L'oggi or Oggi?

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fatped
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Joined: Mon Aug 17, 2009 7:37 pm

L'oggi or Oggi?

Post by fatped » Mon Aug 17, 2009 7:47 pm

Salve tutti! È ha significato essere L'oggi o Oggi?

Come in “oggi è lunedì, diciassettesimo di agosto due mila e nove"


Just incase that didn't make sense, I tried to write the date today and I put Oggi é lunedi etc... but then when I checked in the translator, it says L'oggi?

Sono confuso

Anche che cosa può il prego significare?

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Peter
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Post by Peter » Mon Aug 17, 2009 9:23 pm

Ciao e benvenuto fatped

The definite article is not used when using oggi (today), domani (tomorrow) or ieri (yesterday).

Online translators are infamous - they are totally useless! :)

fatped
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Post by fatped » Tue Aug 18, 2009 12:09 am

haha grazie

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Devery
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Post by Devery » Tue Aug 18, 2009 1:53 am

Peter wrote:Ciao e benvenuto fatped

The definite article is not used when using oggi (today), domani (tomorrow) or ieri (yesterday).

Online translators are infamous - they are totally useless! :)
Including ourselves? :D

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Davide
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Post by Davide » Tue Aug 18, 2009 11:05 am

Completely agree with Peter - online translators are the devils plaything! A complete waste of time and very misleading, especially for beginners - and you have just come up against a prime example of where they give a completely incorrect 'translation' - avoid them like the plague. :evil:

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umberto
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Post by umberto » Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:45 pm

As Peter said, “today” is simply “oggi”: you don’t need any article. However you can add the articles with “oggi” and “domani” to use them as nouns:

Il domani sarà più luminoso dell’oggi (Tomorrow will be more dazzling than today)

This is just a poetical variation, not very used in everyday language. By the way, “ieri” can’t have any article: I’ve never heard “lo ieri”, in poetry either, but don’t ask me why of this awful and unfair discrimination because I have no idea!!! Anyway, your "l'oggi" is surely a mistake of the online translator...

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