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Doost
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 11:34 am

Ciao to All

Post by Doost » Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:01 pm

Ciao; :( :(
Hello everyone, I’m new to this site and to this group, My name is Doost, I’m an American, and I have been in Italy for more then a month now. I love the culture and I love the country but not knowing the language I feel like I’m in a jail. People are very kind but where I’m, hardly anyone speaks English and I only know a few Italian words. Does anyone else in this group have my situation?

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Peter
Posts: 2899
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 12:41 pm
Location: Horsham, West Sussex, England

Post by Peter » Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:20 pm

Ciao Doost and welcome

No doubt there will be someone who will be able to give you some guidance on how best to proceed. Obviously you can learn a lot here, but there are thousands of resources online that may be of help. It depends on your preferred method of learning of course, and no doubt evening classes are a non-starter. Many people swear by Michel Thomas, who devised a method of language learning that does not entail books, doing exercises, writing essays etc. But there are loads more things available, and of course advice from other members of the forum here.

Good luck. Whatever you decide on make sure it's fun, since that makes it easier to learn. :D :D

Roby
Posts: 3850
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:06 pm

Post by Roby » Tue Feb 24, 2009 11:42 pm

Welcome Doost....

Peter has given you great advice. Where exactly are you? Why are you in Italy... business? pleasure? other?

If you could let us know where you are, we could help you a bit further.

We are a very kind and helpful group. Welcome.
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

Doost
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 11:34 am

RE: Ciao

Post by Doost » Wed Feb 25, 2009 7:35 am

Thank you Peter, and thank you Roby for your warm greeting and your kind advices. You Italians should be so proud of your culture. You have a very rich culture, something that we as Americans are missing it. Life in here is definitely more relaxing, and more about family then a life back home, we as American are always in the fast lane, and we hardly have a time for family or enjoying life as you do.
I’m in a little town called Chivasso which is 25 kilometers to Turin, I’m here for my daughters, they are tennis players and they are trying to get on the professional tennis tour. Our coach is an Italian and he is excellent in what he is doing and that’s the main reason we are in Italy. If I knew the language I would have felt like I was in Hog Heaven being in Italy and surrounded by so many kind and generous people. But not knowing the language I feel like I’m lost a little bit.
I’m wondering if anyone in here is in Italy on Sport Visa or anyone knows about the Sport Visa and what is the best way to obtain it. I should have done this before I entered Italy but neither the coach nor I knew that we need to have a Sport Visa to be able to play on the Italian’s open series
Well, as the Italians say it. “Molto Piacere” from far away and till next time, Ciao

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isablu
Posts: 204
Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: Roma, Italia

Post by isablu » Wed Feb 25, 2009 9:33 am

Dear Doost, your words of appreciation for us Italians made me so happy and proud, so I thank you very much. I understand your situation is a bit awkward for the Visa and the problem with language. Anyway, I felt such an enthusiasm about our way of living and culture, that I'm sure you will find solutions quite soon. Indeed, I should say, I'm astonished that our life here in Italy can still appeal someone. I'm not disdaining our culture, which is undeniable and will remain in the centuries as "Italian culture and art", but at the moment I feel we Italian are going down, so down and so badly, that someone, who had known us in the past, hardly would recognize and appreciate all this today. So I'm surprised of your admiration and I would be very glad to discuss with you what have you seen here in Italy which struck you with respect to life or culture in USA. First, I know that in the North (where you are staying) life is a bit easier and more peaceful than here in Rome, then, may be you have been very lucky in meeting such a kind and generous people (among them, your coach). I don't want to spoil your vision, though, pardon me if I am too direct :roll: !
Da quanto tempo sei in Italia? That is the question you will be hearing so many times! How long have you been here in Italy? You can answer: sono qui da circa un mese. (mese= month) and so on.
I hope not to have bored you with my digressions and hope to share my opinions with you again.
Buon divertmento in Italia e tanta fourtuna alle tue figlie con il tennis!

isabella

PS. please don't hesitate to correct my English, I'd be very grateful for this.

Doost
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 11:34 am

RE: Ciao

Post by Doost » Wed Feb 25, 2009 3:50 pm

Dear Isabella;
Thank you for the respond and thank you for sharing your opinions. As they said, the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. I have travelled to a lot of countries and I know Europe and world is going through a rough time, Thanks to our banking system, as an American I’m ashamed to say, we really screw the world. No doubt due to downside economy you have noticed that your country is going down. Believe me regardless of our nationality we all feel the pain and we all think the good old days are over. I haven’t been to Rome yet and as you mentioned maybe it’s just the small city, simple living, the people and the small more family related community that has attracted me. In general sometimes we all losing the meaning of a real life, life is more about family, friendship and having time to enjoy it, then being about money, work, and the material things. Someone said this about mankind,,,,” we get bored with childhood. We rush to grow up and then long to be children again. we lose our health to make money and then lose our money to restore our health. By thinking anxiously about the future, we forget the present, such that we live in neither the present nor the future.” The above quote is the real reality of life in America’s fast lane of life, You won’t see store closing from 12:30 to 3:30 for fiesta and siesta, you are lucky if you get 15 minutes for lunch.
Anyhow, It is very nice to meet you in this group and I value everyone’s opinion , and regarding your English, believe me it’s superb. In America we have kids that graduate from collage and they still can’t write a sentence correctly.

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polideuce
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Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2007 3:29 pm
Location: Salsomaggiore Terme
Contact:

Post by polideuce » Wed Feb 25, 2009 8:24 pm

Dato che non so scrivere in inglese, spero che qualcuno te lo traduca :)

Benvenuto/a :)

Puoi trovare informazioni sul Visto qui:
http://www.esteri.it/visti/index_eng.asp
la pagina è in inglese e spero tu riesca a trovare tutte le informazioni di cui necessiti...se resti in Italia per meno di 90giorni comunque non necessiti di Visto
Questo è il sito del ministero degli esteri italiano:
http://www.esteri.it/MAE/EN/Home.htm?LANG=EN
e se serve questo è il sito dell'ambasciata statunitense in Italia:
http://italy.usembassy.gov/Main/ (ma non sono sicuro possa esserti d'aiuto).
Purtroppo oltre a fornire questi link non posso fare perché non ho informazioni riguardo ai visti...

ah! Può darsi che tu possa rivolgerti anche in Questura, oppure presso l'ufficio "relazioni col pubblico" del Comune dove risiedi, dove forse qualcuno che parla inglese lo trovi, e anche il locale comando dei Carabinieri potrebbe fornirti qualche informazioni...per il momento non mi viene in mente altro

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isablu
Posts: 204
Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: Roma, Italia

Post by isablu » Wed Feb 25, 2009 10:07 pm

Hello Doost, thank you for having explained your point so well and clearly. I must say I really agree with most of it. Here, from my 40 years age and from Rome suburb, I can say I understand what you meant, those small things so precious that seem to be lost for ever. Like having lunch with your parents and telling all the time about your fantasies. Taking your father's hand and run with him toward the school gates. Coming back home and scent the fragrance of a "ciambellone" your grandmother has just taken out of the oven. I'm sure these things have gone in most families in most cities in USA as in Italy. But, while in Italy you still can find villages, small towns (we call them "province" and we have also an adjective meaning "a bit narrow minded, pursuing antiquate ideas and biases" that is "provinciale") where life can be closer to those ideas and values of the past, may be in your country you have lost this long ago. To have a more complete overview on our life it may be useful for you to visit Milan too and Rome, of course. You will see so many beautiful monuments and forms of art and culture and this is exactly what dazzles tourists ans foreign people in general. But, since you have the opportunity to go beyond the surface and can observe also our customs and you can also read our newspaper and speak with natives, young people, workers, shopkeepers, you will find how poor (not of money) is becoming our life. Yes, economical crisis is increasingly striking us, but not enough and not as well as other countries. Not yet.. And don't be ashamed, please, don't; because we are able to ruin ourselves without the help of the others. Actually we succeeded in this, since our crisis started many years ago and far before American financial bubbles and so on. But this is a long and tremendously serious discourse. I'm sure we will go on next days. Now I can only wish a good night. Buona notte!
isabella

Roby
Posts: 3850
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:06 pm

Re: RE: Ciao

Post by Roby » Thu Feb 26, 2009 12:31 am

Doost wrote:Thank you Peter, and thank you Roby for your warm greeting and your kind advices. You Italians should be so proud of your culture. You have a very rich culture, something that we as Americans are missing it. Life in here is definitely more relaxing, and more about family then a life back home, we as American are always in the fast lane, and we hardly have a time for family or enjoying life as you do.
I’m in a little town called Chivasso which is 25 kilometers to Turin, I’m here for my daughters, they are tennis players and they are trying to get on the professional tennis tour. Our coach is an Italian and he is excellent in what he is doing and that’s the main reason we are in Italy. If I knew the language I would have felt like I was in Hog Heaven being in Italy and surrounded by so many kind and generous people. But not knowing the language I feel like I’m lost a little bit.
I’m wondering if anyone in here is in Italy on Sport Visa or anyone knows about the Sport Visa and what is the best way to obtain it. I should have done this before I entered Italy but neither the coach nor I knew that we need to have a Sport Visa to be able to play on the Italian’s open series
Well, as the Italians say it. “Molto Piacere” from far away and till next time, Ciao
Doost

You must contact the American Embassy in MILAN or call them to ask about the Sports Visa...
You need to ask about the P1 VISA.

This link is in Italian
http://italy.usembassy.gov/visa/vis/VIS-7-it.asp It talks about the P1 Visa -Sports Visa

Here is the website , address and telephone number to the Consulate in Milan

http://milan.usconsulate.gov/

Consulate General
of the United States
Via Principe Amedeo 2/10
20121 Milan, Italy
Tel. (+39) 02-290351
Fax (+39) 02-29001165

There is no need to dail the 39 within Italy . You must dail the 0 as in 02 290351.

http://italy.usembassy.gov/visa/default-it.asp

If you asked to come to the Consulate follow this security announcement.

Important Security Announcement

Please do not bring mobile phones or any electronic devices, such as Blackberries, iPods, or PDAs as they are not allowed within the Embassy or Consulates General. We also strongly advise that you do not bring strollers, large bags, such as backpacks, suitcases or packages to the interview as there are no storage facilities on the grounds of our facilities.

Only person(s) seeking consular services will be admitted into the Embassy or Consulates General. Exceptions will be made only if those seeking consular services are under 18, or if they are disabled and require assistance.

Applicants who do not follow these instructions will experience considerable delays at the security check point.

Go to your nearest bookstore in Turin and buy a Italian/English Phrasebook : Lonely Planet, and Barron's Italian at a Glance, Ask the person at the counter (cassa- checkout desk) to help you... Many of them speak English.

If we can help you further, let us know
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

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Dottore No
Posts: 146
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2008 8:42 pm
Location: Boston, Massachustetts, USA

Post by Dottore No » Thu Feb 26, 2009 5:56 am

Ciao a tutti...

I must say that this website is a most remarkable place! The people, the words, the languages, and the sincere thoughts and feelings that are exchanged here are truly outstanding. I have never felt closer to my ancestral heritage than I do now, as a member of this special community.

Invidio Doost e desidero che potessi essere nella sua situazione.
(I envy Doost and I wish that I could be in his situation).
Mi piaccerebbe molto a dovere a comunicare nell'italiano.
(It would please me greatly, to have to communicate in Italian).
Spero che lui non sprechi l'opportunita'
(I hope that he does not waste the opportunity)

I am a Michel Thomas disciple, but I have not followed the maestro's advice to NOT do homework or memorize things. It's too interesting and fun for me!

Benvenuto alla Bacheca

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polideuce
Posts: 876
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2007 3:29 pm
Location: Salsomaggiore Terme
Contact:

Re: RE: Ciao

Post by polideuce » Thu Feb 26, 2009 7:25 am

Roby wrote: This link is in Italian
http://italy.usembassy.gov/visa/vis/VIS-7-it.asp It talks about the P1 Visa -Sports Visa
ma c'è anche in inglese:
http://italy.usembassy.gov/visa/vis/VIS-7-en.asp
:)

Roby
Posts: 3850
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:06 pm

Re: RE: Ciao

Post by Roby » Thu Feb 26, 2009 3:17 pm

polideuce wrote:
Roby wrote: This link is in Italian
http://italy.usembassy.gov/visa/vis/VIS-7-it.asp It talks about the P1 Visa -Sports Visa
ma c'è anche in inglese:
http://italy.usembassy.gov/visa/vis/VIS-7-en.asp
:)
Grazie Gabriele.... Ero stanca ieri .... non lo vedevo... Grazie di tutto ...Sei una persona molto brava e molto utile... Grazie per tutto che fai sul forum...
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

Pompiere
Posts: 205
Joined: Thu Jul 17, 2008 4:47 am
Location: Garden City, New York

Post by Pompiere » Fri Feb 27, 2009 1:13 am

Ciao Doost:

Benvenuto alla bacheca, anchi'o nuovo qui. Forse otto mesi adesso, sono certo trovera' la gente qui molto simpatica e disponibile. In effetti tutti sono stato meraviglioso (wow I actually spelled meraviglioso correct, How did that happen??). Forse c'e' hope per me... :). Effettivamente, era ventisei mesi fa oggi, che ho cominciato a studiare italiano. Ma purtroppo e' stato un molto lungo ventisei mesi per mia moglie .... :):). Ma era lei che ha cominciato il mio questo viaggio (journey) a imparare l'itiano. A cute story for another time. Allora, e' meglio che finisco i l'iglese.

So 26 months, 2 college courses, alcuni adult education courses, two Italian clubs, 2 other classes associated with some local schools and I still have a hard time understanding a lot of things. But I am on a mission, and I will not be deterred from fulfilling my goal, to really get a handle on this beautiful language. It has become my passion and I am having a ball. If I finish some of the things around the house that need to be done, Carol (mia moglie) might have a little more enthusiasm for my passion ...:)

Well lots of luck with your daughters. What a wonderful experience for them and also for you to be able to witness their efforts while trying to make the tour. I wish you guys well once again and I am confident you will enjoy your new language. And please remember, the people* here can and will truly be a tremendous wealth of information for you.

* minus me

Richard
Last edited by Pompiere on Fri Feb 27, 2009 1:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

Pompiere
Posts: 205
Joined: Thu Jul 17, 2008 4:47 am
Location: Garden City, New York

Post by Pompiere » Fri Feb 27, 2009 1:23 am

isablu wrote: PS. please don't hesitate to correct my English, I'd be very grateful for this.
Isablu:

Scrivi molto, molto bene ... :)

You write wonderfully ...

Richard

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isablu
Posts: 204
Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: Roma, Italia

Post by isablu » Fri Feb 27, 2009 9:14 am

Scrivi molto, molto bene ...
grazie, Richard, è perchè amo l'inglese esattamente quanto amo l'italiano!

sono due lingue diverse, ma entrambe affascinanti e coinvolgenti. Conoscerle è amarle. E adesso una citazione per gli amanti del bel canto:

".....recondite armonie di bellezze diverse......"

a presto
isabella

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