, and t, the stop is stronger than for the single consonant.

cch word

spades-pi'cche-pEE-keh (cards)
eye-occhio OH-key-oh
car- macchina-mAH--key-nah



Take a look at this link

http://home.unilang.org/main/wiki2/inde ... n_tutorial

Consonants that can have more than one sound

* c can have three different sounds

o sce, sci: preceded by s and followed by e, or i is ʃ, like sh in English she.
+ i is not pronounced if it is unstressed and followed by a vowel
# uscivano [uʃʃivano] (they were going out) the i is pronounced because it's alone
# sciava [ʃiava] (he was skying) the i is pronounced because it's stressed
# lasciare [laʃʃare] (to leave) the i is not pronounced. (even if the syllable it is in is the one stressed)
+ sci/sce should always be strengthened between vowels (ascia=[aʃʃa] (axe)), even across words boundaries: io scio (I ski)) [ioʃʃio].
+ In some regional pronounciation sc is not doubled between vowels.
+ Otherwise it is always weak, there is no ssc or scsc
o ce, ci: if c is followed by i/e (but not preceded by s), it is ʧ like ch in English chip.
+ the same observation on the 'i' made for sci holds
# cinese [ʧi'neze] (Chinese) i alone, pronounced
# farmacia [farma'ʧia] (apothecary) i pronounced because it is stressed
# facciamo [faʧʧamo] (we do) i is not pronounced
o strengthened value is cci /cce:
+ bracci (arms, not of a man), braci (?)
o c is otherwise (followed by anything that is not e or i) k
+ to have a [k] before e/i ch is used:
# [ke] or [kε]: che
# [ki]: chi
# [ske] or [skε]: sche
# [ski]: schi
o c strengtens to cc, ch to cch.
+ examples: fichi (figues), ficchi (you put into)
+ secare (to secate), seccare (to dry)

Check out this link as well:

http://impariamo.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2876

I hope this helps
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

dmj120
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Post by dmj120 » Thu Mar 06, 2008 3:10 pm

Excellent link Roby, thanks. :D
************************************
Family, dogs, bike, work ----- in that order.

Mr. Kawasaki gave us 12k rpm, its criminal not to use them :!: :P :mrgreen: :wink:

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Peter
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Post by Peter » Thu Mar 06, 2008 5:12 pm

I think it needs to be made clear that as with all double consonants both c's need to be pronounced, eg occhio = oc-key-oh.

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