mistakes in writing...

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stefano1982
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mistakes in writing...

Post by stefano1982 » Mon Aug 29, 2005 12:41 am

what are the most common mistakes english speaking people do while writing?i don't mean mispelled words,but real mistakes when you really don't know how you write a word.
Two mistakes i often notice when chatting to english/american people are "indIpendent"and recIeve...once someone corrected because I wrote recEIve but then i checked it out in my dictionary and I was right!
And this arouse my curiosity to know more:)
In italian the most common mistakes are like:
a without H when it's a verb(lui "a")and sometimes the contrary...a preposition becomes a HA...,another is e and è (conjunction-verb) ,or the wrong use of the condizionale(subj) like: se avrei...se sarei...se verrei....
this is really bad italian,don't do it!:)
ciao ciao
stefano

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Mindy
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Post by Mindy » Mon Aug 29, 2005 1:12 pm

Ciao Stefano!

You asked an interesting question. There are two errors that English speakers make when writing that I notice frequently, both of which drive me crazy. One pertains to the mis-use of the apostrophe. For example, just this morning I read on my cereal box: "Tips from the pro's". The apostrophe does NOT belong there!!! The second error that really bugs me is the mis-use of the word "myself". For example, I will frequently get e-mails at work that end with "If you have any questions, please contact Laura or myself." AAAAAACK! It should be "Laura or ME". That one really drives me nuts, because even the CEO and other high-level executives make this mistake regularly in both written AND spoken English.

Spelling is also a problem for a lot of English speakers, because unlike Italian, in English "what you see isn't always what you get". In fact, spelling is an important subject in school.

It is interesting to learn about the mistakes native Italian speakers make speaking their own language. One mistake I notice frequently is the mis-use of the subjunctive. For example, "Se avevo tempo andavo in vacanza" or "Se avevo tempo sarei andato in vacanza" instead of "Se avessi avuto tempo sarei andato in vacanza".

I'd love to hear others' opinions on this!

--Mindy

Thanatos
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Post by Thanatos » Mon Aug 29, 2005 1:41 pm

mi sento chiamato in causa :lol: . se non vi dispiace parlo italiano per comodità mia (ogni volta che devo scrivere in inglese mi viene il blocco :roll: )

Vi posso fare un breve resoconto degli errori che frequentemente vengono commessi dagli Italiani stessi:

'A me mi' è un errore gravissimo che non viene purtroppo mai corretto. Si dice 'a me' oppure 'mi'. Dire 'a me mi' è come 'a me a me'.

Stessa cosa vale per 'ma però'. Si dice o 'ma' o 'però'.

Un altro errore estremamente grave che dilaga tra gli Italiani è l'uso scorretto del condizionale e soprattutto del congiuntivo. Io non ho mai avuto di questi problemi grazie ai miei genitori, che mi hanno corretto fin dai primi anni, ma spesso sento fare tali errori, e danno veramente noia all'orecchio.

Ce ne sono molti altri, ma per ora mi vengono a mente solo questi. aggiungerò in caso ne ricordi altri :D

stefano1982
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Post by stefano1982 » Mon Aug 29, 2005 2:13 pm

Hello Mindy,
about the mis-use of "myself,I remember now how I am frequently answered when i ask:How are you?good,and yourself?"Is it correct in English?I was taught to answer like :"and you?"
Speaking of that,Italians often mis-use the pronoun TU changing it into the correspondent accusative even when it's not required:
"te che fai"instead of the right form "tu che fai",or "ci vai TE" instead of ci vai TU!(90% of Italians use the wrong form,especially in central and northern Italy)
In tuscany,especially in Florece,there is a wide use of the double pronoun(WRONG)...like: "se TU non ci vai TE",it sounds really funny,but the right form is "se non ci vai TU".
Ok,I don't remember other common mistakes right now,but I will post them in here as soon as I remember some!:)
ciao ciao a tutti...not HA tutti...hehe
stefano

TrentinaNE
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Post by TrentinaNE » Mon Aug 29, 2005 3:38 pm

I will frequently get e-mails at work that end with "If you have any questions, please contact Laura or myself." AAAAAACK! It should be "Laura or ME".

Even worse, in my book, is "Please contact Laura or I." :shock:

This morning on NPR I heard the alleged superintendent of the Red Lake school district in Minnesota say "I wouldn't wish it on no one." Double negatives may be correct in Italian ("Non ho parlato con nessuno", right?), but not in English.

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Artrella
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Post by Artrella » Mon Aug 29, 2005 3:47 pm

stefano1982 wrote:Hello Mindy,
about the mis-use of "myself,I remember now how I am frequently answered when i ask:How are you?good,and yourself?"Is it correct in English?I was taught to answer like :"and you?" >> It's not correct to say "and yourself" in English.

Speaking of that,Italians often mis-use the pronoun TU changing it into the correspondent accusative even when it's not required:
"te che fai"instead of the right form "tu che fai",or "ci vai TE" instead of ci vai TU!(90% of Italians use the wrong form,especially in central and northern Italy)
Boh! non sapevo questo sbaglio... è come lo spagnolo.. si deve dire "Tu che fai" "Tu non sai quello?"

In tuscany,especially in Florece,there is a wide use of the double pronoun(WRONG)...like: "se TU non ci vai TE",it sounds really funny,but the right form is "se non ci vai TU".

Ok,I don't remember other common mistakes right now,but I will post them in here as soon as I remember some!:)
Grazie Stefano per postare tutti questi sbagli perche per me che sto imparando l'italiano è veramente troppo aiuto!!!
“Chiunque può sbagliare: ma nessuno, se non è sciocco, persevera nell’errore”. (Cicerone)
Per favore, correggete i miei errori !

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jeffNotInphilly
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Post by jeffNotInphilly » Mon Aug 29, 2005 11:30 pm

english is very hard for everyone (me too!) concerning pronouns and certain verbs.

I always need to think twice regarding " and me" versus "and I"...enough people mix these up daily that it's hard to hear the right choice anymore

also certain verb forms: who here can be certain with past forms of "to lie" versus "to lay" !!!!

Sigh. i need to go back to high school again!

one last pet peeve: save the adverb..it's becoming an endangered species in american english! (quick-LY not quick!!)

ok, now I feel better! lol
I make many mistakes! Feel free to correct my italian!!

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disegno
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Post by disegno » Tue Aug 30, 2005 5:40 am

I think that most people misuse "I" and "me". It is incorrect to say "Dad and me went to the store". The correct version is "Dad and I went to the store". A quick way to test this is try the sentence without "Dad". It doesn't sound right to say "Me went to the store". It should be "I went to the store".

Also, people misuse "can" and "may". My mother made sure that we knew this. When we would say something like "Can I have another piece of cake." She would respond "I don't know CAN you"...as in are you physically able to eat another piece? The correct form should be "May I have another piece of cake."

In English people mix up "e" and "i". Here is a common rule of thumb "i" before "e" except after "c". This works for words like: perceive, receive, deceit, inconceivable where the "ei" follows the "c". Or where there is no "c" in words like: relieve, belief, irretrievable. But, beware, English is riddled with contradictions!

Secondo me, one of the most mispelled words is "tomorrow". Many times I see it spelled "tommorrow or tommorow"

TrentinaNE
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Post by TrentinaNE » Tue Aug 30, 2005 5:04 pm

I always need to think twice regarding " and me" versus "and I"...enough people mix these up daily that it's hard to hear the right choice anymore
I think many people were corrected as children about saying "and I" in the nominative case ("Mary and I went to the store" rather than "Me and Mary went to the store"), and because they weren't subsequently taught basic grammar, they assumed that "and I" is always correct, even in the objective case ("Dad drove Mary and me to the store" not "Dad drove Mary and I to the store"). As Melissa pointed out above, an easy way to check is to eliminate the "other person and" to see how the sentence sounds with just the pronoun. This rule of thumb tends to fall apart with the predicate nominative, however, as many folks don't recognize that "It could have been I" is correct while "It could have been me" is not.

Here's a quick explanation.

BTW, I've noticed that in Italian, it's more common to put the pronoun first, e.g., Io e Mary siamo andati al negozio. Is it considered incorrect to flip them (Mary ed io siamo andati) or less preferred?

stefano1982
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Post by stefano1982 » Tue Aug 30, 2005 6:06 pm

Cia trentina,it is correct to flip them,It just doesn't sound good since we tend to say "I and..."
Ciao ciao
stefano

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TeneroIppo
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Post by TeneroIppo » Tue Aug 30, 2005 8:01 pm

disegno wrote:I think that most people misuse "I" and "me". It is incorrect to say "Dad and me went to the store". The correct version is "Dad and I went to the store". A quick way to test this is try the sentence without "Dad". It doesn't sound right to say "Me went to the store". It should be "I went to the store".

Also, people misuse "can" and "may". My mother made sure that we knew this. When we would say something like "Can I have another piece of cake." She would respond "I don't know CAN you"...as in are you physically able to eat another piece? The correct form should be "May I have another piece of cake."

In English people mix up "e" and "i". Here is a common rule of thumb "i" before "e" except after "c". This works for words like: perceive, receive, deceit, inconceivable where the "ei" follows the "c". Or where there is no "c" in words like: relieve, belief, irretrievable. But, beware, English is riddled with contradictions!

Secondo me, one of the most mispelled words is "tomorrow". Many times I see it spelled "tommorrow or tommorow"
There's also another issue about I vs me that keeps puzzling me :)

you're taller then I or
you're taller than me ???

I have the impression that the former is correct but English speakers are used to saying "you're taller than me?"

what do you think about that?
che ne pensate?
Last edited by TeneroIppo on Tue Aug 30, 2005 8:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Ciao

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disegno
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Post by disegno » Tue Aug 30, 2005 8:43 pm

you're taller then I or
you're taller than me ???
Hai raggione, secondo me la prima è giusta. Ma dopo tanto tempo non suono bene nonostante che sia corretta. ':roll:'

Un'altra cosa sbagliata che gli americani dicono sempre: quando qualcuno chiede come va...'How are you?' La risposta di solito è...'I'm good'. La risposta giusta invece dovrebbe essere...'I am well'. Ma nella lingua comune, il secondo suona molto formale. Ciao, Melissa

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TeneroIppo
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Post by TeneroIppo » Tue Aug 30, 2005 9:03 pm

disegno wrote:
you're taller then I or
you're taller than me ???
Hai raggione, secondo me la prima è giusta. Ma dopo tanto tempo non suono bene nonostante che sia corretta. ':roll:'

Un'altra cosa sbagliata che gli americani dicono sempre: quando qualcuno chiede come va...'How are you?' La risposta di solito è...'I'm good'. La risposta giusta invece dovrebbe essere...'I am well'. Ma nella lingua comune, il secondo suona molto formale. Ciao, Melissa
molto interessante,
grazie disegno.
Ciao

stefano1982
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Post by stefano1982 » Wed Aug 31, 2005 2:02 pm

But the British tend to say "I'm fine",right?
stefano

TrentinaNE
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Post by TrentinaNE » Wed Aug 31, 2005 2:45 pm

you're taller then I or
you're taller than me ???
Hai raggione, secondo me la prima è giusta. Ma dopo tanto tempo non suono bene nonostante che sia corretta. ''


"You're taller than I" is correct -- it's a shortened form of "You're taller than I am", i.e. a predicate nominative. Lesson 137 at the web-link I provided a few posts back covers this topic. But this is a very common mistake in conversation, so much so that (as Melissa/disegno noted), the correct form tends to sound wrong or at least stilted. For example, if a phone caller asks for Elizabeth, I will respond "This is she," which is the correct form. But when I call my husband, I say "Hi, it's me," which is technically not correct, but is common in casual conversation.

Can you tell I spent several years diagramming sentences in Catholic school?? :wink:

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