Problems with 'ci'

Have a question about Italian grammar? Need a quick translation from Italian to English or vice versa? Post it here!
Post Reply
Michael Jordan
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun May 20, 2012 6:11 pm

Problems with 'ci'

Post by Michael Jordan » Tue Jun 05, 2012 10:49 am

Oh dear! I am still wresting with the different uses of 'ci' when used as a pronoun. I understand how, for example, 'ci sono!' translates to 'I've got it!' But I am truly lost on how an expression like 'ci ritorno', translates literally into 'we will be back' . How is 'ci' being applied in this phrase, if 'ci' means 'it''?

Michael

User avatar
Quintus
Posts: 421
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:22 am
Location: Florence, Italy

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Quintus » Tue Jun 05, 2012 1:44 pm

Michael Jordan wrote:Oh dear! I am still wresting with the different uses of 'ci' when used as a pronoun. I understand how, for example, 'ci sono!' translates to 'I've got it!' But I am truly lost on how an expression like 'ci ritorno', translates literally into 'we will be back' . How is 'ci' being applied in this phrase, if 'ci' means 'it''?
Michael
"ci" is not a pronoun in the sentences you reported. It is an adverb which means "here" (or "there"):
"Ci sei?" [Here are? => Are you here?]
"Ci sono" [Here am => I am here]

As you said, "ci sono!" may also have a figurative meaning, like "got it!", in the sense that "I am here with my head/mind", or "my mind succeeded in entering the virtual place that my attention was pointing to and in which I've found the solution now". Notice however that, in such a figurative sense, if you substitute "there" for "here", nothing changes in so far as there's no point in trying to establish if the virtual place containing the solution is "here" or "there".
In the same way, and in a more general sense, for example when the sense is proper, not figurative, "ci" may mean "here" as well as "there" depending upon the context.
If you ask me "ci sei?", "ci" will mean "here" if you are near me, eg into an adjacent room, but it will mean "there" if you are talking to me through a walkie-talkie. In the former case your "ci" is a "here" for me, because we are in the same flat, while in the latter case it's a "there", since we are in different places. But, again, trying to give "ci" one precise meaning is useless. The matter is subjective. We could be talking each other by a walkie-talkie while staying over the same mountain and, upon your call "Ci sei?", I could sense a "here" in your "ci", because we are finally over the same mountain (which is "here" for both of us) and when we'll have met our mission will be going to an end. Let's say that "ci" is a self-configuring adverb of place.

It might worth noting that we also say "Ci sono arrivato!" (I've arrived here/there!) in the sense of "I've got it!". The use of a verb like "arrivare" demonstrates that the speaker's mind had to walk on a more or less winding path before arriving to the solution/comprehension.

It is possible of course to use "qui" (here) and "là" (there) in place of "ci":
"Sei qui?" [Are here? => Are you here?]
"Sono qui" [Am here => I am here]
Though "ci" is extremely widespread. You can possibly hear "sei qui?" instead of "ci sei?", but the immediate reply will be almost always "ci sono", not "sono qui". "sono qui" would presume a situation of some importance, for example when you're going back home after various vicissitudes: "Sono qui, finalmente!"

"ci ritorno" means "here/there return" => "I (will) return here/there":
- "Ti è piaciuta la Scozia?" [Did you like Scotland?]
- "Moltissimo. Ci ritorno quest'estate" [Very much. There I return this summer => I'm going to go back there next summer]

--

"Ci" can be also a pronoun wich means "us/to us". It can't be used as a subject, it's always an indirect object, so it translates to "us", not "we":

"Ci dettero un po' di denaro" [ci (to us) dettero (they gave) un po' di denaro (some money) => They gave us some money]

"Ci colpirono duramente" [ci (us) colpirono (they hit) duramente (harshly) => They hit us harshly - colpire needs a direct object, hence "ci" = "us"]

"Ci parlarono duramente" [ci (to us) parlarono (they spoke) duramente (harshly) => They spoke to us harshly - parlare needs a indirect object, hence "ci" = "to us"]

--

"Ci" can also express reciprocity:
"Ci siamo incontrati ieri" [Ci (us = each other) siamo incontrati (met) ieri (yesterday) => We met yesterday]
"Ci parleremo l'anno prossimo" [Ci (to us = to each other) parleremo (we will talk) l'anno prossimo (the next year) => We will talk each other the next year]

--

"Ci", as well as other particles, may generate idiomatic expressions. For example:

- "Credo che il colpevole sia il maggiordomo"
- "Ci sta!"

This "Ci sta!" (here (it) stays!) is kind of a short expression for: "What you are saying (ie your hypothesis) stays well-fitted here (ie in the story we are dealing with)". So, in a word, "Ci sta" = "Agreed. It's absolutely possible!"

--

"Ci", as "us/to us", changes to "ce" before some pronominal particles:

"Quanti libri vi hanno dato?" [How many books did they give you?]
"Ce ne hanno dati cinque" [Ce (to us) ne (of them) hanno dati (they gave) cinque (five) => they gave us five of them]

But it doesn't change before the impersonal "si":
"Ci si vide d'inverno, un anno fa" [Ci (us=each other) si (untranslatable) vide (saw) in winter time, one year ago]

"Si vide" is an impersonal form, builded by means of an intermediate voice, one halfway between a passive and an active voice. Turning it into the active form, the sentence would translate like this: "We saw each other in winter time, one year ago".

I hope not having forgotten anything. In the case, I'll post an update. If you need more examples you have only to ask.

-

Michael Jordan
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun May 20, 2012 6:11 pm

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Michael Jordan » Tue Jun 05, 2012 4:02 pm

Thank you for this very thoughtful response, Quintus. Yes, my absent-minded mistake for referring to pronouns, since this is when ci is applied with its 'us' meaning. I don't have a problem with its use in the 'C'e' or 'Ci sono' context and I am comfortable using these. I can also now see from your explanation the literal interpretation of 'ci ritorno'.

But what of another context, for example 'ci vuole un'ora' per andare a . . . ' (where 'vuole' would equate in English to 'takes'). Is 'ci' actually being applied as an adverb, thus: '(there/here) it takes one hour to go to . . .' or as a pronoun, thus: 'it takes (for us) one hour to go to . . . '?

Is it just me, or is the use of 'ci' is one of the aspects of Italian grammar that is quite difficult for an English person to grasp in the different rules of its use.

Michael

User avatar
Quintus
Posts: 421
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:22 am
Location: Florence, Italy

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Quintus » Wed Jun 06, 2012 2:43 am

Michael Jordan wrote:...But what of another context, for example 'ci vuole un'ora' per andare a . . . ' (where 'vuole' would equate in English to 'takes'). Is 'ci' actually being applied as an adverb, thus: '(there/here) it takes one hour to go to . . .' or as a pronoun, thus: 'it takes (for us) one hour to go to . . . '?
Also in this case, "ci" is the adverb meaning "here", which is though to be interpreted a bit more extensively as "in this situation, in this circumstance". In the expression "ci vuole un'ora per andare a", which translates into "it takes one hour to go to", the presence of "ci" might be considered pretty pleonastic: "here it takes one hour to go to". Not really meaningful. With different expressions, you might find it more appropriate, eg. with "ci vorrebbe un cacciavite per...", "here (in this circumstance) one screwdriver would be needed to...". In any case the adverb "ci" is actually pretty pleonastic, but it can't be omitted because it's the expression "ci vuole" as a whole that is recognized in our language, the same way as "it takes" is recognized by native English speakers.

The use of the verb "volere" (to want) instead of "prendere" (to take) can be explained as follows. The subject of "vuole" is "it", which, if it wasn't always left out, would take the shape of "esso" in Italian, and its meaning is the very same as in English. "vuole" means "it wants", where "it" is the pronoun normally used in English to indicate that something impersonal is the subject which "rains", "takes", "reads" and so on. With this in mind, the sentence "ci vuole un'ora per andare a" could be elaborated like this:

"Here (in this circumstance) it wants (me, her, him us, them) to spend one hour to go to", where "it wants" could be read as a less peremptory form for "it demands/requires (me, her, him us, them) to spend one hour to go to".

One alternative, though similar, interpretation could be this:

"Here (in this circumstance) it wants one hour of (my, her, his, our, their) time to go to". And, in facts, it wants one
hour of my time and it takes it :).

The person which works as object of "it wants" is not explicitly expressed in the Italian sentence "ci vuole un'ora per
andare". Since it would have been impossible for me to render the sense of "it wants" in place of "it takes", I have had to use pronouns like "me, her, him us, them" as direct objects, but I enclosed them into a pair of brackets to indicate that they are absent in the Italian sentence.

Problems may arise when one needs to explicitly use a pronoun. For example, the translation of "it takes me one hour to go" is "mi ci vuole un'ora per andare". The English sentence uses a construction with the verb "to take" followed by a double direct object: "me" and "one hour". The Italian language does not have this construction. Hence it's quite difficult for me to explain the meaning of the leading "mi", and, at the same time, to preserve the use of "it wants" as in the example above.
In this case, "mi" means "to me": "mi (to me) ci (here) vuole (it wants) un'ora per andare a". These dative forms like "mi" (to me), "ti" (to you, singular), "gli" (to him), le "to her", ci (to us), vi (to you, plural), loro (to them) indicate the indirect object toward which the action expressed by the verb is directed. The verb "to want" expresses a will. So it could be said that "(the impersonal subject referred by) it wants one hour (of my time) and its will is directed towards me (to me)", which is not exactly the same as eg "it wants one hour from me" .
Don't know if this "mi" makes sense to you, but our language has plenty of these dative forms.

There are of course ways to render the original expression by which the sense is perfectly rendered but the construction is not:

- Possibly by "it takes one hour for me to go to", but "for me" is not a pure dative.

- "One hour is required to me to go to". In this case the use of the dative is possible but a passive form is needed for the verb.

If I'm not wrong, the English language too has a lot of dative forms. For example "Love's Been Good To Me". This "to me" is surprising. There's no way to render it exactly as it is if not changing "good" into "favourable": "l'Amore mi è stato favorevole", "Love to me (mi) has been (è stato) favourable". By this arrangement, one italian speaker like me would say that the sentence means "the favour of love has been directed toward me", hence "to me" is a pure dative case and the difference between this sentence and "to me it wants one hour" starts becoming very small, use of "it wants" apart (as to "good to me", we'd need to say "good with me").
Is it just me, or is the use of 'ci' is one of the aspects of Italian grammar that is quite difficult for an English person to grasp in the different rules of its use.
I agree. The so called pronominal particles, which at times can be also adverbs along with a totally different meaning, may be pretty challenging, expecially when they form clusters. In my opinion the best thing to do is trying to build an intermediate layer of comprehension. That was the method we used to translate from ancient Greek. The first time you face a text in ancient Greek you are in front of very, very odd things. But if you study the basic rules and read the text many times, the meaning will slowly start forming in your mind. At this point you are in the lowest layer of comprehension: you feel you are understanding the sense but you aren't still able to express it in your language, unless you use a lot of words and/or expressions that need to be very different from the original ones. But this way of proceeding is not part of the game. Instead, it's better to try and build an intermediate layer in which the grammar rules of your language can be broken if that serves the purpose to ease the rendering of the original expressions. This intermediate layer helps your comprehension and memory; it's the key to enter the world of the author of the text. And you know how to force your language to take some particular shape, because it's your native language. The highest layer is optional. It is needed only if you have to write a book or show your work to public. But imho, also in this case, giving up all of the original spirit in order to get the best form in your language is not always the best idea. Besides, Italian is not ancient Greek and, while we can't ask ancient Greeks anything more about their language, you can still find some Italians left alive, almeno finché Monti non ci aumenta ancora le tasse.

Franco

Dylan Thomas
Posts: 82
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2012 11:08 pm

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Dylan Thomas » Wed Jun 06, 2012 7:20 pm

Michael Jordan wrote:Thank you for this very thoughtful response, Quintus. Yes, my absent-minded mistake for referring to pronouns, since this is when ci is applied with its 'us' meaning. I don't have a problem with its use in the 'C'e' or 'Ci sono' context and I am comfortable using these. I can also now see from your explanation the literal interpretation of 'ci ritorno'.

But what of another context, for example 'ci vuole un'ora' per andare a . . . ' (where 'vuole' would equate in English to 'takes'). Is 'ci' actually being applied as an adverb, thus: '(there/here) it takes one hour to go to . . .' or as a pronoun, thus: 'it takes (for us) one hour to go to . . . '?

Is it just me, or is the use of 'ci' is one of the aspects of Italian grammar that is quite difficult for an English person to grasp in the different rules of its use.

Michael
In "Ci vuole un'ora per andare a...", "ci" is a pronoun (for us).
In "Ci vuole un'ora per andarci", the second "ci" is a particle, i.e. an adverb of place: "to go there".

It took me three hours to get home yesterday night. = Mi ci vollero / Mi ci sono volute tre ore per arrivare a casa ieri sera. ("ci" pronoun = me)
It took me three hours to get there / here... = Mi ci vollero / Mi ci sono volute tre ore per arrivarci / per arrivare là or qui... ("ci" adverb of place = there or here, depending on the position of the speaker).
It is not just you, Michael, I can assure you. In fact, it is a pretty complicated area of Italian grammar.
DT

User avatar
Quintus
Posts: 421
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:22 am
Location: Florence, Italy

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Quintus » Thu Jun 07, 2012 1:11 am

Dylan Thomas wrote:In "Ci vuole un'ora per andare a...", "ci" is a pronoun (for us).
In "Ci vuole un'ora per andarci", the second "ci" is a particle, i.e. an adverb of place: "to go there".
It took me three hours to get home yesterday night. = Mi ci vollero / Mi ci sono volute tre ore per arrivare a casa ieri sera. ("ci" pronoun = me)
DT
Sorry. Your explanation of "ci vuole" is a personal interpretation and as such is wrong. "ci vuole" is a impersonal form since we use it both for the first plural and singular person, in which case it can be optionally placed after the pronoun "mi". Hence "ci", in "ci vuole", does not mean "to/for us" nor "to/for me" nor anything like that. As I said, it's an adverb. When things aren't easy or/and clear it would be better to consult a dictionary, which I always do before posting my answers.

« Il dizionario della lingua italiana » - G. Devoto, G.C. Oli - Casa Editrice Felice Le Monnier S.p.A., Firenze

ci avv. e pron.
1. avv. 'Qui, in questo luogo; lì, in quel luogo': sia in posizione enclitica (andarci, andar lì, là, costì, costà), sia in posizione proclitica (ci sto bene, qui, in questo luogo sto bene); ci andrò domani, là, in quel posto, andrò domani); spesso con funzione rafforzativa del verbo: ci siamo (siamo arrivati), c'era una volta (esisteva una volta), ci vuole (occorre), ci corre (è diverso).

[ci adverb and pronoun.
1. Adverb 'Here, in/to this place; there, in/to that place': both in enclitic (to go there) and proclitic position (here I am well, here, I am well in this place); there I will go tomorrow, there, to that place); often as an intensifier of the verb: we are here (we have arrived), once upon a time (it existed upon a time), it takes (it is needed), there's no
comparison (it's different)]



2. Pronome personale di prima persona plurale al caso dativo (ci sembra, sembra a noi) o accusativo (ci chiama, chiama noi); indispensabile nella formazione dei verbi riflessivi e medi (ci vestivamo; ce ne andiamo; ci annoieremo a morte) || Come pronome dimostrativo riferito a cosa; equivale a 'ciò' preceduto da preposizione; quindi 'di ciò' (ci ho gusto), 'a ciò' (non ci credo), 'in ciò' (non ci capisco nulla).

[Personal pronoun of first plural person in the dative (it seems to us) or accusative case (s/he/it calls us); it is essential in the formation of reflexive and middle diathesis verbs (we got dressed; we are going away from here; we'll be bored to death) || As a demonstrative pronoun referred to something; it is equivalent to 'that' preceded by a preposition; hence 'of that', 'to that' (I don't believe to that), 'in that' (I understand nothing in that)]



3. Come particella, nella sua duplice funzione avverbiale e pronominale, può unirsi ad altre particelle, sia precedendole, come nel caso di si, se ne (ci si mette anche lui; ci se ne lava le mani) e di lo, la, li, le, ne, in tal caso assumendo la forma di ce (ce l'ha detto lui, ce li ha dati la mamma, ce le sonò di santa ragione, ce n'andammo) sia posponendosi a esse, come nel caso di mi, ti, gli (mi ci metto anch'io, ti ci vorrebbe un aiuto; gli ci vorrebbe un po' di fortuna) || Unita a ecco e ai verbi di modo infinito ha sempre posizione enclitica (eccoci qua; sentirci, vederci; avendoci, ecc.). [Lat. (*hi)cce da hic].

--

http://www.zanichellibenvenuti.it/wordp ... ment-12115

Regards,
Quintus

Dylan Thomas
Posts: 82
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2012 11:08 pm

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Dylan Thomas » Fri Jun 08, 2012 9:07 pm

My explanation of “ci vuole” was not a personal interpretation. Actually, it was a very bad and confusing explanation. There must have been some misunderstanding, Quintus, and I admit it’s my fault.
When I wrote

In “Ci vuole un’ora per andare a…”, “ci” is a pronoun (for us)
Mi ci vollero / Mi ci sono volute tre ore per arrivare a casa ieri sera. (“ci” pronoun = me)

I was thinking of the English sentences (It took us an hour to get there; It took me three hours to get home yesterday night), where “ci” is translated into a personal pronoun.

Let’s see if I can be a bit clearer now.
“Volerci” is a pro-complement verb (verbo procomplementare), i.e. a verb which, by adding the clitic “ci”, has developed new meanings (essere necessario, occorrere), quite different from the original ones (desiderare, richiedere, pretendere etc). The “ci” is here called “ci attualizzante” and has nothing to do with the original adverb of place having lost its locative value (ci vado = vado là). Also, I don’t think “volerci” is an impersonal verb.

Mi ci vorrebbe un’ora per andarci.

un’ora = subject
mi = indirect object (pronoun)
ci = “particella attualizzante”
vorrebbe = verb
per andare = final clause (preposition + infinitive)

This is what I know about “volerci”. I’d like to add something, though. I believe everybody has the right to disagree with any post provided of course that they are not downright rude.
I don’t think I need to look in a dictionary to get information about which I feel pretty sure. I underline it was my fault. But I was not unfair. (See, “As I said, it's an adverb. When things aren't easy or/and clear it would be better to consult a dictionary, which I always do before posting my answers.”)

By the way, Quintus, did you realize that point 3 of the source you quoted is also about pro-complement verbs?

DT

User avatar
Quintus
Posts: 421
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:22 am
Location: Florence, Italy

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Quintus » Mon Jun 11, 2012 1:11 am

Senza voler essere scortese, non mi pare che l'analisi grammaticale della frase "mi ci vorrebbe un'ora per andarci" aggiunga qualcosa di nuovo all'argomento in esame. Infatti, dal momento che trattiamo di un avverbio, si capisce che la sua funzione, tanto in italiano quanto in inglese, è quella di modificare il valore di un verbo. Allo stesso modo, poi, mi sembra che la terminologìa introdotta costituisca un inutile appesantimento. Inoltre il termine "particella" non accompagnato da nessuna specificazione di tipo (l'aggettivo attualizzante non qualifica un tipo grammaticale) potrebbe far sospettare che esista un terzo tipo di clitico oltre ai due generalmente conosciuti qui come "adverb" e "pronominal particle" o semplicemente "pronoun". Comunque, volendo conservare la terminologìa del Sabatini, che mi sembra tu stia seguendo, potrebbe essere forse preferibile chiamarla "particella avverbiale attualizzante", salvo però poi dover spiegare il significato del termine e in che cosa esso si distingua da quello di avverbio. Compito non facile, secondo me, trattandosi più che altro di una gradazione.

Devo anche ammettere, sinceramente, che non ho capito il motivo della tua domanda conclusiva « By the way, Quintus, did you realize that point 3 of the source you quoted is also about pro-complement verbs? » Se è per questo, anche la maggior parte dei verbi del punto 1 sono classificati nelle grammatiche come verbi procomplementari. Il fatto è che non vedo come ciò possa essere direttamente impiegato ai fini di una spiegazione sul "ci" a una persona di lingua inglese. Porre "ci vuole" = "it takes" è certo corretto ma nulla svela sul significato del "ci".

Aggiungo perciò solo qualche nota. La suddivione proposta dal Devoto-Oli è, a mio parere, perfetta non solo for all practical purposes ma anche da un punto di vista teorico, considerando ovviamente che si tratta delle definizioni succinte di un dizionario. Infatti, in alcuni lavori recenti (2000-2010) e in particolare nel seguente

Italian clitics: An empirical study by Cinzia Russi - Aski, Janice M. - The Ohio State University
http://www.degruyter.com/dg/viewarticle ... 26D3C0551A

viene seguito uno schema analitico di tipo V + Cl + (XP) dove V = verb, Cl = clitic, (XP) = additional element. Ecco alcuni esempi che ho rielaborato conformemente allo spirito della trattazione della Russi. Li ho suddivisi in due categorìe numerate, volutamente, come 1 e 3.

1. One-clitic, pro-complement verbs

"farci caso" = fare (verb) + ci (Cl = locative clitic) + caso ((Xp) = noun without article)
Example: non ci ho fatto caso, I did not notice it

"volerci" = volere (verb) + ci (Cl = locative clitic)
Example: ci vuole un'ora, it takes one hour

3. Two-clitics, pro-complement verbs

"mettercela tutta" = mettere (verb) + ce (Cl = locative clitic) + la (Cl = direct object pronoun, feminine - it would equate in English to "it") + tutta ((Xp) = adjective, feminine singular, referred to and in agreement with "la")
Example: ce l'ho messa tutta, I went hard at it

"farcela" = fare (verb) + ce (Cl = locative clitic) + la (Cl = direct object pronoun, feminine - it would equate in English to "it")
Example: ce l'ho fatta!, I made it!

Altri esempi:
Se ci fai caso, nessuno ne parla, If you notice, nobody talks about it
Mi ce ne è (n'è) voluto molto di più!, It took me way more than that!
Se non ce la metterete tutta sarete sconfitti, If you will not go hard at it, you will be defeated
Ha provato ad attraversare il fiume a nuoto ma non ce l'ha fatta, He tried to swim across the river but didn't made it

Nella sua opera la Russi esamina anche verbi con clitici cosiddetti inerenti come "finirla", "spararle grosse", etc., che non interessano qui.

Ho raggruppato i verbi nelle categorìe 1 e 3 perché corrispondono proprio alle categorie 1 e 3 del Devoto-Oli. Visto che la Russi non ha operato nessuna suddivisione, perché invece il Devoto-Oli l'ha fatto? Il perché è, secondo me, evidente: la Russi usa ovunque e sistematicamente l'aggettivo "locativo" per il clitici "ci" e "ce", con questo intendendo che essi collocano in un luogo (o spostano su un piano), non necessariamente fisico, l'azione del verbo, ma poiché solo alcuni verbi usano "ci" come clitico unico, il Devoto-Oli ha inteso raggrupparli perché in quelli la funzione avverbiale del "ci" spicca con maggiore evidenza. Sempre il Devoto-Oli descrive il "ci" della categorìa 1 come « avverbio con funzione rafforzativa del verbo » (ie volerci e correrci) che io ho tradotto nel mio messaggio precedente con "intensifier" (often as an intensifier of the verb); infatti, secondo il mio dizionario Hazon, elemento rafforzativo si traduce con intensifier.

Vorrei mettere in guardia i lettori di questo mio scritto che la parte summenzionata dell'opera della Russi non è che la
punta dell'iceberg. Per quanto si possa considerare interessante il fatto che in tale opera « She adopts the assumptions of the functionalist (cognitive) framework of linguistic anlysis (employed by researchers such as Charles Filmore, George Lakoff, [et al.]), which identifies grammar with conceptualization and accept that the conceptualization and representation of laguage structure are no different from the same processes applied to other conceptual structures. As a result, Russi's analysis is data driven », va considerato che ricerche di questo tipo si propongono di creare strutture concettuali generali, dove i dati da analizzare sono ricavati da testi specialistici (the data on twentieth-century Italian is drawn from CORIS/CODIS, etc.). Comunque vedete un po' voi.

Quanto ho, forse troppo succintamente, fin qui esposto mette secondo me d'accordo vari autori, quali, appunto, il Sabatini, il Devoto-Oli, la Russo e il Serianni. Resterebbe se mai da stabilire in quale misura il clitico "ci" effettui l'attualizzazione, o intensificazione o azione localizzante che dir si voglia, del verbo "volere". Ma questa ricerca, per dirla chiaramente, non mi interessa, così come considero un appesantimento questo tipo di terminologìa, come ho già detto all'inizio. Ci tengo a precisare che non è che considero queste parole vuote di significato. Anzi, in ambito accademico esse ne sono senz'altro piene e servono a snellire i procedimenti favorendo la comunicazione concettuale. Tuttavia questi procedimenti si muovono in direzione diversa, se non opposta, alla direzione che io considero quella necessaria per tentare di rispondere a chi viene nel forum in cerca di spiegazioni.

Siccome questa mia nota non contiene molto di più che precisazioni, una volta arrivati a questo punto potremmo dire di trovarci finalmente sulla linea di partenza per il viaggio alla ricerca del significato del "ci", viaggio che non potrebbe essere diverso da quello attraverso l'etimologìa.

Quintus

Pacentro08
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 11:11 pm
Location: Cornwall, UK and Abruzzo, Italy

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Pacentro08 » Mon Jun 11, 2012 11:50 pm

All you will ever want to know about pronouns is in this:

Ciro Massimo Naddeo, I pronomi italiani published by Alma edizioni. All in Italian, but the clearest explanations I've ever come across, plus exercises (with solutions) and games.

I'm currently planning my UK workshops for 2012/13 and pronouns will be the subject of one of them. Make a pitch for me doing one in your area?? :D :D

Salutoni
http://www.susangirellihill.eu
Italian and English language services
Find me on Facebook: Susan Girelli Hill
Tweet me @SGirelliHill
Linkedin: Susan Girelli Hill

Dylan Thomas
Posts: 82
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2012 11:08 pm

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Dylan Thomas » Tue Jun 12, 2012 5:16 pm

Quintus, la tua risposta impressiona per consistenza, ma noi stiamo discutendo del verbo “volerci”, ed io mi limito a questo.

[“Non mi pare che l'analisi grammaticale della frase "mi ci vorrebbe un'ora per andarci" aggiunga qualcosa di nuovo all'argomento in esame. Infatti, dal momento che trattiamo di un avverbio, si capisce che la sua funzione, tanto in italiano quanto in inglese, è quella di modificare il valore di un verbo.”]

La aggiunge, invece. “Ci vuole” non è una forma impersonale (come sostieni tu qui sotto) dato che “volerci” è un verbo procomplementare. I verbi impersonali sono tutt’altra cosa.

["Ci vuole" is an impersonal form since we use it both for the first plural and singular person, in which case it can be optionally placed after the pronoun "mi". Hence "ci", in "ci vuole", does not mean "to/for us" nor "to/for me" nor anything like that. As I said, it's an adverb.]

Il clitico “ci” è sì l’originario avverbio di luogo ma totalmente privo di valore locativo.
Tanto per fare un esempio: “farcela” è un verbo procomplementare contenente due clitici, “ci” e “la”. La combinazione ci permette di ottenere una forma verbale più espressiva (che spesso si allontana di molto dal valore semantico del verbo di partenza). Quindi quel “ci” non è più avverbio di luogo, o meglio non è ha più il valore.

[Alla domanda di Michael Jordan, “...But what of another context, for example 'ci vuole un'ora' per andare a . . . ' (where 'vuole' would equate in English to 'takes'). Is 'ci' actually being applied as an adverb, thus: '(there/here) it takes one hour to go to . . .' or as a pronoun, thus: 'it takes (for us) one hour to go to . . . '?” hai risposto, “Also in this case, "ci" is the adverb meaning "here", which is though to be interpreted a bit more extensively as "in this situation, in this circumstance".]

Sbagliando, secondo me. Quel “ci” non ha più valore di avverbio di luogo perché, ribadisco, “volerci” è un verbo procomplementare. Di conseguenza non può neppure essere interpretato come fai tu perché la particella “ci” si è grammaticalizzata e, quindi, desemantizzata. Non la puoi più scorporare dal verbo e prenderla singolarmente perché non può più essere analizzata su un piano puramente semantico.

[Devo anche ammettere, sinceramente, che non ho capito il motivo della tua domanda conclusiva « By the way, Quintus, did you realize that point 3 of the source you quoted is also about pro-complement verbs? » Se è per questo, anche la maggior parte dei verbi del punto 1 sono classificati nelle grammatiche come verbi procomplementari. Il fatto è che non vedo come ciò possa essere direttamente impiegato ai fini di una spiegazione sul "ci" a una persona di lingua inglese. Porre "ci vuole" = "it takes" è certo corretto ma nulla svela sul significato del "ci".]

E’ vero, anche nel punto 1 ci sono alcuni verbi procomplementari. Ma questo non cambia la sostanza del discorso. Con la mia domanda finale volevo semplicemente dire che sarebbe bastato riconoscere in “volerci” un verbo procomplementare (e il valore che assume il clitico “ci” in questi verbi) e avremmo evitato questa lunga discussione.

Francamente, non so quanto recente sia la nuova etichetta terminologica “verbi procomplementari”. So per certo che in precedenza questa tipologia verbale era catalogata, più genericamente, entro la categoria dei verbi pronominali. E non appesantisce il discorso, distingue semmai due categorie verbali ora considerate completamente diverse.

Infine, per quanto riguarda lo studio condotto da Russi e Aski, che non conosco, bisognerebbe capire perché le due studiose chiamino “clitico locativo” quel famigerato “ci”, se da qualche parte spieghino che oramai viene definito “ci attualizzante”, se ritengano che sia solo una questione di terminologia, se con “clitico locativo” intendano il vero e proprio avverbio di luogo (ma ne dubito), ecc.

Trovo la nostra discussione affascinante, Quintus, al di là di qualche screzio insignificante, due “inesperti” (io sicuramente lo sono) che amano la lingua italiana e mandano in fumo i cervelli per ragionarci sopra. E’ molto bello. Ma non credo di riuscire ad andare oltre (è anche periodo d’esami per me).
Comunque spero a presto e tante belle cose.
DT

ellowen.deeowen
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2012 1:54 am

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by ellowen.deeowen » Fri Jun 15, 2012 11:29 pm

Ciao a tutti.
Non ho mai capito perché si consideri "ci", nel suo significato locativo, un avverbio. In molte grammatiche, insieme a "ne", rientra nella categoria delle particelle pronominali, che è in fondo, come suggerisce il nome stesso, una sottocategoria dei pronomi. E infatti dei pronomi ha tutte le caratteristiche. Anzitutto la funzione di coesione testuale, per cui si riferisce a un elemento del testo precedente (anafora) o successivo (catafora). Voglio dire che "ci" non significa solo "qui" o "lì; può significare di tutto e di più, a seconda dell'elemento che sostituisce (come accade con gli altri pronomi: la, gli ecc.).
Se io dico "Vado là" e indico con la mano, l'avverbio deittico "là" basta da solo a chiarire il luogo cui ci si riferisce; se invece dico "ci vado", non posso conoscere la natura di questo luogo a meno di non andare a cercare il riferimento preciso nel testo adiacente (generalmente precedente), quindi "ci" può equivalere a qualsiasi cosa, da "a Roma", "lassù", "qui", fino a "a quel bellissimo concerto di musica classica".
Altra caratteristica dei pronomi che "ci" condivide è la posizione che assume rispetto al verbo, proclitica (cioè precede un verbo finito: "ci sono andato") o enclitica (segue un verbo non finito: tornarci), cosa che un avverbio non può fare in alcun modo.
Altra prova del fatto che "ci" è un pronome è che compare nei cosiddetti "verbi pronominali", ovvero quei verbi con pronomi di cui fanno parte i vari "esserci", "farcela", "metterci", "volerci" e svariati altri. In questi verbi è difficile classificare con certezza i singoli elementi pronominali, perché i riferimenti testuali dell'espressione originale si sono persi col passare del tempo, e infatti vengono trattati un po' come i phrasal verb dell'inglese: l'aggiunta del pronome modifica (a volte di molto) il significato del verbo. Per cui se aggiungiamo "ci" a "volere", non esprimiamo più una volontà ma finiamo per produrre un verbo dal significato totalmente nuovo, che equivale a "essere necessario", "occorrere".
Inoltre, "volerci" non è affatto un verbo impersonale; questi ultimi sono verbi come "piovere", dove non è riscontrabile un soggetto grammaticale. Al contrario, in una frase come "Mi ci vogliono almeno due ore per tornare a casa", il soggetto è chiaramente "due ore", come confermato dalla concordanza al plurale del verbo pronominale "volerci". Parafrasando: "due ore sono necessarie a me per tornare a casa"
Spero di essere stato d'aiuto :)
Ciao!

User avatar
Quintus
Posts: 421
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:22 am
Location: Florence, Italy

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Quintus » Sat Jun 16, 2012 11:12 pm

Dylan Thomas wrote:Quintus, la tua risposta impressiona per consistenza, ma noi stiamo discutendo del verbo “volerci”, ed io mi limito a questo.
Have I been speaking so far about something else? I dragged in the verbs of section #3 because it looked like you wanted me to take them into consideration: «By the way, Quintus, did you realize that point 3 of the source you quoted is also about pro-complement verbs?»
[“Non mi pare che l'analisi grammaticale della frase "mi ci vorrebbe un'ora per andarci" aggiunga qualcosa di nuovo all'argomento in esame. Infatti, dal momento che trattiamo di un avverbio, si capisce che la sua funzione, tanto in italiano quanto in inglese, è quella di modificare il valore di un verbo.”]

La aggiunge, invece. “Ci vuole” non è una forma impersonale (come sostieni tu qui sotto) dato che “volerci” è un verbo procomplementare. I verbi impersonali sono tutt’altra cosa.

["Ci vuole" is an impersonal form since we use it both for the first plural and singular person, in which case it can be optionally placed after the pronoun "mi". Hence "ci", in "ci vuole", does not mean "to/for us" nor "to/for me" nor anything like that. As I said, it's an adverb.]
I respect your opinion, but obviously I'm keeping mine. Not only because all of my grammatical references (I could post a lot of links) define "volerci" as a typical impersonal construction, but also because such a construction is identical to the construction we call "si passivante". A. L. Lepschy and G. Lepschy call it "passive si". This construction applies to the third person singular and plural of simple-tense, transitive active verbs with the agent not expressed and the grammatical subject expressed.

Here's one example about "passive si" with the verb "to see":

Si vede una macchina - 3rd person singular of a transitive active verb with no expressed agent. The expressed subject is macchina. [We see one car, one car is seen by us]

Si vedono due macchine - 3rd person plural of a transitive active verb with no expressed agent. The expressed subject is macchine. [We see two cars, two cars are seen by us]

For the sake of clarity, the form of these impersonal constructions is not truly passive nor active. If you ask an Italian what does s/he mean with "si vede una macchina", sh/e answers "I mean we see one car, or one car is
seen by us". In other words, when sh/e is requested to explain the meaning of the expression s/he can't help to resolve for the active or passive form. That's the reason why I used the agent for the passive form in English, although not expressed in Italian.

Here's one example about "volerci":

Ci vuole una macchina - 3rd person singular with no expressed agent. The expressed subject is macchina. [We need one car, one car is needed by us]

Ci vogliono due macchine - 3rd person singular with no expressed agent. The expressed subject is macchine. [We need one car, one car is needed by us]

The other persons, which aren't admitted for a "si passivante" construction, can be used for "volerci" only provided that one additional clitic is used, eg "vi ci vuole la macchina", "gli ci vuole la macchina" and so on.

You said: «I verbi impersonali sono tutt’altra cosa». Really? Are they quite a different thing, Thomas? I know quite well what impersonal verbs are. It would be kind of you to always specify that your statements are an opinion of yours, which could be achieved by "imo" or "imho". The set of Italian impersonal verbs is large. It's made up of a number of subsets. You may want to have a look to this article several pages long:

http://www.dizionario-italiano.it/gramm ... ca-137.php
Il clitico “ci” è sì l’originario avverbio di luogo ma totalmente privo di valore locativo.
Tanto per fare un esempio: “farcela” è un verbo procomplementare contenente due clitici, “ci” e “la”. La combinazione ci permette di ottenere una forma verbale più espressiva (che spesso si allontana di molto dal valore semantico del verbo di partenza). Quindi quel “ci” non è più avverbio di luogo, o meglio non è ha più il valore.
I took note of your opinion and of course don't agree about such a lack of a locative value in the adverb "ci".
[Alla domanda di Michael Jordan, “...But what of another context, for example 'ci vuole un'ora' per andare a . . . ' (where 'vuole' would equate in English to 'takes'). Is 'ci' actually being applied as an adverb, thus: '(there/here) it takes one hour to go to . . .' or as a pronoun, thus: 'it takes (for us) one hour to go to . . . '?” hai risposto, “Also in this case, "ci" is the adverb meaning "here", which is though to be interpreted a bit more extensively as "in this situation, in this circumstance".]
Sbagliando, secondo me. Quel “ci” non ha più valore di avverbio di luogo perché, ribadisco, “volerci” è un verbo procomplementare.
Your statement is a tautology. In the facts, you stated: «"Ci" has not any longer the value of an adverb of place because "volerci" is a pro-complement verb and a pro-complement verb is a verb in which the adverb, having lost its value of adverb, serves the sole purpose to make the verb change its meaning». That means nothing. As I said, it's a mere tautology. You can't use the thesis as an hypothesis. The fact that the verb "volere" changes its meaning in presence of "ci" doesn't imply that "ci" has lost its meaning. That needs to be demonstrated, otherwise it's only an opinion.
Di conseguenza non può neppure essere interpretato come fai tu perché la particella “ci” si è grammaticalizzata e, quindi, desemantizzata. Non la puoi più scorporare dal verbo e prenderla singolarmente perché non può più essere analizzata su un piano puramente semantico.
It's the same as above. All this needs to be demonstrated. There's not even one scholar here who claims to be able to demostrate such a lack of meaning in the clitic "ci". The only one inclined to such a thesis is Sabatini, who is the creator of the adjective "procomplementare", if I'm not wrong. Anyway, according to Sabatini, "ci" has became totally emptied out of its original meaning. Sabatini holds that "ci" originally was a strongly locative and demonstrative adverb, as "here-now", "in this real world", "with these things", "in these circumstances", but progressively weakened in time untill it became an empty particle, whose function is now restricted to change the meaning of the verb. This is a quite respectable opinion, and it's worth nothing that he never said "this can be demonstrated". Throughout his work, you can understand that he's presenting his theory as "this is my idea".

Other scholars, like Devoto-Oli, Serianni and Russi don't feel, in a first instance, at all involved in the problem of the meaning of "ci". The first thing they do is simply to build a reasonably logical layout (like V + Cl + (XP)) to be used as an analysis tool for verbs whose meaning is affected by clitics. Then they examine a large set of people's responses taken from the CORIS/CODIS specialized publications and confront these responses with the layout. This is why Russi's analysis is said to be data driven. The result is that "ci" appears having a "locative" value because a vast majority of people, although admitting to use "ci" routinely, say that "ci" simply means "here" for them. "ci" is not obviously the same "here" that one would translate into the usual Italian adverb "qui". It's a "here" coming from centuries ago. It's kind of a "here" with a more extended extended meaning. That's why our scientists call "ci" "locative" clitic.

As to this term , "Longmann Dictionary of The English Language" reads:
locative - noun - a grammatical case expressing place where or wherein;
also a form in this case [L locus place + E -ative (as in vocative)]. locative adj

So, how would you call an adverb of place that originally had a locative value and still has it? May I reasonably guess you would call it "locative"?

You know, as well as I know, as well as most Italians know, that "vuole" means "he wants" whilst "ci vuole" means "it takes" or "it is necessary/it is needed". That has never been the problem for us. The real issue seems to be the
meaning of "ci". As to me, what I can say is that its meaning is "qui" and in some circumstances this meaning shines high:

"Che caldo!" (Phew! It's hot!)
"E' vero! Ci vorrebbe un gelato!" (Really! We'd need an ice cream here!")

Those who feel the meaning of "ci" not enough strong, sometimes enforce it by means of an additional "here", this time the usual Italian "qui":

"Che caldo!"
"E' vero! Qui ci vorrebbe un gelato!" (Really! In such a hot situation, we'd just need an ice cream here")
[Devo anche ammettere, sinceramente, che non ho capito il motivo della tua domanda conclusiva « By the way, Quintus, did you realize that point 3 of the source you quoted is also about pro-complement verbs? » Se è per questo, anche la maggior parte dei verbi del punto 1 sono classificati nelle grammatiche come verbi procomplementari. Il fatto è che non vedo come ciò possa essere direttamente impiegato ai fini di una spiegazione sul "ci" a una persona di lingua inglese. Porre "ci vuole" = "it takes" è certo corretto ma nulla svela sul significato del "ci".]

E’ vero, anche nel punto 1 ci sono alcuni verbi procomplementari. Ma questo non cambia la sostanza del discorso. Con la mia domanda finale volevo semplicemente dire che sarebbe bastato riconoscere in “volerci” un verbo procomplementare (e il valore che assume il clitico “ci” in questi verbi) e avremmo evitato questa lunga discussione.
No. I don't think so. Until you use the term pro-complement as a mere label, it adds no new information and the reasons for this discussion are still there. To avoid this discussion it would have been sufficient for you to read the first seven lines of my first answer to Michael Jordan:

« Also in this case, "ci" is the adverb meaning "here", which is though to be interpreted a bit more extensively as "in this situation, in this circumstance". In the expression "ci vuole un'ora per andare a", which translates into "it takes one hour to go to", the presence of "ci" might be considered pretty pleonastic: "here it takes one hour to go to". Not really meaningful. With different expressions, you might find it more appropriate, eg. with "ci vorrebbe un cacciavite per...", "here (in this circumstance) one screwdriver would be needed to...". In any case the adverb "ci" is actually pretty pleonastic, but it can't be omitted because it's the expression "ci vuole" as a whole that is recognized in our language, the same way as "it takes" is recognized by native English speakers. »

Quintus

User avatar
Quintus
Posts: 421
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:22 am
Location: Florence, Italy

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Quintus » Sun Jun 17, 2012 4:11 am

ellowen.deeowen wrote:Ciao a tutti.
Non ho mai capito perché si consideri "ci", nel suo significato locativo, un avverbio. In molte grammatiche, insieme a "ne", rientra nella categoria delle particelle pronominali, che è in fondo, come suggerisce il nome stesso, una sottocategoria dei pronomi. E infatti dei pronomi ha tutte le caratteristiche. Anzitutto la funzione di coesione testuale, per cui si riferisce a un elemento del testo precedente (anafora) o successivo (catafora). Voglio dire che "ci" non significa solo "qui" o "lì; può significare di tutto e di più, a seconda dell'elemento che sostituisce (come accade con gli altri pronomi: la, gli ecc.).
Yes, but please have a look to this thread from the beginning. "ci" can be either a pronoun or something else. So far, we have been discussing the nature of this "something else", specifically the value of "ci" in the verb "volerci". In the sentence "ci vuole un'ora per andare da Firenze a Tirrenia", "ci" is not a pronoun (or pronominal particle, if you prefer). The anaphora and cataphora figures apply to pronouns, which, as you said, provide textual cohesion with the next or previous clause. As to "ci", I may agree with you that it can «significare di tutto e di più, a seconda dell'elemento che sostituisce», but if you think of it you will realize that it either takes the place of a noun or is something else. In my opinion, and according to many scholars, this "something else" is always an adverb or, anyway, a particle with a "locative value". Not all share this view.
Se io dico "Vado là" e indico con la mano, l'avverbio deittico "là" basta da solo a chiarire il luogo cui ci si riferisce; se invece dico "ci vado", non posso conoscere la natura di questo luogo a meno di non andare a cercare il riferimento preciso nel testo adiacente (generalmente precedente), quindi "ci" può equivalere a qualsiasi cosa, da "a Roma", "lassù", "qui", fino a "a quel bellissimo concerto di musica classica".
I don't want to go against you, but if you look for the definition of deictic you find that a grammatical element or an expression is said to be deictic when it needs a reference to the context in order to take a meaning. Typical deictic elements/espressions are the space-time ones: qui (here), lì (there), l'anno dopo (the year after) oggi (today) ["deictic" comes from the ancient Greek deiktikòs which is synonymous with "demonstrative"]. So, if you say "I'm going there (là)", pointing your finger at the place you're moving to, the adverb "là" is sufficient for us to understand the spot you are speaking about. Hence it is not deictic by definition. If, instead, you say "ci vado" ("there (ci) I'm going"), the adverb "ci" is not sufficient for us to understand the place you are referring to. We need to look for the meaning of it in some previous context. I suppose this would lead us to state that "ci" is a deictic adverb. If so, I agree (in part). But, in despite of its deplorable deictic nature :D, nevertheless "ci" is, say, "officially acknowledged" as an adverb in all your examples, whilst it is not in the case of the verb "volerci".
Altra caratteristica dei pronomi che "ci" condivide è la posizione che assume rispetto al verbo, proclitica (cioè precede un verbo finito: "ci sono andato") o enclitica (segue un verbo non finito: tornarci), cosa che un avverbio non può fare in alcun modo. Altra prova del fatto che "ci" è un pronome è che compare nei cosiddetti "verbi pronominali", ovvero quei verbi con pronomi di cui fanno parte i vari "esserci", "farcela", "metterci", "volerci" e svariati altri. In questi verbi è difficile classificare con certezza i singoli elementi pronominali, perché i riferimenti testuali dell'espressione originale si sono persi col passare del tempo, e infatti vengono trattati un po' come i phrasal verb dell'inglese: l'aggiunta del pronome modifica (a volte di molto) il significato del verbo. Per cui se aggiungiamo "ci" a "volere", non esprimiamo più una volontà ma finiamo per produrre un verbo dal significato totalmente nuovo, che equivale a "essere necessario", "occorrere".
I won't enter this minefield once again. I will limit to accompany you to its edges. "esserci", "farcela", "metterci",
"volerci" aren't considered pronominal verbs by almost all scholars just because the enclitic "ci" is not a pronoun with
these verbs. As for the rest, yes, the primary meaning of these verbs change when the enclitic particle "ci" is attached to them. In facts, I never said that the meaning of "vuole" is the same as "ci vuole".
Inoltre, "volerci" non è affatto un verbo impersonale; questi ultimi sono verbi come "piovere", dove non è riscontrabile un soggetto grammaticale. Al contrario, in una frase come "Mi ci vogliono almeno due ore per tornare a casa", il soggetto è chiaramente "due ore", come confermato dalla concordanza al plurale del verbo pronominale "volerci". Parafrasando: "due ore sono necessarie a me per tornare a casa"
Spero di essere stato d'aiuto :)
Ciao!
Isn't our country the country of sun, ellowen.deeowen? So, why do so many Italians, when requested to give one example for an impersonal form, keep repeating "it rains"? (piove). There are lots of different impersonal forms. A sentence doesn't need to be supposedly lacking of a grammatical subject to be considered impersonal:
http://www.dizionario-italiano.it/gramm ... ca-137.php
Just thinking of that, here's an alternative way to render "ci vuole un'ora per andare a Tirrenia" into English. Since the Italian impersonal forms are both active and passive, just as the Schrödinger's cat, who's both alive and dead until you open the box,
http://www.lassp.cornell.edu/ardlouis/d ... hrcat.html
my first attempt was to collapse this superposition of states into an active form. Due to the very impersonal nature of the Italian sentence, I suggested to use the impersonal pronoun "it" as a subject: "it wants me to spend one hour to go to Tirrenia", where "it" could be right "it", or something round the corner of "this real world". There's another way though. Given that the grammatical subject of the italian sentence is "one hour", why not to use it in English as well? So, letting "ci" apart for a moment, the Italian sentence translates exactly into "One hour (ci) wants to go to Tirrenia". Please notice that "one hour" is the subject of "wants". Don't know if this helps, but you could think of "one hour" as an animated object, kind of a living creature. Please do not think that this living creature "wants to go to Tirrenia" (Tuscan coastal town) to take eg a bath. No. Things aren't like this. This hour wants something and we have to figure out what. Unfortunately, we can't give her (one hour is feminine) anything because the verb "vuole" is used intransitively in this sentence, hence we can't guess anything like "Our dear hour wants one ice cream". No. It doesn't work like this because she can't take a direct object, say nothing of an ice cream. As a result of this process, the solution can't be else than this: "One hour (ci) wants (to be spent) to go to Tirrenia". As to "ci", please use it as it is or drop it. "ci" is tough, because if "it" is the thing round the corner, "ci" is the corner.

I think I have finished my work with "ci". Need a vacation. Tonight, I've been dreaming of an extraterrestrial creature who ceaselessly repeated in my ear «Non so se col ci ce la si fa o se non ce la si fa ma se ce la si fa ce la si fa ora o non ce la si fa più». My my.

Ciao :D
Quintus

ellowen.deeowen
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2012 1:54 am

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by ellowen.deeowen » Sun Jun 17, 2012 8:59 pm

Caro Quintus,
purtroppo hai torto circa il concetto di deissi.

Scrivi:
So, if you say "I'm going there (là)", pointing your finger at the place you're moving to, the adverb "là" is sufficient for us to understand the spot you are speaking about. Hence it is not deictic by definition.

Beh, è esattamente il contrario di quanto dici. L'avverbio "là" è deittico proprio perché non è affatto sufficiente a sciogliere il dubbio su quale luogo esso indichi, ed è necessario un contesto extratestuale perché si possa capirlo. La deissi, per l'appunto, si applica ogni qual volta è necessario un contesto fisico, esterno al testo, per chiarire la referenza. Altra cosa è la referenza intratestuale, di cui fanno parte anafora e catafora, e che è il caso della particella pronominale "ci".
Porto qualche esempio:
Dialogo 1:
A: Ti va di venire con me da Paolo?
B: Ma vacci tu! Lo sai bene che lo odio!
Qui, per identificare i pronomi "ci" e "lo" come "casa di Paolo" e "Paolo, rispettivamente, basta cercare il referente nel testo, anaforicamente.
Dialogo 2:
A: Arriviamo fin e poi ci fermiamo.
B: No, fermiamoci adesso; sono stremato!
Qui invece come facciamo a identificare il referente se non ci troviamo nel luogo in cui si trovano A e B? Non possiamo, appunto. In questo consiste la deissi, un riferimento extratestuale interamente dipendente dal contesto comunicativo.

Prima di avvicinarmi al nòcciolo della questione, ossia indagare il referente della particella pronominale "ci" in volerci, devo fare una precisazione terminologica: è a partire da De Mauro e dalla compilazione del Gradit che si comincia a parlare di "verbi procomplementari", categoria che del resto non compare in autorevoli grammatiche anteriori al 2000, tra cui quella celeberrima del Serianni; prima di allora li si inglobava in maniera molto distratta (perché sono oggetto di esame approfondito solo da circa 10 anni) nella categoria generica di "verbi pronominali", di cui fanno parte verbi pronominali transitivi come "margiarsi (le unghie)" e pronominali intransitivi come "pentirsi". Quindi è giusto adottarla, e son d'accordo, ma in questa sede, per spiegare la questione a uno straniero, io eviterei di usare terminologie per specialisti, e del resto se si consultano molte grammatiche per stranieri i verbi procomplementari (quando sono trattati) appaiono sotto la categoria di verbi pronominali, mentre quelli pronominali transitivi e intransitivi sono catalogati come riflessivi. E non credo per ignoranza, ma allo scopo di fornire al discente straniero una classificazione semplificata. E' in quest'ottica che parlavo quindi di verbi pronominali.

Ma dunque: volerci...
La tua interpretazione è molto fantasiosa, senza dubbio, ma temo che abbia molto poco di scientifico. Anzitutto, parti da premesse di impersonalità del verbo volerci che non hanno alcun fondamento. Ribadisco che in una frase come "Ci vogliono molte ore per finire questo lavoro", il verbo al plurale non lascia dubbi sul fatto che il soggetto grammaticale sia "molte ore". Detto questo e, dal momento che in nessun libro di linguistica italiana ho trovato cenni sull'origine del significato di "essere necessario" assunto dal verbo procomplementare "volerci", non mi resta che provare anch'io a fare la mia ipotesi, in attesa di trovare fonti storiche attendibili:
"Volere" ha anche il significato di "richiedere"; quindi in una costruzione del genere vedo un'origine passiva piuttosto che impersonale, come se in origine ci fosse stato un si passivante: "si vuole/si vogliono", nel senso di "si richiede/si richiedono".
"Ci vogliono molte ore per..." quindi potrebbe equivalere a "si richiedono molte ore per...".
Ora resta da chiarire il valore di quel "ci": potrebbe essere un "ci" attualizzante (locativo indebolito, come in frasi come "cj'ho fame"), come se l'espressione originale fosse stata "Ci si vogliono molte ore per..." ("Qui si richiedono molte ore per...") con successiva caduta del si passivante; ma chissà, potrebbe anche darsi che quel "si", invece di cadere, si sia trasformato foneticamente, diventando il nostro caro "ci".
In mancanza di ipotesi migliori, questa mi sembra la più logica.
Ciao.

User avatar
Quintus
Posts: 421
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:22 am
Location: Florence, Italy

Re: Problems with 'ci'

Post by Quintus » Mon Jun 25, 2012 2:20 am

ellowen.deeowen wrote:Caro Quintus,
purtroppo hai torto circa il concetto di deissi.
T: {«Dear Quintus, unfortunately you are wrong about the concept of deixis»}
Gulp!
Scrivi:
So, if you say "I'm going there (là)", pointing your finger at the place you're moving to, the adverb "là" is sufficient for us to understand the spot you are speaking about. Hence it is not deictic by definition.

Beh, è esattamente il contrario di quanto dici. L'avverbio "là" è deittico proprio perché non è affatto sufficiente a sciogliere il dubbio su quale luogo esso indichi, ed è necessario un contesto extratestuale perché si possa capirlo. La deissi, per l'appunto, si applica ogni qual volta è necessario un contesto fisico, esterno al testo, per chiarire la referenza. Altra cosa è la referenza intratestuale, di cui fanno parte anafora e catafora, e che è il caso della particella pronominale "ci".
T: {«Beh, it is the exact opposite of what you say. The adverb "là" is deictic just because it is at all insufficient to erase the doubt on what place it indicates, and extratextual context is needed for one to understand what it means. The deixis just applies whenever a physical, extratestual context is needed to clarify the reference. The intratextual reference, of which anaphore and cataphore are part, is a far cry from this, and that is the case of the pronominal particle "ci"»}.

Am I unlearning my mother tongue? ... I hope not... No. I am not:

Case R2D2 - Where both "là" and "ci", in A1 and A2 respectively, need intratextual reference and find it in the previous phrase "Tom's party", in A.
A: Vuoi venire con me alla festa di Tom? Do you want to come with me to Tom's party?
A1: No! Non voglio andare là! - No! I don't want to go there! (I don't want to go right there)
A2: No! Non ci voglio andare! - No! I don't want to go there!
You can immediately see that your statement «The adverb "là" is deictic just because [...], and extratextual context is needed in order that one can understand it» is wrong. "là" needs the usual intratextual reference here, not an extratextual context.

Case R22D - Where both "là" and "ci", in B1 and B2 respectively, need extratextual context.
B: - There's an empty room at the beginning of the story (book, film, comic). Nothing in it but one chair. A brown-haired woman sits down on the chair. Some time later you hear her calling (or, the speach bubble reads):
B1: Sei tu là Tom? - Is it you there, Tom? - (Who's really there?)
B2: Tom, ci sei? - You here, Tom? - (Was she waiting for him?)
You can see at once that your statement «The intratextual reference, of which anaphore and cataphore are part, is a far cry from this, and that is the case of the pronominal particle "ci"» is wrong. "ci" doesn't need any intratextual reference here for one to understand what it means. What one needs is to hear footstep noise in the hallway, just the same noise which caused the woman to shout. For a comic, a previous bubble pointing out of the frame would read: "scuffin' scuffin' scuffin' ", ie "sciaff sciaff sciaff" in Italian, but in this case only if the visitor wore slippers.

It follows that the use of both "là" and "ci" can't be a-priori restricted to anything. Something that should have been
obvious to you was again shielded by those anaphoric, cataphoric, deictic, ornamental boxes where you keep your adverbs enclosed. That said, if you like to stick your deictic label to D2R2 or R22D, it's a choice of yours. You tell me and I'll be ok with it.
Prima di avvicinarmi al nòcciolo della questione, ossia indagare il referente della particella pronominale "ci" in volerci, devo fare una precisazione terminologica: è a partire da De Mauro e dalla compilazione del Gradit che si comincia a parlare di "verbi procomplementari", categoria che del resto non compare in autorevoli grammatiche anteriori al 2000, tra cui quella celeberrima del Serianni; prima di allora li si inglobava in maniera molto distratta (perché sono oggetto di esame approfondito solo da circa 10 anni) nella categoria generica di "verbi pronominali", di cui fanno parte verbi pronominali transitivi come "margiarsi (le unghie)" e pronominali intransitivi come "pentirsi". Quindi è giusto adottarla, e son d'accordo, ma in questa sede, per spiegare la questione a uno straniero, io eviterei di usare terminologie per specialisti, e del resto se si consultano molte grammatiche per stranieri i verbi procomplementari (quando sono trattati) appaiono sotto la categoria di verbi pronominali, mentre quelli pronominali transitivi e intransitivi sono catalogati come riflessivi. E non credo per ignoranza, ma allo scopo di fornire al discente straniero una classificazione semplificata. E' in quest'ottica che parlavo quindi di verbi pronominali.
T (in part): {«... So it's right to adopt it, I agree, but in a place like this, to explain the issue to a foreigner, I would avoid using complex terminologies... I would avoid to use terminologies for specialists... with the aim of supplying the foreign learner with a simplified sorting.»}

In your sentence «Quindi è giusto adottarla (So, it's right to adopt it)», what this la refers to, ellowen.deeowen? It is the pro-complement verb category thing four lines above, isn't it? If so, may I ask you WHO adopted it? It was not I. The first thing one should do before posting to a thread would be to carefully read ALL the messages. And, as it has been already shown by your previous post, you didn't read them. As for the rest, was it me to talk about textual cohesion, deixis and deictic adverbs, referee, anaphora and cataphora figures, intratextual and extratextual references, pronominal transitive and intransitive verbs? NO. It was not I, it was YOU. Therefore I can't help to agree with you: you'd better avoid them.
Ma dunque: volerci...
La tua interpretazione è molto fantasiosa, senza dubbio, ma temo che abbia molto poco di scientifico. Anzitutto, parti da premesse di impersonalità del verbo volerci che non hanno alcun fondamento. Ribadisco che in una frase come "Ci vogliono molte ore per finire questo lavoro", il verbo al plurale non lascia dubbi sul fatto che il soggetto grammaticale sia "molte ore".
T: {«Your interpretation is very imaginative, no doubt, but I'm afraid it has little in common with science. First of all, you start from premises which have no foundations about impersonal nature of the verb volerci. I reassert that in a sentence like "ci vogliono molte ore per finire questo lavoro", the verb at plural ensures that the grammatical subjects is "molte ore".}

Afraid not. I am in charge with my scientific destiny.
I would prefer to stand by your assessments especially when you express opinions instead of providing any reasonable
evidence at all. Though your "ribadisco" is tempting for me to ask you, what if I "ribadissi" in turn? I guess you
"ribadiresti", whereupon I couldn't help to "ribadire", in a way that you would feel pushed to "ribadire", so that all I could do would be, alas, "ribadire", and you "ribadiresti" one more time, an so on, again and again and again, in a endless, inconsiderate, rumbling rolling down the side of our "ribadimenti" [1] ridge, which at a point would cause our host to run out of disk-space or catch fire. Would this look like polite to you?

However, since you "ribadisci", I feel justified to "ribadire" that you are not able to tear yourself away from those basic, impersonal forms like "it rains" (piove), "it's snowing" (nevica), "it’s windy" (tira vento), "it hails" (gràndina).
And I can't help you with such a bad weather there. I posted a link for you about various sets of impersonal forms and you seem having ignored it. So, for what it's worth, here are some hints more about the impersonal verb "volerci":

"In alcuni casi (è sempre d’esempio volerci), poi, hanno anche valore impersonale"
http://linguista.blogautore.repubblica. ... inguista4/
-
Page 5: "I verbi impersonali servire, volerci, bastare e bisognare"
http://www.edilingua.it/Upload/arrivede ... ec.pdf.pdf
-
Fate attenzione che l’espressione VOLERCI è impersonale ed è sempre usata alla terza persona singolare o plurale.
http://www.google.it/url?q=http://www.c ... RZtk46WueA
-
2. Verbi usati impersonalmente.
"Alcuni verbi, come, volerci, piacere, mancare, ecc., possono essere usati impersonalmente. In questo uso essi prendono l'ausiliare essere"
http://www.gicas.net/ne.html
Detto questo e, dal momento che in nessun libro di linguistica italiana ho trovato cenni sull'origine del significato di "essere necessario" assunto dal verbo procomplementare "volerci", non mi resta che provare anch'io a fare la mia ipotesi, in attesa di trovare fonti storiche attendibili: "Volere" ha anche il significato di "richiedere"; quindi in una costruzione del genere vedo un'origine passiva piuttosto che impersonale, come se in origine ci fosse stato un si passivante: "si vuole/si vogliono", nel senso di "si richiede/si richiedono". "Ci vogliono molte ore per..." quindi potrebbe equivalere a "si richiedono molte ore per..."
T: {«That said, and since I could not find any mention of the origin of the meaning of "to be necessary" as taken by the pro-complement verb "volerci" in any book about Italian linguistics, all that remains for me is to try and speculate while waiting for trustworthy historical founts: "Volere" also takes the meaning of "to request"; hence I see a passive origin in such a construction rather than a impersonal one, as if a "passive si" was there: "it is wanted/they are wanted", in the sense of "it is requested/they are requested. So, "it takes many our to..." could equate to "many hours are requested to..."}

As a theory set up to show that my interpretation is fanciful and has little in common with science, I feel quite empty
handed. Is the discovery that "volere" may take the meaning of "to request" to be considered the sound foundation of a novel theory? A "passive si" is not there, you know it, but you say you see it. Are you looking inside a crystal ball? You decided that speculation was needed because the books you used to base your theory are failing you. I'd suggest you to have a look at my post on Sat Jun 16, 2012 11:12 pm.

«I reassert that in a sentence like "ci vogliono molte ore per finire questo lavoro", the verb at plural ensures that the grammatical subjects is "molte ore"...»

Both in impersonal "si" and "ci" constructions, the agreement between the verb and the noun "ore" is nothing more than a gentlemen agreement between those two grammar characters. It doesn't add anything to the impersonal nature of the sentence, and it doesn't take anything off either. Tuscans often say "Ci vuole molte ore per finire questo lavoro", "Ehi guarda, da qui si vede le montagne" instead of "Ci vogliono molte ore per finire questo lavoro", "Ehi guarda, da qui si vedono le montagne". I admit, I do that myself too, at times. "Si vede le montagne" is actually way more expressive than "si vedono le montagne" because it preserves the strong impersonal nature of "si vede", also when a noun, which is a direct object to all intents and purposes, is coupled with the impersonal "si vede", which couldn't take a direct object by definition.

"si vede le montagne", although effective as an expression, is a bit sloppy one because the verb is at the third person singular and the noun is plural. So, an agreement between them is needed. This agreement is found in conjugating the verb at the third person plural, from wich the so said "si passivante" version ("passive si", in English) of the "impersonal si" construction is first originated and then raised to the range of "variation" of it.

When a "impersonal "si" construction is followed by a noun, according to A. L. & G. Lepschy (literal transcription follows), «one finds an unexpected agreement in number between the verb and the object: "si compra una penna", "one buys a pen", "si comprano due penne", "one buys two pens"».

First of all, why did A. L. & G. Lepschy wrote "the verb and the object"? In the sentences "si compra una penna", "one buys a pen", "si comprano due penne", "one buys two pens"», the nouns "penna" and "penne" are generally acknowledged as subjects (see below). The answer can be found watching their translation into English: since the verb "comprare" (to buy) is transitive and "penna/penne" is the logical object of it, the Authors feel that the "passive si" construction in those sentences has an active meaning and consequently use the English impersonal active form to translate: "one buys a pen", "one buys two pens" where "pen" and "pens" are direct objects.

And here's a very limited portion of what Accademia della Crusca has to say about the "passive si" construction:

http://www.accademiadellacrusca.it/faq/ ... hp?id=7477

(translation to English follows)
«If the "impersonal si" construction has to be applied to a transitive verb with its direct object, a version can be found where the direct object is transformed into the subject of the verb which therefore must fit the subject:

"si mangia le mele" (noi mangiamo le mele, we eat apples, where apples is the direct object) transforms into
"si mangiano le mele (le mele sono mangiate, apples are eaten, where apples is the subject)

This 'version', which takes the name of "si passivante", is mandatory in Italian when the direct object is not a clitic
pronoun.»

That means that such a construction, in despite of its name "passive si", doesn't necessarily need to be interpreted or felt as a passive one. The "passive si" construction doesn't transform the actual construction of a sentence into a passive one. It only makes possible for a transitive verb to acquire a passive value while the verb is allowed to keep its active form. And this is the only way in which the agreement I mentioned above can be found.

Do you realize that equating "ci vogliono molte ore per" to "si richiedono molte ore per" is as actually stating that the former is a impersonal item? As a matter of fact, the item on the right side of your "equation" is the impersonal item par excellence.
Ora resta da chiarire il valore di quel "ci": potrebbe essere un "ci" attualizzante (locativo indebolito, come in frasi come "cj'ho fame"), come se l'espressione originale fosse stata "Ci si vogliono molte ore per..." ("Qui si richiedono molte ore per...") con successiva caduta del si passivante; ma chissà, potrebbe anche darsi che quel "si", invece di cadere, si sia trasformato foneticamente, diventando il nostro caro "ci". In mancanza di ipotesi migliori, questa mi sembra la più logica.
Ciao.
T: «We are left now to clarify the value of that "ci": it could be an actualizing "ci" (weakened locative, as in sentences like "cj'ho fame)...»

Others think that an actualizing "ci" can't be locative at all, albeit weakened, and the other way round. In my opinion it is locative, how much weakened it depends on the context in which the verb "volerci" is used. In some contexts, it is not weakened at all.

T: «...as if the expression was originally "Ci si vogliono molte ore per" [untraslatable] ("Qui si richiedono molte ore per", "here many hours are requested") with a successive drop of the passive "si"; but, who knows, instead of being dropped, "si" might even have undergone a phonetic trasformation, becoming our dear "ci". For want of anything better hypothesis, this seems the most logical one to me.»

I can't share any of your points. I would call your hypothesis "the one you love most of all" rather than "the most logical one". In my opinion, the presence of "si" in your reasoning is unnecessary and a bit intrusive as well. There's a profound difference between "ci" and "si". For the same reason, I think you won't ever find any trustworthy historical fount about the meaning of "to be necessary" as taken by the pro-complement verb "volerci". If there was a linguistic relationship between "to be necessary" and "to want", it would have already been found after twenty centuries. Instead, any inexpensive etymological dictionary will tell you about the difference between these two words. This does not mean, of course, that "volerci" can't take the meaning of "to be necessary". I'm speaking of their linguistic relationship.

The construction "ci vuole" comes straight from Latin. In my opinion, it had a precise sense, not a impersonal one.
It became impersonal when, due to the abuse of it, it turned into a cliché. And that happened much, much before eg Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

Ciao,
Quintus

_____________________
[1] G. Devoto - G. C. Oli - Il dizionario della lingua italiana - "Ribadimenti", see page 1592 - Paragraph 2 of 2

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest