ciao da una studentessa

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eliteglory
Posts: 17
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2008 7:35 am

ciao da una studentessa

Post by eliteglory » Tue Jan 25, 2011 12:46 am

Ciao,

Ho trovato questo sito mentre cercavo per un forum italiano, e ho tentato di fare l'account, ma sono gia` un membro di qualche anni fa.

Allora, sono una studentessa d'italiano in Arizona. Lo studio per quattro anni e mi sono innamorata con la lingua. Ho studiato in Italia per sette settimane, a Orvieto. Spero di ritornare presto per praticare il mio italiano parlato.

Ho bisogno d'aiuto perche` posso scrivere abbastanza bene (piu o meno) ma non sono brava quando parlo l'italiano. Dunque, cerco di scrivere qui senza il mio dizionario o i libri e scrivo come io parlo, con tutti gli errori che farei quando parlo! Mi aiutate, per favore :)

Amy

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coffeecup
Posts: 288
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Location: Australia

Post by coffeecup » Tue Jan 25, 2011 2:59 am

Ciao Amy, e benvenuta! :)

Anch'io sono una studentessa e sono innamorata con la lingua italiana! E per di piu', come te, posso scrivere piu' meglio che posso parlare.

What do you find hardest about speaking Italian, as compared to writing it?

I tend to find that verb conjugations slow me down a few moments, and also there are some cases where, in order to get something across, you have to completely change the word order to communicate effectively, and this rearranging of sentences makes me slow down to think, whereas in writing, you can take all the time in the world to put words on paper and the reader can read it without waiting for the next word, you know?

That was a really long sentence. Sorry! :roll:

a presto,
coffeecup
без тебя я не я. нас никогда не догонят! я тебя люблю.

eliteglory
Posts: 17
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2008 7:35 am

Post by eliteglory » Tue Jan 25, 2011 4:08 am

Ciao e grazie per la risposta!

I agree with you about why it can be harder to speak. I tend to overthink the grammar, along with pronunciation. It's actually kind of strange, because I can think in Italian pretty well and very quickly, but it comes out of my mouth all jumbled. And then if I'm speaking, and it's taking me a while to say what I want to say, I get self conscious and mess up even more.

Of course, some of those problems can only be fixed by speaking more, but hopefully writing without constantly checking wordreference.com will help me pick up some speed in getting things out.

(:

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-Luca-
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Post by -Luca- » Tue Jan 25, 2011 8:47 am

Ciao eliteglory! :)

Il tuo italiano sembra essere già buono, non devi fare altro che perfezionarlo nel corso del tempo..

:)
Italians don't know what Caesar salad is !!

eliteglory
Posts: 17
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2008 7:35 am

Post by eliteglory » Wed Jan 26, 2011 6:53 am

Ciao e grazie mille, Luca!

maelström

Post by maelström » Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:34 pm

eliteglory wrote:...but it comes out of my mouth all jumbled
I hope that you are aware that this is not a problem. Foreign learners are definitely too worried about errors; the fear of making mistakes shouldn't prevent you from speaking. Find an Italian friend - a patient one - willing to learn English, and speak with him/her via Skype, for example. At first, as someone said, don't be too respectful to the language you're learning: twist it, mistreat it, murder it. You are fully justified because you are at your early steps with it. You'll be able to make all the tiles go in the right place, with time and patience. Try to overcome the inevitable frustration of finding yourself unable to compose even the simplest sentence. It happens to every student of a foreign language. You should also try to spend some time in Italy. Even just a short stay will make you aware of the difference between standard Italian taught in textbooks (or spoken in movies) and the way people speak every day. Be warned: it might be disappointing :-)

Roby
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Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:06 pm

Re: ciao da una studentessa

Post by Roby » Wed Jan 26, 2011 4:06 pm

eliteglory wrote:Ciao,

Ho trovato questo sito mentre cercavo per un forum italiano, e ho tentato di fare l'account, ma sono gia` un membro di qualche anni fa.

Allora, sono una studentessa d'italiano in Arizona. Lo studio per quattro anni e mi sono innamorata con la lingua. Ho studiato in Italia per sette settimane, a Orvieto. Spero di ritornare presto per praticare il mio italiano parlato.

Ho bisogno d'aiuto perche` posso scrivere abbastanza bene (piu o meno) ma non sono brava quando parlo l'italiano. Dunque, cerco di scrivere qui senza il mio dizionario o i libri e scrivo come io parlo, con tutti gli errori che farei quando parlo! Mi aiutate, per favore :)

Amy
Benvenuta Amy!



You have gotten many great responses. Check out these sites as well. http://www.livemocha.com and http://www.sharetalk.com . Check into join a meetup group in your area. http://www.meetup.com.

Don't worry about making mistakes when you speak. We all learn by making mistakes. Over time and with practice you spoken Italian will get better. I too, write Italian well , but my spoken Italian is not at the same level. However, every day I practice and every day it gets better. I still make many mistakes when I speak. So Don't fret over it. Try not to mumble....Just say what come out whether it is wrong or right. A little laughter along with learning is what makes it easier to attempt to speak...
Most people do not care if you make mistakes. They are more concerned that you are trying . If you try , then often they too may try to speak English with you. They too have the same fears of making mistakes with English as we do with Italian so GO FOR IT and DON'T WORRY...
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

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stefano2
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Post by stefano2 » Thu Jan 27, 2011 10:19 am

Ciao Amy

Roby Share talk apears to be for sale or is your link wrong
Inglese più difettoso italiano difettoso

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Davide
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Post by Davide » Thu Jan 27, 2011 11:51 am

Hi Stefano - there was a 'd' missing from the url - here's the link:

http://www.sharedtalk.com/
:)
Skype: storebror2

Please identify yourself first before you add me.

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Davide
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Location: UK

Post by Davide » Thu Jan 27, 2011 11:55 am

maelström wrote:
eliteglory wrote:...but it comes out of my mouth all jumbled
I hope that you are aware that this is not a problem. Foreign learners are definitely too worried about errors; the fear of making mistakes shouldn't prevent you from speaking.
Absolutely. Think of it this way. How many people have you heard speaking your own language in a way a native never would - but those little mistakes don't prevent you from understanding them. Just go for it. The more you practise with native speakers, the easier it becomes and you start to realise just what a wonderful feeling it is to commmunicate in another language.

Another thing you might try is to start talking to yourself (well, I do this anyway!) Just start by describing what you're doing at that very moment - or think about how you might describe someone you know. The other really important thing (and often overlooked) is lots of listening practice - even if you don't understand everything.
Skype: storebror2

Please identify yourself first before you add me.

maelström

Post by maelström » Thu Jan 27, 2011 12:42 pm

Davide wrote:How many people have you heard speaking your own language in a way a native never would - but those little mistakes don't prevent you from understanding them
[...]
Another thing you might try is to start talking to yourself (well, I do this anyway!) Just start by describing what you're doing at that very moment
Exactly. People speaking a foreign language - thus not used to hear their own voice utter such "strange" words - should consider that native speakers are indeed used to hear their own language, so they usually are - and shall be - very lenient toward errors. Correcting foreign speakers, however, is not always easy for a native speaker: being too strict can frustrate and discourage beginners. A good compromise is required. At first one should correct only gross mistakes; then, with time and patience, help "polish" grammar and pronunciation, by rounding off little imperfections. I agree that talking to yourself is absolutely useful (and I do it all the time, in English). A good exercise is to describe everything you see around you, when walking a street for example: there's a bus, a lady with a dog, a red car, two friends talking, etc.. You will certainly miss some terms: note them down. You can look up them in your dictionary once at home. This is helpful because, in a foreign country, you often find yourself in unexpected situations (I don't think that anybody is seriously interested in knowing that "the cat is on the table") and you must be able to speak and make yourself understood the best way possible.

Roby
Posts: 3850
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:06 pm

Post by Roby » Thu Jan 27, 2011 2:52 pm

Davide wrote:Hi Stefano - there was a 'd' missing from the url - here's the link:

http://www.sharedtalk.com/
:)
Thanks Davide Appreciate it ...
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

Roby
Posts: 3850
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:06 pm

Post by Roby » Thu Jan 27, 2011 2:54 pm

Davide wrote:
maelström wrote:
eliteglory wrote:...but it comes out of my mouth all jumbled
I hope that you are aware that this is not a problem. Foreign learners are definitely too worried about errors; the fear of making mistakes shouldn't prevent you from speaking.
Absolutely. Think of it this way. How many people have you heard speaking your own language in a way a native never would - but those little mistakes don't prevent you from understanding them. Just go for it. The more you practise with native speakers, the easier it becomes and you start to realise just what a wonderful feeling it is to commmunicate in another language.

Another thing you might try is to start talking to yourself (well, I do this anyway!) Just start by describing what you're doing at that very moment - or think about how you might describe someone you know. The other really important thing (and often overlooked) is lots of listening practice - even if you don't understand everything.


Great points both of you
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

Roby
Posts: 3850
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:06 pm

Post by Roby » Thu Jan 27, 2011 2:56 pm

maelström wrote:
Davide wrote:How many people have you heard speaking your own language in a way a native never would - but those little mistakes don't prevent you from understanding them
[...]
Another thing you might try is to start talking to yourself (well, I do this anyway!) Just start by describing what you're doing at that very moment
Exactly. People speaking a foreign language - thus not used to hear their own voice utter such "strange" words - should consider that native speakers are indeed used to hear their own language, so they usually are - and shall be - very lenient toward errors. Correcting foreign speakers, however, is not always easy for a native speaker: being too strict can frustrate and discourage beginners. A good compromise is required. At first one should correct only gross mistakes; then, with time and patience, help "polish" grammar and pronunciation, by rounding off little imperfections. I agree that talking to yourself is absolutely useful (and I do it all the time, in English). A good exercise is to describe everything you see around you, when walking a street for example: there's a bus, a lady with a dog, a red car, two friends talking, etc.. You will certainly miss some terms: note them down. You can look up them in your dictionary once at home. This is helpful because, in a foreign country, you often find yourself in unexpected situations (I don't think that anybody is seriously interested in knowing that "the cat is on the table") and you must be able to speak and make yourself understood the best way possible.


Grest point!!
Roby
"Per raro che sia, il vero amore e' meno raro della vera amicizia."

"As rare as true love is, it is not as rare as true friendship."
- François de La Rochefoucauld

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