virgolette - << >> or "" ""

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zanger
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Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2011 6:25 am

virgolette - << >> or "" ""

Post by zanger » Sat Jul 23, 2011 6:33 am

When I read Italian, I see see quotes written two ways:
virgolette - << >>
doppi apici - "" ""

Which is better?

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coffeecup
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Location: Australia

Post by coffeecup » Mon Jul 25, 2011 4:13 am

not being a native speaker myself, I am not sure, but I love seeing the << >> ones. When I bought my first book in Italy (lol twilight da un autogrill quando siamo andate a cortina) I honestly thought there had been a printing malfunction, but when I realised, I began to love them. I love hand-writing them when I write plays and stories and work in Italian.

<< >> all the way! :D
без тебя я не я. нас никогда не догонят! я тебя люблю.

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umberto
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Post by umberto » Sun Sep 25, 2011 8:23 pm

I prefer «virgolette» too, though I don’t use them often because they aren’t on the keyboard. By the way, someone calls them caporali (corporals), because they remind the symbols (it’s “ranks” in English, isn’t it?) that military corporals have on their uniform. I’ve even heard someone call them “virgolette inglesi”, but I don’t know why… Were they invented in England?

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Peter
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Post by Peter » Mon Sep 26, 2011 6:14 pm

umberto wrote:I prefer «virgolette» too, though I don’t use them often because they aren’t on the keyboard. By the way, someone calls them caporali (corporals), because they remind the symbols (it’s “ranks” in English, isn’t it?) that military corporals have on their uniform. I’ve even heard someone call them “virgolette inglesi”, but I don’t know why… Were they invented in England?
No... ma perlomeno non ne ho sentito. Non usiamo <<virgolette>> in inglese; invece si trovano i doppi apici. :)

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umberto
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Post by umberto » Mon Sep 26, 2011 6:24 pm

Peter wrote:
umberto wrote:I prefer «virgolette» too, though I don’t use them often because they aren’t on the keyboard. By the way, someone calls them caporali (corporals), because they remind the symbols (it’s “ranks” in English, isn’t it?) that military corporals have on their uniform. I’ve even heard someone call them “virgolette inglesi”, but I don’t know why… Were they invented in England?
No... ma perlomeno non ne ho sentito. Non usiamo <<virgolette>> in inglese; invece si trovano i doppi apici. :)
Dalla punteggiatura inglese ho imparato l’uso dei dashes ( –). In Italiano i dashes (lineette) esistono, ma non si usano molto. A me piacciono e li trovo utili per isolare frasi all’interno di altre frasi.

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