Verb tables with accents?

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Etienne
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Verb tables with accents?

Post by Etienne »

I was surprised to find out that erano and siano and temono among others have their accents on the first syllable. Does anybody know a book or a web site that has all the verbs with the accents? (Not talking about the accent marks on a few verbs, but the actual accents, at least all the irregular ones.)

Grazie
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Davide
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Re: Verb tables with accents?

Post by Davide »

You don't need the accents marked. All you need to remember is that with the third person plural (the 'they' form) the stess ALWAYS goes on the root of the verb (known also as the 'stem') rather than on the ending. So:

parlano
vadano
dicono
temevono

As you can see from the last example, it isn't that the stress falls on the first syllable of the verb form, but it's ALWAYS on the third to last syllable (ante-penultimate). These types of words are known in Italian as parole sdrucciole.
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Etienne
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Re: Verb tables with accents?

Post by Etienne »

Davide wrote:You don't need the accents marked. All you need to remember is that with the third person plural (the 'they' form) the stess ALWAYS goes on the root of the verb (known also as the 'stem') rather than on the ending.
Thanks Davide. But I'm not sure how that clears up, for example, where the accent goes on temessero, and temerebbero.
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Davide
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Re: Verb tables with accents?

Post by Davide »

Just remember what I said about the stress falling on the antepenultimate syllable: that is, the third syllable from the end.

temessero
parlerebbero
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Etienne
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Re: Verb tables with accents?

Post by Etienne »

Oh, ok, that is a bit different. Great. But what about fossimo? That's first person plural. That accent doesn't go on the ending does it?
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Davide
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Re: Verb tables with accents?

Post by Davide »

fossimo - penultimate syllable.
Of course this doesn't always work - for example andranno. Here, the stress is on the penultimate syllable. But with irregular verbs, well you just have to learn the stress as you come across these verbs.
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Quintus
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Re: Verb tables with accents?

Post by Quintus »

Etienne wrote:I was surprised to find out that erano and siano and temono among others have their accents on the first syllable. Does anybody know a book or a web site that has all the verbs with the accents? (Not talking about the accent marks on a few verbs, but the actual accents, at least all the irregular ones.) Grazie
I've found this book "Volume 1: la ricerca dell'infinito"
http://www.locuta.com/books.html
but couldn't understand if it's in Italian or English. Given the nature of the site, it should be in English. Also, try and search the net with these keywords:
tavole di verbi italiani con accenti
regole per l'accentazione dei verbi italiani
verbi italiani e accenti
come accentare i verbi

We don't use to study this matter at school, as everybody is assumed to be able to speak the language and stress any word in a correct way. So, they limit to correct errors and give suggestions to the students who, possibly influenced by their regional dialects, are prone to make too many mistakes.

Thus I don't know if you can find tables of the whole set of italian verbs with accents. Also admitted you find them, you will have to learn tens of thousands of voices. For all practical purposes, moving the stress away from the right place in any type of word (verbs, nouns, prepositions, etc. ) won't prevent us to understand what you are saying.

So, I could propose an additional, more empirical approach.

(1) - Using a synthesizer to find the position of the accent

The fact that you are looking for literature shouldn't imply that you are not able to recognize the position of the accent in a spoken word. So, try and go here:

S1
http://translate.google.it/

select "From: Italian", type a word in the box and click the loudspeaker icon near the bottom-right corner of the box. Try with these words (all three of them together or one by one. If all three, never forget to insert spaces and hyphens):

erano - siano - temono

It correctly reads èrano, sìano, tèmono. I assure you, the pronunciation is EXCELLENT. She speaks much better than me! :)

BTW I have found that the Google Synthesizer (A), although responsive and fast, tends to make severe pronunciation errors when you give it words with more than three syllables. More long the word more often it seems to need to split it in two pieces and stress them separatedly. The following synthesizer is slower to run but works far better:

S2
http://imtranslator.net/translate-and-speak/#

Uncheck Translate - Set Speak to Italian - Set Speed to Slower - Let Embed unchecked
Paste your words in the box (don't forget spaces and hyphens!) and click the large blue button.

If you are able to recognize the position of an accent from the voice stress, these synthesizers could work for you as universal tables.

-

(2) - Using a synthesizer to practise stressed words

If you aren't able to recognize the position of the accent of a spoken word, then first try and become familiar with it. It's not so difficult. The first thing to do would be to use a simpler terminology to define words depending on the position of the accent. The Italian terminology is particularly simple. I'd suggest to use it or its direct translation to English:

Parole tronche - (truncated words) - The accent is on the last syllable (1 2 3):

città (city), fa (does), perché (because), poiché (as, since), alcunché (anything), affinché (so that), me (me), te [té]
(thee), te [tè] (tea), servitù (servants & servitude), tu (thou), può (he can/may), sarà (s/he/it will be), in (in)
These words are also called "ossitone" (oxytone).

-

Parole piane - (plain, or flat words) - The accent is on the penultimate syllable (1 2 3 4):

parlàre (to talk), dìre (to say), elefànte (elephant), sèi (you are & six), chitàrra (guitar), insième (together), sètte
(seven), ùno (one & a), pésca (fishing), pèsca (peach), trèno (train), dìce (s/he says), dìre (to say), capitàno (captain)
[These words are also called "parossitone" (paroxitone). The number of them is predominant in Italian]

-

Parole sdrucciole - (sliding words) - The accent is on the ante-penultimate syllable (1 2 3 4):

èssere (to be), màcchina (machine & car), fùrono (they were), dìmmelo (tell it to me), dàmmelo (give it to me), bàmbola (doll), bòmbola (cylinder), tènero (tendre), dìcono (they say), cómprano (they buy), làvano (they wash), rìdono (they laugh)
[These words are also called "proparossitone" (proparoxitone)]

-

Parole bisdrucciole - (bi-sliding words) - The accent is on the syllable preceding the ante-penultimate syllable
(1 2 3 4 5):

edìficano (they build), scìvolano (they slide), càpitano (they occur), àbitano (they inhabit), dòndolano (they swing),
pàrlamene (talk me of it), cómpramelo (buy it to me), dimenticàndosene ([s/he], forgetting it), consìderano (they consider), comunicàtemelo (communicate it to me)
[Words of thys type are uncommon. Many of them are made up of verbs and clitic pronouns]

-

Parole trisdrucciole - (tri-sliding words) - The accent is on the fifth to last syllable (1 2 3 4 5):

òccupatene (take care of it), rècitamelo (recite it for me), semplìficamelo (made it simpler for me), fàbbricamelo (build it for me), órdinaglielo (order it to him), ìntimamelo (order it to me)
[These words are very uncommon. Even in this case, they are made up of verbs and clitic pronouns]



Practice with accents

I'd advice you to start with words made up of three syllables. You can find a lot of stuff on the net on how to divide a word in syllables (search for "divisione in sillabe"), but this part is not strictly necessary. A three syllable word will always have at least three vowels. For example "cantano" (they sing). Where is the accent of "cantano"? If you type this word as it is, ie with no accents, both S1 and S2 will pronounce it correctly. So, let's suppose you are still dubious about the position of the accent after listening to "cantano". This is a very easy doubt to cancel. Give the synthesizer this line of text:

cantano - càntano - cantàno - cantanò

The second word is the right one since it is pronounced exactly as the first. However, the synt S1 will vary the lenght of the explicitly accented vowels slightly, which is incorrect, while S2 will perfom beautifully in all cases. Here's more examples according to Etienne's original request:

temessero - témessero - teméssero - temesséro - temesserò
Using the synt S2 you will realize that the right accent is on the third word. The second word sounds a bit odd, but this is normal. I'd have, myself, some problems to stress the first syllable of temessero. Once more, S2 seems doing its job very well.

temerebbero - témerebbero - temérebbero - temerébbero - temerebbéro - temerebberò
Always using S2, things start becoming critical here. In the case, try and shake the bottle by changing the Speed from Slower to Slowest and then to Normal. The right word is the fourth one. As in the previous example, we have here that the second and third word are very difficult for S2 to pronounce, which occurs to me too. BTW the remedy is simple: instead of giving S2 all words together, give it them couple by couple: 1-6, 1-5, 1-4, (1-3, 1-2). When you are at 1-4 you will find it superfluous to carry on. If you keep hearing a difference between temerebbero and temerébbero, it's because the accented é of temerébbero has the wrong accent. I used the closed é everywhere for simplicity, but the right vowel should be an open è, like this:

temerebbero - temerèbbero (closed-e/closed-e/open-e/closed-e/closed-o => témérèbbéró)

fossimo - fóssimo - fossìmo - fossimó
This one is elementary.


How to get accented vowels

While keeping the ALT key down type the three digit number shown in the table below using the numeric pad. For the sake of simplicity use é and ò everywhere you need to have an accented e or o. In the case, try it with both the open and closed vowel.

ALT + 133 à
ALT + 130 é - closed e
ALT + 138 è - open e
ALT + 141 ì
ALT + 162 ó - closed o
ALT + 149 ò - open o
ALT + 151 ù

---

In case of difficulty, ask the forum.

Quintus
Etienne
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Re: Verb tables with accents?

Post by Etienne »

Quintus wrote: I've found this book "Volume 1: la ricerca dell'infinito"
http://www.locuta.com/books.html
but couldn't understand if it's in Italian or English. Given the nature of the site, it should be in English. Also, try and search the net with these keywords:
tavole di verbi italiani con accenti
regole per l'accentazione dei verbi italiani
verbi italiani e accenti
come accentare i verbi
The book is just a two column table of Italian words, so it is in Italian. If you want something similar, there are a couple of older references I can give you that you can get online, things in the public domain. And they have differing types of tables. One has the two column table, like the book you linked to. I don't like that type because you often want to know more than the infinitive, especially for very old words. The other has a conjugation table but with more than one entry per space. That I prefer. Tells you what conjugation class you are looking at. But having accents would be nice! How much again? Hmm. I'll put it on the want list.

Thanks for the search tips. I found a good site.

The way it seems to me now is just that for the regular -are, -ere, and -ire verbs:
a) the third person plural are parole sdrucciole except for the future
b) the first person plural of the imperfect subjunctive are parole sdrucciole.
That is the answer to my original question.

Very helpful great response Quintus. Only thing I might quibble with is when you speak of tens of thousands of forms, I would suggest that they could probably be captured in about 60 rules since that is roughly the number of different verb paradigms in play.
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Quintus
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Re: Verb tables with accents?

Post by Quintus »

Etienne wrote: The book is just a two column table of Italian words, so it is in Italian. If you want something similar, there are a couple of older references I can give you that you can get online, things in the public domain. And they have differing types of tables. One has the two column table, like the book you linked to. I don't like that type because you often want to know more than the infinitive, especially for very old words. The other has a conjugation table but with more than one entry per space. That I prefer. Tells you what conjugation class you are looking at. But having accents would be nice! How much again? Hmm. I'll put it on the want list.

Thanks for the search tips. I found a good site.

The way it seems to me now is just that for the regular -are, -ere, and -ire verbs:
a) the third person plural are parole sdrucciole except for the future
b) the first person plural of the imperfect subjunctive are parole sdrucciole.
That is the answer to my original question.

Very helpful great response Quintus. Only thing I might quibble with is when you speak of tens of thousands of forms, I would suggest that they could probably be captured in about 60 rules since that is roughly the number of different verb paradigms in play.
You are right Etienne, one does not have to learn tens of thousands of voices, as I wrote. Producing tables of verbs with accents would be more expensive only for the publisher, but as to the reader, if one limits to consider all the possible paradigms, the number to deal with is by far smaller than that.

Your point about the 60 paradigms was very interesting to me. So, I tried to learn something. My sensation was that the position of the accent for each one of the six persons of any tense and mood doesn't depend, or depends only minimally, on the degree of irregularity of a verb, and probably not so much on the "are", "ere" or "ire" type of its conjugation. Since building a layout of paradigms would require a big dose of patience and a lot of time to me, I tried by another approach.

The starting point was your statement (b) "the first person plural of the imperfect subjunctive are parole sdrucciole".
That looks at all correct to me, I couldn't find exceptions, not even considering irregular, inchoative, reflexive, inchoative-reflexive and any other ilk of verbs that my language created, to say nothing of the fact that even the type of conjugation seems really not influencing the accents of the imperfect subjunctive. But while thinking of your statement (a) "the third person plural are parole sdrucciole except for the future", I came across "causare" (to cause), a first conjugation regular verb, whose present indicative is:

io càuso [sdrucciola]
tu càusi [sdrucciola]
egli càusa [sdrucciola]
noi càusiamo [sdrucciola]
voi càusate [sdrucciola]
essi càusano [bisdrucciola], cà-u-sa-no]

After this, I started being convinced that it was necessary to localize all the moods and tenses exhibiting a regular accent pattern so to be able to put them apart and carry on with the rest.

Consequently, I first draw the following list with all the possible moods along with the simple tenses of each of them (p. is for persons):

FINITE MOODS

INDICATIVE: (1) Present [6 p.], (2) Imperfect [6 p.], (3) Simple Past [6 p.], (4) Future [6. p]
SUBJUNCTIVE: (5) Present [6 p.], (6) Imperfect [6 p.]
CONDITIONAL: (7) Present [6 p.]
IMPERATIVE: (8) Present [2 p.]


NON-FINITE MOODS

INFINITIVE: (9) Present [1 voice]
PARTICIPLE: (10) Present [1 voice], (11) Past [1 voice]
GERUND: (12) Present [1 voice]

and then tested a number of verbs of any type against each tense, either the regular and irregular ones of any conjugation. The compound tenses aren't of our interest in our discussion, as any voice of a compound tense is made up with two pieces, and each of them falls back into one of the twelve above mentioned categories.

This is the list I used for the irregular verbs:

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verbi_irregolari_italiani

The author claims that the list is updated and contains all Italian irregular verbs, except the defective and inchoative ones. The defective verbs are those lacking one or more voices, hence they can't influence our discussion. As to the inchoative verbs, I extended my test to some of them too. A list, hopefully exhaustive, of 740 of them can be found here:

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verbi_incoativi

But anyway the addition of "-isc" to a stem doesn't seem having any influence.

As for the regular verbs, I used several lists I found in various places, just with the aim to dig for exceptions into areas where I normally don't use to walk on.

To make things easier to read for everybody, I'd propose to use this notation to indicate the position of an accent:

nt

where n is the number of the syllable on which the accent is placed, starting the count of the syllables from the last and moving from right to left, and t is for type, so that "a 2t word" is for "a word of second type". In this way, the position of the accent can be immediately understood without having to know any specific terminology. For example:

parlerà is a 1t word: par-le-rà [1t = parola tronca, also said ossitona/oxytone]
parlerémo is a 2t word: par-le-ré-mo [2t = parola piana, also said parossitona/paroxitone]
parlàssimo is a 3t word: par-làs-si-mo [3t = parola sdrucciola also called proparossitone/proparoxitone]
comunicàtemelo is a 4t word: co-mu-ni-cà-te-me-lo [4t = parola bisdrucciola, with no additional denomination]
semplìficamelo is a 5t word: sem-plì-fi-ca-me-lo [5t = parola trisdrucciola, with no additional denomination]

-

What I have found is that at least three areas may be detected for accent patterns:

- An area A, where the accent pattern of certain categories of moods and tenses look constant for each mode-tense pair of both regular and irregular verbs of any conjugation. Referring to the ID numbers used in the above mentioned general list, these mood-tense pairs are:

(12) Present Gerund, (10) Present Participle, (11) Past Participle, (4) Future Indicative, (7) Present Conditional, (2) Imperfect Indicative, (6) Imperfect Subjunctive

- An area B, where the accent pattern of the pair (3) Simple Past Indicative starts showing exceptions, even though these exceptions don't seem evenly correlated with irregularities and conjugations.

- An area C, not accurately investigated yet, where regular verbs of the first conjugation show variable accent patterns. In my opinion, this area should contain:

(1) Present Indicative, (5) Present Subjunctive, (8) Present Imperative, (9) Present Infinitive


- A - Regular pattern area

GERUND - (12) Present [1 voice]

The present gerund of any verb always appears to be a 2t (piana) word. The pattern is:

Pattern #12: 2t

Example:
andare (to go): and-ànd-o [2t]

-

PARTICIPLE - (10) Present [1 voice]

The present participle of any verb looks like a 2t (piana) word. The pattern is:

Pattern #10: 2t

Example:
andare (to go): an-dàn-te [2t]

-

PARTICIPLE - (11) Past [1 voice]

The past participle of any verb always appears to be a 2t (piana) word. The pattern is:

Pattern #11: 2t (piana)

Example:
andare: an-dà-to [2t]

-

INDICATIVE - (4) Future [6 persons]

The future indicative of any Italian verb always appears to follow this pattern:

Pattern #4: 1t (tronca), 2t (piana), 1t (tronca), 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 2t (piana)

For example, we have for the verb "partìre" (to leave):
io partirò [1t]
tu partirài [2t]
egli partirà [1t]
noi partirémo [2t]
voi partiréte [2t]
essi partirànno [2t]

As a further examples, using the irregular verb "andare" (to go, 1st conj.), the regular "danzare" (to dance, 1st conj.), the regular "temere" (to fear, 2nd conj.), the irregular "spàrgere" (to spread/scatter, 2nd conj.), the regular "dormire" (to sleep, 3rd conj.), the irregular "inferire" (to infer, 3rd conj.) and the inchoative "capire" (to understand, 3rd conj.), we have :

io an-drò, dan-ze-rò, te-me-rò, spar-ge-rò, dor-mi-rò, in-fe-ri-rò, ca-pi-rò [1t, all]
tu an-drà-i, dan-ze-rà-i, te-me-rà-i, spar-ge-rà-i, dor-mi-rà-i, in-fe-ri-rà-i, ca-pi-rà-i [2t, all]
egli an-drà, dan-ze-rà, te-me-rà, spar-ge-rà, dor-mi-rà, in-fe-ri-rà, ca-pi-rà [1t, all]
noi an-dré-mo, dan-ze-ré-mo, te-me-ré-mo, dor-mi-ré-mo, in-fe-ri-ré-mo, ca-pi-ré-mo [2t, all]
voi an-dré-te, dan-ze-ré-te, te-me-ré-te, dor-mi-ré-te, in-fe-ri-ré-te, ca-pi-ré-te [2t, all]
essi an-dràn-no, dan-ze-ràn-no, te-me-ràn-no, dor-mi-ràn-no, in-fe-ri-ràn-no, ca-pi-ràn-no [2t, all]

-

CONDITIONAL - (7) Present [6 persons]

The present conditional of any Italian verb always appears to follow this pattern:

Pattern #7: 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 3t (sdrucciola)

Example for partire (to leave):
io partirèi [2t]
tu partrésti [2t]
egli partìrèbbe [2t]
noi partirémmo [2t]
voi partiréste [2t]
essi partirèbbero [3t]

As a further examples, using the irregular verb "avere" (to have, 1st conj.), the regular "attaccare" (to attach & attack, 1st conj.), the regular "succedere" (to happen & succeed, 2nd conj.), the irregular "promettere" (to promise, 2nd conj.), the regular "frinire" (to shrill, 3rd conj.), the irregular "salire" (to go up, 3rd conj.) and the inchoative "zittire" (to hush, 3rd conj.), we have :

io a-vrè-i, at-tac-che-rè-i, suc-ce-de-rè-i, pro-met-te-rè-i, fri-ni-rè-i, sa-li-rè-i, zit-ti-rè-i [2t, all]
tu a-vrè-sti, at-tac-che-rè-sti, suc-ce-de-rè-sti, pro-met-te-rè-sti, fri-ni-rè-sti, sa-li-rè-sti, zit-ti-rè-sti [2t, all]
egli a-vrèb-be, at-tac-che-rèb-be, suc-ce-de-rèb-be, pro-met-te-rèb-be, fri-ni-rèb-be, sa-li-rèb-be, zit-ti-rèb-be [2t, all]
noi a-vrèm-mo, at-tac-che-rèm-mo, suc-ce-de-rèm-mo, pro-met-te-rèm-mo, fri-ni-rèm-mo, sa-li-rèm-mo, zit-ti-rèm-mo [2t, all]
voi a-vrè-ste, at-tac-che-rè-ste, suc-ce-de-rè-ste, pro-met-te-rè-ste, fri-ni-rè-ste, sa-li-rè-ste, zit-ti-rè-ste [2t, all]
essi a-vrèb-be-ro, at-tac-che-rèb-be-ro, suc-ce-de-rèb-be-ro, pro-met-te-rèb-be-ro, fri-ni-rèb-be-ro, sa-li-rèb-be-ro, zit-ti-rèb-be-ro [3t, all]

-

INDICATIVE - (2) Imperfect [6 persons]

The imperfect indicative of any Italian verb always appears to follow this pattern:

Pattern #2: 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 3t (sdrucciola)

Example for partire (to leave):
io partìvo [2t]
tu partìvi [2t]
egli partìva [2t]
noi partivàmo [2t]
voi partivàte [2t]
essi partìvano [3t]

As a further examples, using the irregular verb "andare" (to go, 1st conj.), the regular "arringare" (to harangue, 1st conj.), the regular "ricevere" (to receive, 2nd conj.), the irregular "essere" (to be, 2nd conj.), the regular "sortire" (to go out, 3rd conj.), the irregular "offrire" (to offer, 3rd conj.) and the reflexive-inchoative "assopire (assopirsi)" (to doze off, 3rd conj.), we have :

io an-dà-vo, ar-rin-gà-vo, ri-ce-vé-vo, è-ro, sor-tì-vo, of-frì-vo, (mi) as-so-pì-vo [2t, all]
tu an-dà-vi, ar-rin-gà-vi, ri-ce-vé-vi, è-ri, sor-tì-vi, of-frì-vi, (ti) as-so-pì-vi [2t, all]
egli an-dà-va, ar-rin-gà-va, ri-ce-vé-va, è-ra, sor-tì-va, of-frì-va, (ti) as-so-pì-va [2t, all]
noi an-da-và-mo, ar-rin-ga-và-mo, ri-ce-ve-và-mo, e-ra-và-mo, sor-ti-và-mo, of-fri-và-mo, (ci) as-so-pi-và-mo [2t, all]
voi an-da-và-te, ar-rin-ga-và-te, ri-ce-ve-và-te, e-ra-và-te, sor-ti-và-te, of-fri-và-te, (vi) as-so-pi-và-te [2t, all]
essi an-dà-va-no, ar-rin-gà-va-no, ri-ce-vé-va-no, è-ra-no, sor-tì-va-no, of-frì-va-no, (si) as-so-pì-va-no [3t, all]

-

SUBJUNCTIVE - (6) Imperfect [6 persons]

The imperfect subjunctive of any Italian verb always appears to follow this pattern:

Pattern #6: 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 3t (sdrucciola), 2t (piana), 3t (sdrucciola)

Example for partire (to leave):
io partìssi [2t]
tu partìssi [2t]
egli partìsse [2t]
noi partìssimo [3t]
voi partìste [2t]
essi partìssero [3t]

As a further examples, using the irregular verb "fare" (to do/make, 1st conj.), the regular "aspettare" (to wait, 1st conj.), the regular "vendere" (to sell, 2nd conj.), the irregular "espellere" (to expel, 2nd conj.), the regular "agire" (to act, 3rd conj.), the irregular "dire" (to say/tell, 3rd conj.) and the inchoative "aborrire" (to abhor, 3rd conj.), we have :

io fa-cés-si, as-pet-tàs-si, ven-dés-si, es-pel-lés-si, a-gìs-si, di-cés-si, a-bor-rìs-si [2t, all]
tu fa-cés-si, as-pet-tàs-si, ven-dés-si, es-pel-lés-si, a-gìs-si, di-cés-si, a-bor-rìs-si [2t, all]
egli fa-cés-se, as-pet-tàs-se, ven-dés-se, es-pel-lés-se, a-gìs-se, di-cés-se, a-bor-rìs-se [2t, all]
noi fa-cés-si-mo, as-pet-tàs-si-mo, ven-dés-si-mo, es-pel-lés-si-mo, a-gìs-si-mo, di-cés-si-mo, a-bor-rìs-si-mo [3t, all]
voi fa-cés-te, as-pet-tàs-te, ven-dés-te, es-pel-lés-te, a-gìs-te, di-cés-te, (mi) a-bor-rìs-te [2t, all]
essi fa-cés-se-ro, as-pet-tàs-se-ro, ven-dés-se-ro, es-pel-lés-se-ro, a-gìs-se-ro, di-cés-se-ro, a-bor-rìs-se-ro [3t, all]

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- B - Pattern area with exceptions,

INDICATIVE - (3) Simple Past [6 persons]

The simple past indicative of any Italian verb appears to follow this pattern for the first and second persons singular and all the three persons plural:

Pattern 3: 2t (piana), 2t (piana), -- (see below), 2t (piana), 2t (piana), 3t (sdrucciola)

Example for partire (to leave):
io partìi [2t]
tu partìsti [2t]
egli -- (see below)
noi partìmmo [3t]
voi partìste [2t]
essi partìrono [3t]

The accent pattern for the third person singular is as follows.

For verbs in "are":

1t (tronca) for regular verbs. Example:
aspettare (to wait): as-pet-tò [1t]

1t for the irregular "andare", which hence, as to the accent, behaves as if it were regular, :
andare (to go): an-dò [1t]

2t for these other irregular verbs:
dare (to give): dèt-te [2t], or also diè-de [2t]
fare (to do/make): fé-ce [2t]
stare (to stay): stèt-te [2t]

For verbs in "ere":

2t (piana) for both regular and irregular verbs. Example:
ricevere (to receive): ri-ce-vèt-te [2t, regular verb]
costringere (to constrain): cos-trìn-se [2t, irregular verb]

As a unique exception, the third person singular of the simple past of "èssere" (to be) is the 1t (tronca) word "fu". In the ancient Italian, the form "fùe" was also used, which is a 2t word. Nella Divina Commedia di Dante si trovano entrambe le forme nello stesso verso: "...mio figlio fu e tuo bisavol fue"

For verbs in "ire":

1t for almost all verbs in "ire", both regular and irregular. Example:
dormire (to sleep): dor-mì [1t, regular verb]
offrire (to offer): of-frì [1t, irregular verb]
There are two exceptions though. The following two irregular verbs are 2t words:
dire (to say/tell): dìs-se [2t, irregular verb]
venire (to come): vén-ne [2t, irregular verb]

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- C - Area with more exceptions

When I found that "càusano" [4t, cà-u-sa-no] (they cause) is a bisdrucciola word, as I said before, I started thinking that moods and tenses exhibiting a regular pattern had to be found so to get them separated from the rest, which in my opinion is constituted by these items:

(1) Present Indicative, (5) Present Subjunctive, (8) Present Imperative, (9) Present Infinitive

So far, I haven't found any rule or pattern for these, except for the fact that, for a given verb, the present indicative and subjunctive would seem to go on a common path:

io càusi [3t]
tu càusi [3t]
egli càusi [3t]
noi càusiamo [4t]
voi càusiate [4t]
essi càusino [4t, cà-u-si-no]

(I counted the diphthong "ia" for one because it sounds as one vowel, eg like "ye" in "yet").

The imperative too, which is a 2t (piana) word in a lot of other cases (còrri! (run!), fài! (do!), lèggi (read!), and so on) is a 3t word: càusa! (cause!) (not so much used though!).

After "càusano", the next common verb that came to mind was "àugurano" (they wish), which is a 5t word. I was firstly led to think that the diphthong "au" was somewhat responsible for a so retracted position of the accent ("au" is pronounced as two separate vowels, before the 'a' and then the 'u': à-u-gu-ra-no) and just out of curiosity read the pages from "au" to "az" of my dictionary.
But "au" looks innocent. I came across "àvocano" (they take it upon themselves, 4t) and "autènticano" (they authenticate, 4t) as well as the more normal "aumèntano" (they increase, 3t) and "auscùltano" (to auscultate, 3t).

Please post the links to the references you mentioned, I'm interested. The previous version of this post of mine contained more informations about the accent patterns in the area A. For example, the Italian Future Indicative and Present Conditional embed a modal verb in their endings, in a pretty similar way to the English language which uses "will" and "would" to form them. The presence of this modal verb constitutes a further clue that the accent pattern of the future and conditional can't change, no matter how much irregular the verb is. I removed all this information from my post because it would become excessively long, and even because my English looked terrible to me. But if you are interested, I could try to reword and post it.


Quintus
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11.06.2012 - Note
Due to an erroneous copy and paste operation from the previous part, the personal pronoun mi was left before each of the six voices of the imperfect subjunctive of the verb "aborrire": (mi) a-bor-rìs-si, (mi) a-bor-rìs-si, (mi)[/i] a-bor-rìs-se, etc.
"aborrire", as well as "to abhor", is not a reflexive verb. The text is now amended.
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